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Leukemia cells evade immune system by mimicking normal cells, Stanford studies show

STANFORD, Calif. Human leukemia stem cells escape detection by co-opting a protective molecular badge used by normal blood stem cells to migrate safely within the body, according to a pair of studies by researchers at Stanford University Medical School. "We call it the 'Don't eat me signal,'" ...

Fluorescent probes may permit monitoring of chemotherapy effectiveness, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. Going out like a brilliant flame is one way to get attention. If physicians could watch tumor cells committing a form of programmed suicide called apoptosis, a desired effect of workhorse cancer treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, they could more quickly pick the mo...

Rare sheep could be key to better diagnostic tests in developing world, says Stanford study

STANFORD, Calif. The newest revolution in microbiology testing walks on four legs and says "baa." It's the hair sheep, a less-hirsute version of the familiar woolly barnyard resident. A new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine, which is to be published July 3 in PLoS ONE , fin...

Canary Foundation and Stanford University Commit $20 Million for World-Class Research Center for Cancer Early Detection

Center will be the first in the world to integrate research on both in vivo and in vitro diagnostics to deliver blood and complementary imaging tests for solid tumor cancers PALO ALTO, Calif., June 9 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Canary Foundation, a nonprofit organization that funds research in...

Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford to Raise Its Voice for Kids in Health Care Reform Debate

Online Mobilization Campaign Urges Congress to Make Health Reform Work for Children STANFORD, Calif., May 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford is joining the National Association of Children's Hospitals (N.A.C.H.) as it gears up to launch a grassroots mobilizatio...

Extreme makeover: Stanford scientists explore new way to change cell's identity

STANFORD, Calif. Even cells aren't immune to peer pressure. Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have now shown that skin cells can be coaxed to behave like muscle cells and muscle cells like skin cells solely by altering who they hang out with: the relative levels of the in...

Narcolepsy is an autoimmune disorder, Stanford researcher says

STANFORD, Calif. Ten years ago, Stanford University School of Medicine scientist Emmanuel Mignot, MD, PhD, and his colleagues made headlines when they identified the culprit behind the sleep disorder narcolepsy. Now Mignot and his collaborators have shown for the first time that a specific immune...

UCSF, Stanford Study Reveals Neural Networks Targeted in Brain Diseases

The study, reported in the April 16 issue of the journal "Neuron," was conducted by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco and the Stanford University School of Medicine, who characterized their finding as "an important new framework for understanding neurodegene...

New alternative to biopsy detects subtle changes in cancer cells, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. A drop of blood or a chunk of tissue smaller than the period at the end of this sentence may one day be all that is necessary to diagnose cancers and assess their response to treatment, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. In a study to be published A...

Technique may help stem cells generate solid organs, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. Stem cells can thrive in segments of well-vascularized tissue temporarily removed from laboratory animals, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Once the cells have nestled into the tissue's nooks and crannies, the so-called "bioscaffold" can then be seam...

New findings on old kidneys could enhance transplants, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. The older the kidney, the worse it works though exactly how much worse isn't known. But with a mean wait time of over three years for a kidney transplant, even old kidneys are in demand. The challenge for doctors is to determine a kidney's prospects prior to the operation. Re...

'Relocation' plan of metastatic cancer cells uncovered by Stanford researchers

STANFORD, Calif. Few things are as tiresome as house hunting and moving. Unfortunately, metastatic cancer cells have the relocation process down pat. Tripping nimbly from one abode to another, these migrating cancer cells often prove far more deadly than the original tumor. Although little has be...

Ronald McDonald House at Stanford Bids a Holiday Goodbye to Longest Residents

PALO ALTO, Calif., Dec. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- After more than two-and-a-half years, Ronald McDonald House at Stanford is saying goodbye to its longest continuous residents, Shawn Stockwell and his family from Eagle River, AK. Shawn's mother, Trista, summed up the families' elation saying, "...

Type-1 diabetes not so much bad genes as good genes behaving badly, Stanford research shows

STANFORD, Calif. Investigators combing the genome in the hope of finding genetic variants responsible for triggering early-onset diabetes may be looking in the wrong place, new research at the Stanford University School of Medicine suggests. Early-onset diabetes, also known as type-1 diabet...

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Awards Major Grant to Stanford Researcher

LLS Specialized Center of Research Program Hits $178 Million Mark WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., Sept. 30 /PRNewswire/ -- The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) today announced it has awarded a new Marshall A. Lichtman Specialized Center of Research (SCOR) grant to Beverly Mitchell, M.D., George E. Beck...

New leukemia signal could point way to better treatment, Stanford researchers find

STANFORD, Calif. - Cancer researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered a promising new chemotherapy target for a deadly form of leukemia. Their discovery hinges on a novel "double agent" role for a molecular signal that regulates cell growth. The rogue signal, glyco...

Risk of breast cancer mutations underestimated for Asian women, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. - Oncologist Allison Kurian, MD, and her colleagues at the Stanford University School of Medicine were perplexed. Computer models designed to identify women who might have dangerous genetic mutations that increase their risk of breast and ovarian cancer worked well for white women...

New approach, old drug show promise against hepatitis C, Stanford research shows

STANFORD, Calif. - The fight against the liver disease hepatitis C has been at something of an impasse for years, with more than 150 million people currently infected, and traditional antiviral treatments causing nasty side effects and often falling short of a cure. Using a novel technique, medica...

Early trigger for type-1 diabetes found in mice, Stanford scientists report

STANFORD, Calif. - Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine are shedding light on how type-1 diabetes begins. Doctors have known the disease is caused by an autoimmune attack on the pancreas, but the exact trigger of the attack has been unclear. Now, a new study in mice implicat...

New method to overcome multiple drug resistant diseases developed by Stanford researchers

Many drugs once considered Charles Atlases of the pharmaceutical realm have been reduced to the therapeutic equivalent of 97-pound weaklings as the diseases they once dispatched with ease have developed resistance to them. The problem is well documented for antibiotics, although not confined to...

Kaiser Permanente - Stanford Heart Research Center Funded to Study Treatment Outcomes

OAKLAND, Calif., Aug. 11 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Heart Association has awarded Kaiser Permanente's Division of Research in Oakland and Stanford University Medical Center $3.89 million over the next four years to establish jointly a new heart research center that aims to define optimal cli...

Cancer cells revert to normal at specific signal threshold, Stanford researchers find

STANFORD, Calif. - Cancer starts when key cellular signals run amok, driving uncontrolled cell growth. But scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine report that lowering levels of one cancer signal under a specific threshold reverses this process in mice, returning tumor cells to th...

The Sir Allen Stanford Pediatric Fellowship Program Provides Close To CHF 1 Million to Support Kinderspital Zurich

ZURICH, Switzerland, June 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Stanford Financial Group ("Stanford") announces the Sir Allen Stanford Pediatric Fellowship Program with Kinderspital Zurich - the University Children's Hospital in Zurich. Stanford's new program will provide financial support to Kinderspital Zurich...

GlaxoSmithKline Announces $500,000 in Fellowships at Stanford Graduate School of Business

Global Pharmaceutical Company Honors Former CEO with Permanent Legacy at Alma Mater PHILADELPHIA, May 22 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE: GSK) today announced the establishment of two fellowships totaling $500,000 in honor of former Chief Executive...

Vital Images Showcases the ViTAL Enterprise Solution at Stanford University's 6th Annual Face-Off

Advanced Clinical Functionality and Innovative Clinical Tools Deliver Exceptional Performance LAS VEGAS, May 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Vital Images, Inc. (Nasdaq: VTAL), a leading provider of enterprise-wide advanced visualization and analysis solutions featured ViTA...

Brooks Brothers CEO at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital(R) To Announce Partnership With Stanford St. Jude Championship

MEMPHIS, Tenn., May 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Brooks Brothers Chairman and CEO Claudio Del Vecchio was at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital recently to announce that the company is joining with Stanford Financial Group to support St. Jude Children's Research Hospital through a signature sponsorshi...

High blood pressure still sneaking past doctors, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. - Despite the well-known dangers of high blood pressure, major shortfalls still exist in the screening, treatment and control of the disease even when patients are getting a doctor's care, according to a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. In a unique look at...

Inaugural Stanford International Pro-Am Winner A Remarkable Story in Determination And the Powerful Impact of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

AVENTURA, Fla., April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- There are many, many special moments that happen every day at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital(R), but every once in a while there is a moment that is a testament to the life-changing work of the hospital and the perseverance and determination of t...

Defending Champion Woody Austin Helps Memphis Kick-off Countdown to 2008 Stanford St. Jude Championship

Top-rated players committed, all-new ticket packages available, as tournament celebrates 51st year in Memphis MEMPHIS, Tenn., April 4, 2008 /PRNewswire/ -- Last year's Stanford St. Jude Championship certainly made a winner out of Woody Austin, who went on to enjoy his best sea...

YoNaturals to Install Healthy Vending Machines at Stanford University

Dedicated to offering the best for its gifted students and staff members, Stanford University will soon be equipped with new, 'cutting edge', vending machines, which are geared towards natural and organic products. SAN DIEGO, March 24 /PRNewswire/ -- Based out of Solana Beach, Ca, YoNaturals...

Cancer detected earlier, faster, with new medical imaging, Stanford study finds

STANFORD, Calif. - Doctors may one day be able to detect early stages of colon cancer without a biopsy, using a new technique developed by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. This imaging technology is one of many new ways of detecting cancers in the body in real time, sa...

Hand-held computers prod older adults to exercise more, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. - Today's younger generation may reckon that "ne'er the twain shall meet" where technology and their elders are concerned. However, ongoing research by Abby King, PhD, professor of health research and policy and of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, appears to be...

Video games activate reward regions of brain in men more than women, Stanford study finds

STANFORD, Calif. - Allan Reiss, MD, and his colleagues have a pretty good idea why your husband or boyfriend can't put down the Halo 3. In a first-of-its-kind imaging study, the Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have shown that the part of the brain that generates rewarding feelin...

New nanotube findings by Stanford researchers give boost to potential biomedical applications

Carbon nanotubes-cylinders so tiny that it takes 50,000 lying side by side to equal the width of a human hair-are packed with the potential to be highly accurate vehicles for administering medicines and other therapeutic agents to patients. But a dearth of data about what happens to the tubes afte...

Computer calls can talk couch potatoes into walking, Stanford study finds

STANFORD, Calif. - Computer-generated phone calls may be an effective, low-cost way to encourage sedentary adults to exercise, according to a recent study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Results of the yearlong study found that regular telephone calls delivered fro...

Stem cell transplant can grow new immune system in certain mice, Stanford researchers find

STANFORD, Calif. - Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have taken a small but significant step, in mouse studies, toward the goal of transplanting adult stem cells to create a new immune system for people with autoimmune or genetic blood diseases. The researchers found a w...

Blood test takes step toward predicting Alzheimer's risk, Stanford researchers find

STANFORD, Calif. - One of the most distressing aspects of Alzheimer's disease is the difficulty in determining whether mild memory problems are the beginning of an inevitable mental decline. Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have developed a blood test that is a step toward...

IVF technique enables pregnancy without multiple births, Stanford researchers find

STANFORD, Calif. - An in vitro fertilization technique that can avoid multiple births appears to be effective for women older than 35, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. More than half the women in a retrospective study became pregnant after undergoing the p...

Less than one-third of women aware of landmark hormone therapy study, Stanford researcher finds

STANFORD, Calif. - Despite the huge publicity generated by a 2002 study on the potential dangers of hormone therapy for postmenopausal women, new research from the Stanford University School of Medicine found that only 29 percent of women surveyed knew about the study two years later. Additiona...

Molecular probe 'paints' cancer cells in living animals, Stanford researchers find

STANFORD, Calif. - Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have developed a molecular probe that sets aglow tumor cells within living animals. Their goal is to use the probe to improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and other diseases. The probe's main ingredient is a m...
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