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Biotech Drops on Weaker First Quarter Drug Sales, But Broader Markets Remain on a Roll

SAN FRANCISCO, May 1 /PRNewswire/ -- April was Wall Street's best month in nine years, which analysts believe sends the strongest signal yet that the economy is about to begin a turnaround. The Dow Jones industrial average provided an encore performance up 7.4 percent in April, on top of a 7.7 per...

SIGG Water Bottles: Hip But Not Necessarily Green; Were Madonna and Cindy Crawford Hoodwinked?

Real Green Goods Raises Questions about SIGG and Recommends Greener Bottle Concord, NH (PRWEB) July 25, 2008 -- These days, when you see a picture of Cindy Crawford or Madonna, they're probably sipping water from a SIGG bottle. "Carrying a SIGG bottle has become a ...

Not the protein, but its location in the cell, determines the onset of leukemia

T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) The white blood cells in our body combat foreign intruders, such as viruses and bacteria. However, in leukemia, the formation of white blood cells is disturbed: the cells that should develop into white blood cells multiply out of control without full...

Liver Diseases: A Huge European Health Burden, But Some Trends are Positive

29 Million EU Citizens (6%) Have Liver Diseases, 5th Most Common Cause of Death Yearly, Liver Cancer Alone Takes 40,000 Lives; Alcohol Abuse Takes 13,000 Number With Fatty Liver Disease Stable or Growing; Viral Hepatitis Declines MILAN, April 23 /PRNewswire/ -- ...

Citrate appears to control buckyball clumping but environmental concerns remain

Blacksburg, Va. -- Fullerenes, also fondly known as buckyballs, are showing an ugly side. Since being discovered in 1985, the hollow carbon atoms have been adapted for nanotechnology and biomedical applications ranging from electronics to carriers of imaging materials. It appears that the hydr...

Surface dislocation nucleation: Strength is but skin deep at the nanoscale, Penn engineers discover

PHILADELPHIA - For centuries, engineers have bent and torn metals to test their strength and ductility. Now, materials scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science are studying the same metals but at nanoscale sizes in the form of wires a thousand times th...

Significant Progress Made in Nation's Preparedness to Respond to Public Health Emergencies; But Gaps in Critical Areas Threaten Overall Readiness

WASHINGTON, Dec. 18 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Trust for America's Health (TFAH) today released the fifth annual "Ready or Not? Protecting the Public's Health from Disease, Disasters, and Bioterrorism" report, which found that while important progress has been made, critical areas of the natio...

New nanoparticle vaccine is more effective but less expensive

Good news for public health: Bioengineering researchers from the EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland, have developed and patented a nanoparticle that can deliver vaccines more effectively, with fewer side effects, and at a fraction of the cost of current vaccine technologies. Described in an article...

Wahl Mute on Firing from Legislative IT Bureau -- but politics could be to blame

Mark Wahl, jettisoned last week from his position as director of the nonpartisan Legislative Technology Services Bureau (LTSB , is mum on the reasons for his ouster. And while Senate Majority Leader Mary Panzer, (R-West Bend) cited the results of an audit of the bureaus performance as the motiv...

Health Care Costs Continue Double-Digit Pace, But May Start Moderating in 2004

U.S. health care cost increases continued to escalate at a double-digit pace in 2003, but there are indications that rate hikes may begin moderating as early as next year, according to global HR outsourcing and consulting firm Hewitt Associates (NYSE: HEW). For 2004, Hewitt is projecting a 12.6 per...

GM Choice is Great News, But Wisconsins Economy Must Keep on Truckin to Prosper in a New Era

MADISON It was all cheers and high-fives in Janesville last week as General Motors announced it will continue to roll trucks off the citys GM assembly line, a decision that will keep high-wage manufacturing jobs in southern Wisconsin. The news that GM will invest $175 million in the Janesville ...

Seeds for high-tech economy are being planted, but growth will take time

MADISON It shouldnt come as a surprise that Wisconsins high-tech sector suffered through a bad year in 2002. The same was true across the United States as the shock waves of the dot.com crash, investor retrenchment and the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, battered the economy. The tech indicat...

Investment tax credit bill is a good start, but Wisconsin must confront other barriers to capital formation

MADISON Now that Gov. Jim Doyle has signed a bill to promote investment in Wisconsins small start-up businesses, will the states technology sector blossom like a spring flower? Based on this law alone, dont count on it. The bills creation of tax credits for angel and early-stage investments as ...

Summertime and the living is anything but easy

Memorial Day marks the starting gate to summer. It is the harbinger of picnics and beach parties and family vacations. The fashion-conscious know that from now until Labor Day white shoes are "in." The workday gets a little shorter. Kids are out of school. In short, it is the season to relax. Fo...

In biotech competition, Wisconsin isnt first but its far from last

MADISON Wisconsins technology industry is often compared unfavorably to the tech-based economy in Minnesota, a state with more venture capital investments, more college graduates and a long history of spinning out entrepreneurial companies. For the most part, our Minnesota envy is justified but n...

Wi-Fi flows freely, but it costs

First, the good news: wireless connectivity truly is moving quickly to ubiquity. Traveling across Europe these past two weeks, my daily dose of broadband has been, exclusively, a Wi-Fi connection. I'd venture to say that hotels throughout Europe are more likely to offer broadband wireless than ...

VoIP breaks out, but let's hope it doesn't become a verb

For the last several months, Ive been using Skype , voice over IP software and service (download here ) that lets me make peer-to-peer voice calls from my computer to anyone else on the Skype platform. My interest in the product wasnt purely theoretical. Certainly I wanted to evaluate the softw...

Midwest VC investment up in 2004, but number of deals down

Last week, we looked at venture capital performance in the U.S. during 2004. We also took a look at how well the Midwest garnered its share of this investment as well as how the life science industry performed. Though I had hoped to give you a more detailed look at how the life science indust...

Stay in the driver's seat, but don't ditch technology

Technology drives business. Whoa! Put down those pitchforks and torches! Calm down, people! Easy. I am not trying to start some kind of technology for technology's sake argument here. It's very clear that not even the people who are in the business of building and selling technology should head...

Big Pharma already has a generic strategy, but needs new direction

In his February 14, 2005 article, Michael Rosen argues that Big Pharma "will be forced into generic-drug strategy," and suggests that this will be a good thing. But Big Pharma already has a generic drug strategy for traditional pharmaceuticals. This strategy has not been particularly good for ...

Inner-city entrepreneurship isn't 'Easy Street,' but some are walking the walk

St. Timothy's Church on Milwaukee's North Teutonia Avenue is a place where people can expect to hear a thing or two about angels, but usually they're angels who are depicted in flowing robes as they descend from heaven. At a meeting in the church last week, Alder Michael McGee Jr. wanted to di...

Criticare narrows loss, but sales drop after partner is bought

Milwaukee Criticare Systems Inc., which makes clinical patient monitors and sensors, reported a net loss of $245,000 for the quarter that ended March 31, on sales of $6 million. Sales were down from nearly $6.6 million in the same quarter of 2004, but operating expenses were also down, and th...

Is venture capital dead? No, but its beginning a new cycle

Howard Anderson, who teaches courses on early-stage companies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, founded or co-founded three venture capital funds. He was a self-described financial samurai. Now, hes hanging up his sword, declining to raise new money for his funds. Theres too much ven...

Sarbox necessitating ECM software, but beware of `best practices'

CHICAGO -- As more organizations look at what needs to be done in order to be compliant with SEC issues, an area that has come under the spotlight is enterprise contract management (ECM). Risk management and corporate governance issues have become issues even within the area of contracts and ma...

On track with the FDA -- But what about your coverage and reimbursement strategy?

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval or authorization is critical to any new medical technology or treatment's success. But coverage and reimbursement issues can be just as determinative. "Coverage" is whether there will be payment by an insurer for the product. "Reimbursement" is how ...

Wisconsin leads in stem cell science, but trails in producing companies

If Wisconsin is the pioneer of stem cell science, why hasnt the research blazed a path to more companies focused on commercializing stem cell discoveries? That question arose during a recent presentation by UW-Madison Professor Gabriela Cezar on the state of stem cell science in the United Sta...

Windows image bug patched, but more found

Microsoft has patched the Windows vulnerability that could allow malicious programs to be installed when users viewed pictures on their computers. But security experts say the same part of Windows has even more problems than previously thought, opening up more holes. Giving in to pressure from u...

Biotech crops gaining acceptance, but their full promise has yet to be fulfilled

Biofuels such as ethanol are in vogue these days, thanks to record oil prices and the gnawing realization that our national security would be enhanced by producing more energy at home. While the debate continues on how best to unlock the energy potential of crops such as corn, a quiet revolution ...

Wisconsin VC rank drops, but absolute numbers are on the rise

Wisconsin dropped to 35th place nationally in venture capital investment for 2005 from 26th in 2004, according to the yearly MoneyTree survey. Nationally, venture capital recorded by the survey remained steady at $21.7 billion, just a hair over 2004's total. According to MoneyTree, 10 Wisconsin ...

Report card praises Wisconsin economy, but comes with warning

Wisconsin made the honor roll of a national economic development assessment group for its high quality of life and quality jobs. The 2006 Development Report Card for the States, released last week by the non-profit Corporation for Enterprise Development, gave the state an A in performance and Bs...

Simplicity appeals to CIOs, but it's no easy task

Madison, Wis. Information technology suffers from one bugbear above all: complexity. That was the view presented by a technology analyst on Wednesday night and explored by panelists and attendees of the Fusion2006 CEO-CIO Symposium. "Simplicity in IT is something that will win," said Frank ...

Theres more than a bit of mystery, but attracting 'Big Pharma' is good for the state

It has all the makings of a Hollywood hit a mysterious drug company... money local heroes trying to do what's right for their community even a "leading lady" of sorts. But it's not "The Constant Gardener," the film that won a Best Supporting Actress award this week for Rachel Weisz. Rather, it...

Old bell system merging back together, but it's not the same

AT&T buying BellSouth for $67 billion creates a bigger entity to deal with for regulators. In an editorial about a year ago, I coined the term "revestiture". In it, I observed that consolidation just like in the oligopoly that is the automobile industry is a natural evolution and is critical f...

IT critical in pandemic response, but many are not paying attention

Scientists say it's not a matter of if, but when. And when pandemic flu hits an event that could, at the least, keep large sections of the population from working, shut down travel and public institutions and cause infrastructure outages information technology may be called on to ease the burden ...

Fiserv makes over $1 billion, but profits decline

Milwaukee, Wis. Fiserv, which provides software and services to the financial and health-benefits industries, said its first-quarter revenues in 2006 were up 13 percent to $1.1 billion. Net income was $116 million, down slightly from the $140 million the company made in the first quarter of 2...

Stem cells raise hopes, but is there money in them?

Madison, Wis. One of the more hopeful promises of stem cells is the creation of new organs, grown to meet the medical demand that is not being met by organ donation. But experts expressed concerns at last week's Stem Cell Symposium that high hopes could lead to backlash: among patients if cures ...

It's not exactly OPEC, but Midwest states are trading ideas on biofuels

M adison, Wis. - Dr. Chuck Rice of Kansas State University believes a byproduct of biofuels production in the Midwest will be better farming methods that allow the soil to retain more carbon dioxide, thus reducing greenhouse gases. Brendan Jordan of the Great Plains Institute for Sustain...

Wisconsin students test well on ACT, but relatively few are ready for college rigors

Madison, Wis. - Wisconsin high-school students are again among the nation's elite when it comes to scoring well on the ACT , a major college preparedness test. With an average score of 22.2 on a 36-point scale, Wisconsin ranked second nationally among states that depend on the ACT, falling on...

Sir Ken Robinson: Companies, kids "get" innovation, but K-12 doesn't nurture it

Waukesha, Wis. - Sir Ken Robinson has many stories to tell, but perhaps nothing is more illustrative of his point about creativity than the story of a little girl drawing in the back of a classroom. Robinson, a senior advisor to the J. Paul Getty Trust in Los Angeles and an internationall...

It's not Y2K, but changes to Daylight Saving Time could cause tech problems

Madison, Wis. - Forthcoming changes to Daylight Saving Time will have significant implications for organizations worldwide, but few business organizations are prepared to address their potential information technology impacts, according to a new report from Gartner, Inc . Gartner, a tech...
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Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Scientists target receptor to treat diabetic retinopathy 2Scientists target receptor to treat diabetic retinopathy 3'Chaperone' compounds offer new approach to Alzheimer's treatment 2'Chaperone' compounds offer new approach to Alzheimer's treatment 3Dana-Farber researchers uncover link between Down syndrome and leukemia 2Dana-Farber researchers uncover link between Down syndrome and leukemia 3
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Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Benaroya Research Institute evaluates immunology approach to blocking breast cancer 2Health News:New research shows people are thinking about their health early in the week 2Health News:New clues on tissue scarring in scleroderma 2Health News:Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer 2Health News:Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer 3
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