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Plastics that convert light to electricity could have a big impact

Researchers the world over are striving to develop organic solar cells that can be produced easily and inexpensively as thin films that could be widely used to generate electricity. But a major obstacle is coaxing these carbon-based materials to reliably form the proper structure at the nanos...

Novel drug discovery tool could identify promising new therapies for Parkinson's disease

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have turned simple baker's yeast into a virtual army of medicinal chemists capable of rapidly searching for drugs to treat Parkinson's disease. In a study published online today in Nature Chemical Biology , the researchers showed that the...

New MRI technique could mean fewer breast biopsies in high-risk women

MADISON A University of Wisconsin-Madison biomedical engineer and colleagues have developed a method that, applied in MRI scans of the breast, could spare some women with increased breast cancer risk the pain and stress of having to endure a biopsy of a questionable lump or lesion. The univers...

UCF team's advanced nerve cell system could help cure diabetic neuropathy, related diseases

Multiple sclerosis, diabetic neuropathy, and other conditions caused by a loss of myelin insulation around nerves can be debilitating and even deadly, but adequate treatments do not yet exist. That's in large part because of deficiencies in model research systems. In an upcoming issue of the journ...

Light sensor breakthrough could enhance digital cameras

TORONTO, ON New research by a team of University of Toronto scientists could lead to substantial advancements in the performance of a variety of electronic devices including digital cameras. Researchers created a light sensor like a pixel in a digital camera that benefits from a phenomenon k...

Secret of sandcastle construction could help revive ancient building technique, researchers say

The secret of a successful sandcastle could aid the revival of an ancient eco-friendly building technique, according to research led by Durham University. Researchers, led by experts at Durham's School of Engineering, have carried out a study into the strength of rammed earth, which is growing ...

New rotors could help develop nanoscale generators

In collaboration with the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, scientists have investigated the rotation of molecules on a fixed surface to understand how they may help in the development of future rotor-based machinery at nanoscale level. The research focused on rotating magnetic fields, ...

Inexpensive plastic used in CDs could improve aircraft, computer electronics

HOUSTON, May 15, 2009 If one University of Houston professor has his way, the inexpensive plastic now used to manufacture CDs and DVDs will one day soon be put to use in improving the integrity of electronics in aircraft, computers and iPhones. Thanks to a pair of grants from the U.S. Air Fo...

'Adipose-derived' Stem Cells Could Help Traumatic Brain Injury Patients, Says Bio-Matrix Scientific Group's, Entest BioMedical Inc. Researcher

SAN DIEGO, May 13 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Dr. Feng Lin, Director of Research at Bio-Matrix Scientific Group Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: BMSN) and Entest BioMedical Inc., today stated that he believes that an effective new therapy for "traumatic brain injury" (TBI) using autologous "adipose-derived...

Self-assembled nanowires could make chips smaller and faster

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Researchers at the University of Illinois have found a new way to make transistors smaller and faster. The technique uses self-assembled, self-aligned, and defect-free nanowire channels made of gallium arsenide. In a paper to appear in the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Elect...

Putting the squeeze on an old material could lead to 'instant on' electronic memory

The technology of storing electronic information from old cassette tapes to shiny laptop computers has been a major force in the electronics industry for decades. Low-power, high-efficiency electronic memory could be the long-term result of collaborative research led by Cornell materials scie...

Connecting Materials Science With Biology, K-State Engineers Create DNA Sensors That Could Identify Cancer Using Material Only One Atom Thick

MANHATTAN, Kan., April 13 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Kansas State University engineers think the possibilities are deep for a very thin material. Vikas Berry, assistant professor of chemical engineering, is leading research combining biological materials with graphene, a recently developed ...

MIT: New method could lead to narrower chip patterns

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--Researchers at MIT have found a novel method for etching extremely narrow lines on a microchip, using a material that can be switched from transparent to opaque, and vice versa, just by exposing it to certain wavelengths of light. Such materials are not new, but the researcher...

MIT virus battery could power cars, electronic devices

CAMBRIDGE, Mass--For the first time, MIT researchers have shown they can genetically engineer viruses to build both the positively and negatively charged ends of a lithium-ion battery. The new virus-produced batteries have the same energy capacity and power performance as state-of-the-art recha...

Regional Biotech Association Warns Vermont Legislation Could Have Profound Negative Impact

- Shumlin Promoting Senate Bill S. 48 Today; Will Thwart Burgeoning Biotechnology Industry, Costing Jobs and Research Funds in Vermont - MONTPELIER, Vt., March 27 /PRNewswire/ -- The region's largest biotechnology association today warned that a bill under consideration by the Vermont Legi...

MIT: New material could lead to faster chips

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--New research findings at MIT could lead to microchips that operate at much higher speeds than is possible with today's standard silicon chips, leading to cell phones and other communications systems that can transmit data much faster. The key to the superfast chips is the use ...

Can Obama Plan Tackle Diabetes Crisis? Epinex Test Could Help

IRVINE, Calif., March 10 /PRNewswire/ -- Diabetes will be a huge burden on President Obama's $634 billion plan to expand and improve healthcare coverage. Epinex Diagnostics , a private biomedical company located in Irvine, California, has developed a new diabetes monitoring device that could rel...

Buckyballs could keep water systems flowing

DURHAM, N.C. Microscopic particles of carbon known as buckyballs may be able to keep the nation's water pipes clear in the same way clot-busting drugs prevent arteries from clogging up. Engineers at Duke University have found that buckyballs hinder the ability of bacteria and other microorgani...

MIT: 'Nanostitching' could strengthen airplane skins, more

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--MIT engineers are using carbon nanotubes only billionths of a meter thick to stitch together aerospace materials in work that could make airplane skins and other products some 10 times stronger at a nominal increase in cost. Moreover, advanced composites reinforced with nanot...

Genetic discovery could lead to advances in dental treatment

CORVALLIS, Ore. Researchers have identified the gene that ultimately controls the production of tooth enamel, a significant advance that could some day lead to the repair of damaged enamel, a new concept in cavity prevention, and restoration or even the production of replacement teeth. The gen...

Cheaper materials could be key to low-cost solar cells

Berkeley -- Unconventional solar cell materials that are as abundant but much less costly than silicon and other semiconductors in use today could substantially reduce the cost of solar photovoltaics, according to a new study from the Energy and Resources Group and the Department of Chemistry at t...

NPL research shows there could be no end in sight for Moore’s Law

The fast pace of growing computing power could be sustained for many years to come thanks to new research from the UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) that is applying advanced techniques to magnetic semiconductors. Moore's Law observed that the density of transistors on an integrated circ...

Michigan Company Founded upon What Could Be History's Most Important Breakthrough in AI and Robotics

A Michigan-based platform company has been built upon the foundation of a revolutionary new artificial intelligence patent that enables contemplative, synthetic brains to dynamically build themselves on a wide variety of computational platforms. The emphasis of this new business enterprise will b...

Cold atoms could replace hot gallium in focused ion beams

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a radical new method of focusing a stream of ions into a point as small as one nanometer (one billionth of a meter).* Because of the versatility of their approachit can be used with a wide range of ions tailored...

A new material could act as a nanofridge for microchips

In the past few years, the design and manufacturing of circuits at nanoscopic scale for integrated devices has become one of the frontier fields in new material science and technology. The significant reduction achieved in these devices often is accompanied by new discoveries in how they behave pr...

New knowledge about thermoelectric materials could give better energy efficiency

Thermoelectric materials can be assembled into units, which can transform the thermal difference to electrical energy or vice versa electrical current to cooling. An effective utilization requires however that the material supplies a high voltage and has good electrical, but low thermal conductiv...

Carbon molecule with a charge could be tomorrow's semiconductor

Blacksburg, Va. Virginia Tech chemistry Professor Harry Dorn has developed a new area of fullerene chemistry that may be the backbone for development of molecular semiconductors and quantum computing applications. Dorn plays with the hollow carbon molecules known as fullerenes as if they are ...

Vaxfectin(R)-formulated Measles DNA Vaccine Could Address Unmet Need for Infants

SAN DIEGO, Aug. 21 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Vical Incorporated (Nasdaq: VICL ) today announced that results from nonhuman primate studies of a Vaxfectin(R)-formulated DNA vaccine for measles, published in the August issue of Clinical and Vaccine Immunology(1), offer a promising approach to t...

New technique to compress light could open doors for optical communications

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have devised a way to squeeze light into tighter spaces than ever thought possible, potentially opening doors to new technology in the fields of optical communications, miniature lasers and optical computers. Optics researchers succeeded pre...

'Nanosculpture' could enable new types of heat pumps and energy converters

Troy, N.Y. A new technique for growing single-crystal nanorods and controlling their shape using biomolecules could enable the development of smaller, more powerful heat pumps and devices that harvest electricity from heat. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have discovered how to...

Discovery by UC Riverside physicists could enable development of faster computers

RIVERSIDE, Calif. Physicists at UC Riverside have made an accidental discovery in the lab that has potential to change how information in computers can be transported or stored. Dependent on the "spin" of electrons, a property electrons possess that makes them behave like tiny magnets, the discov...

Carbon nanoribbons could make smaller, speedier computer chips

Stanford chemists have developed a new way to make transistors out of carbon nanoribbons. The devices could someday be integrated into high-performance computer chips to increase their speed and generate less heat, which can damage today's silicon-based chips when transistors are packed together t...

Commencement 2008: Student innovation could improve data storage, magnetic sensors

Troy, N.Y. Paul Morrow, who will graduate from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute on May 17, has come a long way from his days as an elementary school student, pulling apart his mothers cassette player. The talented young physicist has developed two innovations that could vastly improve magnetic d...

Melting defects could lead to smaller, more powerful microchips

As microchips shrink, even tiny defects in the lines, dots and other shapes etched on them become major barriers to performance. Princeton engineers have now found a way to literally melt away such defects, using a process that could dramatically improve chip quality without increasing fabrication...

Fiber-based nanotechnology in clothing could harvest energy from physical movement

Nanotechnology researchers are developing the perfect complement to the power tie: a power shirt able to generate electricity to power small electronic devices for soldiers in the field, hikers and others whose physical motion could be harnessed and converted to electrical energy. The February ...

New polymer could improve semiconductor manufacturing, packaging

Troy, N.Y. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Polyset Company have developed a new inexpensive, quick-drying polymer that could lead to dramatic cost savings and efficiency gains in semiconductor manufacturing and computer chip packaging. Along with allowing enhanced performan...

AMDL Signs 100 Strategic Cooperation Agreements in China for Its JPGreen Clinics; Gross Sales Per Each Location Could Exceed $400,000

TUSTIN, Calif., Jan. 25 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- AMDL, Inc. (Amex: ADL), headquartered in Tustin, California, with operations in Shenzhen, Jiangxi, and Jilin China, through its wholly owned subsidiary Jade Pharmaceutical Inc., is an international biopharma company that, together with Jade, en...

'Hybrid' semiconductors show zero thermal expansion; Could lead to hardier electronics

ARGONNE, Ill. (Dec. 19, 2007) The fan in your computer is there to keep the microprocessor chip from heating to the point where its component materials start to expand, inducing cracks that interrupt the flow of electricity and not incidentally, ruin the chip. Thermal expansion can also separate...

Multigene Test Predicts Who Could Avoid Chemotherapy Despite Positive Lymph Nodes in Early Breast Cancer

SAN ANTONIO, Texas, Dec. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Kathy S. Albain, MD, of Loyola University Chicago, presented new data showing for the first time the predictive value of the 21-gene Recurrence Score (RS) assay in patients with node-positive breast cancer. The Breast Cancer Intergroup of North Ameri...

DelSite Nasal Powder Technology Could Reduce Recently Reported Waste in Federal Vaccine Program

'Room Temp' Technology Builds on Consumer Appeal and Tactical Importance of Needle-less Vaccinations IRVING, Texas, Dec. 10 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- An experimental drug delivery technology from the DelSite Biotechnologies subsidiary of Carrington Laboratories, Inc. (OTC ...
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