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war in Biological News

In the turf war against seaweed, coral reefs more resilient than expected

There's little doubt that coral reefs the world over face threats on many fronts: pollution, diseases, destructive fishing practices and warming oceans. But reefs appear to be more resistant to one potential menace seaweed than previously thought, according to new research by a team of marine sc...

In the war against diseases, nerve cells need their armor

In a new study, researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI), McGill University, and the Universit de Montral have discovered an essential mechanism for the maintenance of the normal structure of myelin, the protective covering that insulates and supports nerve cells (neurons). Up unti...

Innovative strategies for war wounded

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. The New Jersey Center for Biomaterials will host the 9th New Jersey Symposium on Biomaterials Science and Regenerative Medicine, Oct. 29 to Oct. 31 at the Hyatt Regency, New Brunswick. Academic, clinical and industrial investigators will present their strategies ...

Nanotechnology boosts war on superbugs

This week Nature Nanotechnology journal (October 12th) reveals how scientists from the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN) at UCL are using a novel nanomechanical approach to investigate the workings of vancomycin, one of the few antibiotics that can be used to combat increasingly resistan...

University of Pennsylvania researchers zero in on the tiniest members in the war on cancer

PHILADELPHIA - Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins University have uncovered another reason why one of the most commonly activated proteins in cancer is so dangerous. As reported in Nature Genetics this week, the Myc protein can stop the production of at least 13 mic...

New use for stem cells found in war on terrorism

For more than a decade, Steve Stice has dedicated his research using embryonic stem cells to improving the lives of people with degenerative diseases and debilitating injuries. His most recent discovery, which produces billions of neural cells from a few stem cells, could now aid in national secur...

Professor to measure environmental impact of war

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has invited Michel A. Bouchard, a professor from the Universit de Montral's Faculty of Arts and Sciences, to help evaluate the ecological impact of the war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and its neighboring countries. Three international...

USF professor gives historical look at physiology and WWII air war

BETHESDA, Md. (April 11, 2008) World War II-era physiologists helped solve physiological problems related to flight, research that helped pave the way for an Allied victory in the air, according to Jay B. Dean, of the University of South Florida College of Medicine. Dr. Dean prepared a presenta...

Treating HIV in war zones -- Public health emergencies need rapid advice from WHO

HIV treatment can be delivered even in settings of armed conflict, and humanitarian health agencies should not wait until a conflict is over before launching HIV care programs, say a team from Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in this week’s PLoS Medicine. Heather Culbert and colleagues report thei...

Plants give up answers in the war on bacteria

Back-to-back scientific papers are offering a revolutionary look at the battlefield on which plant diseases are fought ?and often lost ?to bacteria. The laboratory of Sheng Yang He at Michigan State University has changed the textbook description of a plant's surface terrain and is unveiling new...

Bacteria give up secrets in war waged on plants

The secret weapon of bacteria -- the way they get a foothold in plants to launch an invasion -- is less of a secret, according to research published this week by Michigan State University scientists. Under study is the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, better known as the disease agent of...

Genetic tug of war determines sexual differentiation

Whether or not a fertilized mammalian egg ultimately develops into a male or female is determined by the winner of a tug of war between two different genes encoding signaling proteins and the divergent pathways they control, according to a new study led by Duke University Medical Center cell biolog...

War on terror meets war on cancer

A scientific method that has been used to track the source of illegal drugs, explosives, counterfeit bills and biological warfare agents may have some new uses: detecting rapidly growing cancers and studying obesity and eating disorders. The method, known as "stable isotope ratio mass spectromet...

Vietnam war technology could aid elephant conservation

Seismic sensors developed to track enemy troop movements during the Vietnam war could help ecologists monitor and conserve elephant populations, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology. Dr Jason Wood and colleagues from Stanford Universit...

Our 'caveman logic' embraces ESP over evolution

...th of rational explanations for natural phenomena, we often prefer to embrace the fantasies that reassured our distant ancestors. And we'll even go to war to protect our delusions against those who do not share them. These are examples of what evolutionary psychologist Hank Davis calls "Caveman Logic....

Reading the brain without poking it

... Meanwhile, researchers at the University of Utah and elsewhere are working on a $55 million Pentagon project to develop a lifelike bionic arm that war veterans and other amputees would control with their thoughts, just like a real arm. Scientists are debating whether the prosthetic devices should be ...

Singapore nanotechnology combats fatal brain infections

... Doctors may get a new arsenal for meningitis treatment and the war on drug-resistant bacteria and fungal infections with novel peptide nanoparticles developed by scientists at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nano...

Duke, Harvard researchers to monitor bonobo reintroduction

...o, which has been torn apart by almost a decade of war that has killed more than five million people, making it the bloodiest war since World war II. The reintroduction of wild-born orphans reh...

Healing wounds with lasers, vehicles that drive themselves, other cutting-edge optics

...tions. Perhaps the most extreme example of ever-changing conditions is a war zone, where roads may be reduced to rubble and vehicles are natural targets...out of harm's way. But will it be possible for these vehicles to operate in war zones? This question was the inspiration for a recent Defense Advanced Rese...

American Chemical Society's Weekly PressPac -- May 20, 2009

...ring News An unlikely friendship between a 94-year-old retired scientist and a biochemist at Rutgers University has lead to the revival of a World war II-era research program to develop new drugs against malaria, the deadly mosquito-borne disease that kills almost one million people annually, accordi...

DNA barcoding of mosquito species deployed in bid to end elephantiasis

... allow scientists to quickly and accurately distinguish species based on a simple DNA analysis are being creatively deployed for the first time in the war against a major global disease. The University of Ghana, supported by the Philadelphia-based JRS Biodiversity Foundation, is pioneering the use of ...

UC Davis launches 'One Health' care for wild mountain gorillas and human neighbors

...s remain extremely vulnerable: They live in fragments of habitat surrounded by the densest human populations in Africa, Their forests are sometimes in war zones, and are cut down for production of charcoal. And they fall victim to snares set by poachers for gorillas or other "bush-meat" animals, such as ...

Afghanistan declares its first national park

... Band-e-Amir had been a destination for travelers since the 1950s, with a peak visitation in the 1970s. Tourism was almost entirely absent during the war years between 1979-2001. Today, Band-e-Amir is visited every year by thousands of Afghan tourists and religious pilgrims as well as many foreigners c...

Our brains make their own marijuana: We're all pot heads deep inside

...r (THC) affected by marijuana. Out of the extracted proteins, several not only bound to the brain's THC receptors, but activated them as well. "The war on Drugs has hit very close to home," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal . "Last year, scientists found that our skin ...

The story of X -- evolution of a sex chromosome

...s that are harmful to females. Biologists have realized recently that some genes have opposite effects in males and females, and evolution is a tug of war between males jettisoning genes that they find detrimental only to have females put them back, and vice versa. "A good place to put sexually antago...

Selected personal letters of Max Perutz are released in new book

...of Max's experiences while an "enemy alien" interned in Canada during World war II, his super-secret war work for the British to build a floating ice airstrip in the North Atlantic...

Stanford scientists find new solutions for the arsenic-poisoning crisis in Asia

...the big river system is very similar as well." More importantly, the Cambodia site was mostly undeveloped. "Cambodia had been under a 35-year civil war that had really repressed its development, so it was in essence Bangladesh 40 or 50 years ago," he said. "In some ways it would actually be setting th...

CellThera and WPI advance in regeneration study

...l wounds that involve bone, muscle, nerves, and soft tissue. The impetus for the program is to develop new therapies for soldiers who return home from war with major injuries. If successful, however, the science will have a broad range of civilian applications, as well. "Translating basic science advanc...

It's for the birds

...ngly old office dating from before WWII. The cards contain almost all of what was known of bird distribution and natural history from the Second World war back to the later part of the 19th century, said USGS senior scientist Chan Robbins, who kept track of the cards' whereabouts in attics and basements ...

Information warfare in the 21st century: Ideas are sometimes stronger than bombs

...ws that terrorist organizations have created built-in advantages in the information warfare. For example, one of the conclusions of the Second Lebanon war is that one of Hezbollah's targets was to drag Israel into a disproportionate response so that it would be able to exhibit Israel in the Western and A...

Evidence of earliest known domestic horses found in Kazakhstan

...le is simply a leather thong draped over this gap and knotted under the chin, with the trailing ends acting as the reins. Plains Indians called this a war bridle or racing bridle and it most likely is the type of bridle that was developed first. "The domestication of horses is known to have had immens...

2 McGill researchers garner prestigious NSERC Steacie Fellowships

...anding chemist and research leader who made significant contributions to the development of science in Canada during, and immediately following, World war II. Dr. Steacie believed young researchers are great national assets and should be given every opportunity to develop their own ideas. Through his phi...

UMMS researchers publish DNA identification of czar's children

...distant maternal relatives of Queen Victoria in their work. Czar Nicholas II, his wife Alexandra and their five children were assassinated as civil war broke out; numerous stories circulated over the years that Anastasia, then 17, somehow escaped. In 1991, five bodies were found and later identified a...

Study finds most wars occur in Earth's richest biological regions

...astal mangroves, and timber harvesting that funded war chests in Liberia, Cambodia and Democratic Republi...nd countless other cases, the collateral damage of war harmed both the biological wealth of the region an...ility of people to live off of it. In addition, war refugees must hunt, gather firewood or build encam...

Link between unexploded munitions in oceans and cancer-causing toxins determined

...of radioactive matter instead he found a link to cancer. Data revealed that the closer corals and marine life were to unexploded bombs from the World war II vessel and the surrounding target range, the higher the rates of carcinogenic materials. "Unexploded bombs are in the ocean for a variety of re...

Brupbacher prize to Nubia Munoz and Sir Richard Peto

... the free distribution of cigarettes to British soldiers in the First World war led in the course of decades to more victims than the war itself. Peto and his staff were also able to show that giving up smokin...

The Evolution of Human Aggression: Feb. 25-27 conference

...5-27 to debate how evolution has shaped human aggression and violence, from war to domestic abuse and homicide. "What evolutionary forces underlie huma...om Emory University in Atlanta. De Waal's talk is titled, "Destined to Wage war Forever? The Evolution of Peacemaking among Primates." 9 a.m. Thursday, ...

CACI Awarded a Prime Position on $500 Million, Multiple-Award Program with Biometrics Operations and Support Services

...ports warfighters as they face new challenges and threats in the asymmetric war being waged against global terrorism. Biometric capabilities offer the sing... in the event of a priority need for funds, such as homeland security, the war on terrorism or rebuilding Iraq; government contract procurement (such as b...

Nearly a century later, new findings support Warburg theory of cancer

...on University School of Medicine report new evidence in support of the original Warburg Theory of Cancer. A descendant of German aristocrats, World war I cavalry officer and pioneering biochemist, Warburg first proposed in 1924 that the prime cause of cancer was injury to a cell caused by impairment t...

UT faculty members win American Heart Association awards for advancing research

...ts. Dr. Holcomb, while serving in the U.S. Army (now retired) made significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of injured patients in war zones as well as civilian trauma. His contributions have led to a new paradigm in transfusion of patients sustaining blood loss. He well deserves this...
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(Date:7/10/2014)... YORK , June 27, 2014  Pomerantz ... Provectus Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. ("Provectus" or the "Company")(NYSE-MKT: PVCT) ... filed in United States District Court, Middle District ... is on behalf of a class consisting of ... acquired Provectus securities between December 17, 2013 and ...
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Breaking Biology News(10 mins):SHAREHOLDER ALERT: Pomerantz Law Firm Announces the Filing of a Class Action against Provectus Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. and Certain Officers - PVCT 2SHAREHOLDER ALERT: Pomerantz Law Firm Announces the Filing of a Class Action against Provectus Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. and Certain Officers - PVCT 3Security and Your Money: Tampa Bay Radio Host Cedric Harris Talks to NXT-ID CEO Mr. Gino Pereira about the Wocket Smart Wallet 2Security and Your Money: Tampa Bay Radio Host Cedric Harris Talks to NXT-ID CEO Mr. Gino Pereira about the Wocket Smart Wallet 3Security and Your Money: Tampa Bay Radio Host Cedric Harris Talks to NXT-ID CEO Mr. Gino Pereira about the Wocket Smart Wallet 4FPC Wins DW and Initial Ramp Order for FPC1021 Touch Sensor for Flagship Smartphone from Asian OEM 2
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Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Rochester Surgeon Hits Milestone with Keller Funnel 2Health News:Brains of Sex Addicts May Be Wired Like Those of Drug Addicts, Study Finds 2Health News:CDC Issues Tough Report on Anthrax Scare 2Health News:Probiotic Ingredient Market worth $1,732.8 Million by 2019 - A Report by MarketsandMarkets 2Health News:Probiotic Ingredient Market worth $1,732.8 Million by 2019 - A Report by MarketsandMarkets 3Health News:Probiotic Ingredient Market worth $1,732.8 Million by 2019 - A Report by MarketsandMarkets 4Health News:Probiotic Ingredient Market worth $1,732.8 Million by 2019 - A Report by MarketsandMarkets 5Health News:Internet of Things Technology & Application Market Worth $1423.09 Billion by 2020 – New Report by MarketsandMarkets 2Health News:Internet of Things Technology & Application Market Worth $1423.09 Billion by 2020 – New Report by MarketsandMarkets 3Health News:Internet of Things Technology & Application Market Worth $1423.09 Billion by 2020 – New Report by MarketsandMarkets 4
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