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Gene expression findings a step toward better classification and treatment of juvenile arthritis

Scientists have discovered gene expression differences that could lead to better ways to classify, predict outcome, and treat juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Eventually such findings could enable doctors to target more aggressive treatment to children at risk of more severe arthritis, while t...

Activated stem cells in damaged lungs could be first step toward cancer

DURHAM, N.C. Stem cells that respond after a severe injury in the lungs of mice may be a source of rapidly dividing cells that lead to lung cancer, according to a team of American and British researchers. "There are chemically resistant, local-tissue stem cells in the lung that only activate...

Progress toward artificial tissue?

This release is available in German . For modern implants and the growth of artificial tissue and organs, it is important to generate materials with characteristics that closely emulate nature. However, the tissue in our bodies has a combination of traits that are very hard to recreate in...

Optimum running speed is stride toward understanding human body form

MADISON Runners, listen up: If your body is telling you that your pace feels a little too fast or a little too slow, it may be right. A new study, published online March 18 in the Journal of Human Evolution , shows that the efficiency of human running varies with speed and that each individu...

Greatest thing since sliced bread: New data offer important clues toward improving wheat yields

Breed a better crop of wheat? That's exactly what a team of researchers from Kansas State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture hope their research will lead to. In their study, appearing in the March 2009 issue of the journal GENETICS ( http://www.genetics.org ), they analyzed the t...

Milestone achieved toward production of malaria treatment using synthetic biology and fermentation

EMERYVILLE, Calif., March 2, 2009 - Amyris Biotechnologies has announced the publication of an article which reveals the achievement of a significant milestone toward the production of amorphadiene, a precursor of the antimalarial agent artemisinin. The article, "High-level production of amorp...

Scientists make strides toward defining genetic signature of Alzheimer's disease

Scientists have new information about the complex genetic signature associated with Alzheimer's disease, the leading cause of cognitive decline and dementia in the elderly. The research, published by Cell Press in the January issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics , uses a powerful, high...

NIST guides genetic genealogy labs toward improved accuracy

Anyone who has watched crime dramas on TV knows that forensic scientists can use DNA profiling to identify people from evidence gathered at a crime scene, establish a paternity link or help free an innocent person who has been wrongly jailed. A lesser known but rapidly growing application of DNA p...

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News reports on the trend toward predictive toxicogenomics

New Rochelle, NY, November 19, 2008Biotech scientists increasingly are applying genomics technologies to toxicology research to better understand the effects of novel drug candidates on a variety of organ systems, reports Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News ( GEN ). They are especially inte...

Study a step toward disease-resistant crops, sustainability

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - A five-year study that could help increase disease resistance, stress tolerance and plant yields is under way at Purdue University. The $4 million project uses a new technique called "mutant-assisted gene identification and characterization," or MAGIC, to identify potenti...

Thinking it through: Scientists call for policy to guide biofuels industry toward sustainability

MBL, WOODS HOLE, MA As the United States and other nations commit to the path of biofuels production, a group of scientists is calling for sustainable practices in an industry that will, as MBL scientist Jerry Mellilo says, "reshape the Earth's landscape in a significant way." In a paper publi...

Taking the next step toward advanced artificial limbs

WORCESTER, Mass. A team of researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) will receive $1 million in federal and state grants to advance the critical development of neuroprostheticsnext-generation artificial limbs that could one day be permanently implanted and perform most of the movements...

$3.2M for Rutgers to apply biology, engineering, physical sciences toward stem cells

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. Rutgers University has received a $3.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to apply engineering, physical science and mathematical disciplines to stem cell research. In funding 70 doctoral fellowships, the program can equip experts in fields such as cell a...

Brucella abortus S19 genome sequenced; points toward virulence genes

Blacksburg, Va. Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech and the National Animal Disease Center in Ames, Iowa, and collaborators at 454 Life Sciences of Branford, Conn., have sequenced the genome of Brucella abortus strain S19. Strain S19 is a naturally occurring st...

Meteorology student SOARS toward excellence, overcomes obstacles

VIRGINIA KEY, Fla. Roque Vinicio Cspedes, a junior at the University of Miami double majoring in Meteorology and Applied Mathematics, with a minor in Spanish, has been awarded a prestigious Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) mentorship. SOARS is a paid summer re...

Findings a step toward making new optical materials

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Chemical engineers have developed a "self-assembling" method that could lead to an inexpensive way of making diamondlike crystals to improve optical communications and other technologies. The method, developed at Purdue University, works by positioning tiny particles onto...

Madagascar's tortoises are crawling toward extinction, groups say

NEW YORK (FEBRUARY 7, 2008) Madagascars turtles and tortoises, which rank among the most endangered reptiles on earth, will continue to crawl steadily toward extinction unless major conservation measure are enacted, according to a recent assessment by the Wildlife Conservation Society and other ...

Steps toward Stopping Autoimmune Disease

NEW YORK, January 20, 2008A landmark genetic study has identified multiple genes linked to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or lupus, a debilitating autoimmune disease that affects an estimated 1.4 million Americans. Lupus can affect the joints, kidneys, heart, lungs, brain and blood and oc...

MIT works toward engineered blood vessels

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.-MIT scientists have found a way to induce cells to form parallel tube-like structures that could one day serve as tiny engineered blood vessels. The researchers found that they can control the cells' development by growing them on a surface with nano-scale patterning. A paper o...

Fish farms drive wild salmon populations toward extinction

A study appearing in the December 14 issue of the journal Science shows, for the first time, that parasitic sea lice infestations caused by salmon farms are driving nearby populations of wild salmon toward extinction. The results show that the affected pink salmon populations have been rapidly dec...

A step toward tissue-engineered heart structures for children

Infants and children receiving artificial heart-valve replacements face several repeat operations as they grow, since the since the replacements become too small and must be traded for bigger ones. Researchers at Childrens Hospital Boston have now developed a solution: living, growing valves creat...

MIT works toward safer gene therapy

CAMBRIDGE, MA (09/07/2007) -- In work that could lead to safe and effective techniques for gene therapy, MIT researchers have found a way to fine-tune the ability of biodegradable polymers to deliver genes. Gene therapy, which involves inserting new genes into patients' cells to fight diseases ...

Bursts of waves drive immune system 'soldiers' toward invaders

Scientists have discovered that torrents of microscopic waves propel white blood cells toward invading microbes. The discovery - recorded on videotape -- holds the potential for better understanding and treatment of cancer and heart disease. Visible only under a very high-resolution light micro...

Progress toward an antitumor vaccine

How can we induce the body to use its own weapon, the immune system, to battle cancer" In principle, by the same means used against infectious diseases: immunization. The production of a selective vaccine is not a trivial task, however. A team led by Horst Kunst at the University of Mainz has now ...

Progress toward artificial photosynthesis?

Plants can do it: they simply grab carbon dioxide out of the air and covert it into biomass. In this process, known as photosynthesis, the plants use light as their energy source. Chemists would also like to be able to use CO2 as a carbon source for their synthetic reactions, but it doesn’t work ju...

Tiny clue reveals new path toward heart disease

Geneticists have discovered a new gene that may put individuals at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The identification of the gene, called kalirin, implicates a biological mechanism never before linked to cardiovascular disease, according to the Duke researchers who led the stud...

A sweet step toward new cancer therapies

By recognizing sugars, a technique developed by University of Michigan analytical chemist Kristina Hakansson sets the stage for new cancer diagnosis and treatment options. A growing body of evidence points to assemblies of sugars called glycans attached to proteins on cancer cell surfaces as acco...

Pathway toward gene silencing described in plants

Biologists at Washington University in St. Louis have made an important breakthrough in understanding a pathway plant cells take to silence unwanted or extra genes using short bits of RNA. Basically, they have made it possible to see where, and how, the events in the pathway unfold within the cell,...

Iraq's marshes show progress toward recovery

Reflooding of Iraq's destroyed Mesopotamian marshes since 2003 has resulted in a "remarkable rate of reestablishment" of native invertebrates, plants, fish, and birds, according to an article in the June issue of BioScience. Curtis J. Richardson of Duke University and Najah A. Hussain of the Uni...

Illegal trade is propelling rare turtle toward extinction, new report

A new report released today finds that the illegal trade in the Roti Island snake-necked turtle, found only on one island in Indonesia, has left it all but extinct in the wild. Exotic pet enthusiasts in Europe, North America and East Asia are fueling the illegal trade for the turtle, often without...

A step toward the $1,000 personal genome using readily available lab equipment

The theoretical price of having one's personal genome sequenced just fell from the prohibitive $20 million dollars to about $2.2 million, and the goal is to reduce the amount further--to about $1,000--to make individualized prevention and treatment realistic. The sharp drop is due to a new DNA se...

Moffitt-USF head toward first human trials of anti-cancer drug that targets protein AKT

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, working in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF), has discovered a new use for an old, previously discredited anti-cancer drug that could add another weapon in the arsenal against several cancers, including tumors of the breast...

Unchecked DNA replication drives earliest steps toward cancer

Although not widely appreciated as a disease of the genes, cancer is always rooted in genetic errors or problems in gene regulation. Scientists have identified some of the first genetic triggers for cancer as mutations in specific oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Full-blown tumors and metastati...

Climbing to new heights in the forest canopy

... the stems that play an integral role in the plants' climbing ability. Because climbing plants rely on their other supportive structures as they reach toward the sky, they do not need to invest their energy into building huge tree trunks to support heavy branches. Not only are they able to be flexible, but ...

Obama administration announces more than $327 million in Recovery Act funding for science research

...ment of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that more than $327 million in new funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will go toward scientific research, instrumentation, and laboratory infrastructure projects. Ten of DOE's national laboratories in six states will be receiving funds...

Growing evidence of marijuana smoke's potential dangers

...al. Rebecca Maertens and colleagues note that people often view marijuana as a "natural" product and less harmful than tobacco. As public attitudes toward marijuana change and legal restrictions ease in some countries, use of marijuana is increasing. Scientists know that marijuana smoke has adverse effec...

New hope for fisheries

...nd the California Current. This new study is a follow-up to a 2006 paper in Science by Worm and others that highlighted a widespread global trend toward fisheries collapse. The results of that paper led to a public disagreement between Worm and Hilborn. Through their subsequent discussions, however, th...

August 2009 Geology and GSA Today media highlights

...cally be between 20 and 50 parts per thousand. As sulfate concentrations in seawater decline, the isotopic offset between sulfate and sulfide declines toward zero. Geologists use the amount of this offset, as recorded in carbonate-associated sulfate and pyrite in marine limestones, to reconstruct sulfate le...

Got zinc? New zinc research suggests novel therapeutic targets

...like this help shed light on how zinc may enhance the ability of our immune systems to fight off foreign invaders. Equally important, this work points toward new possible targets for entirely new drugs to help augment immune function and prevent or stop infections that might be resistant to traditional anti...

UBC researchers help push for standard DNA barcodes for plants

...r barcode if required." Theoretically, any DNA barcoding standard would have to accommodate over 400,000 species of plants, and would be a key step toward establishing a central barcode database for taxonomy, agriculture and conservation. The 2008 International Union for Conservation of Nature Red Li...
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(Date:11/18/2014)... -- The Secure Identity & Biometrics Association (SIBA) and ... formation of The Airport Entry and Exit Working ... Biometric Entry and Exit Solutions Framework for Airports ... BORDERPOL, the international non-profit organization that works directly ... border security, traveler and migration systems. ...
(Date:11/15/2014)... YORK , Nov. 13, 2014  While we may ... technology Doctor McCoy used in "Star Trek" to gain instant ... tools designed to work with smartphones and tablets for monitoring ... of the healthcare world. This may seem a tad Orwellian ... ready to adopt some of these technological opportunities into their ...
(Date:11/7/2014)... led by Dr. Debra Auguste, associate professor, biomedical ... The City College of New York, have identified ... for one of the most aggressive forms of ... have a high mortality rate owing to aggressive ... therapeutic options. However, Professor Auguste,s team, discovered the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Identity Management, Document Authentication and Biometric Companies Form "The Airport Entry and Exit Working Group", Releasing the Framework to Help Guide the Department of Homeland Security and Congress Towards Solutions 2Identity Management, Document Authentication and Biometric Companies Form "The Airport Entry and Exit Working Group", Releasing the Framework to Help Guide the Department of Homeland Security and Congress Towards Solutions 3Americans May Be Ready for a Brave New World of Healthcare 2Americans May Be Ready for a Brave New World of Healthcare 3Americans May Be Ready for a Brave New World of Healthcare 4
(Date:12/17/2014)... Project Veritas is releasing a video ... MIT economist and Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber to public ... the interview, which is being distributed on YouTube. , ... mislabeling in the Affordable Care Act in order to ... billion dollar per year tax grab. , “President Obama ...
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Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Project Veritas: James O’Keefe Interviews the Man Who Discovered Jonathan Gruber Videos 2Health News:Music Classes Boost Language Skills, Study Says 2Health News:New Study Reveals Genetic Mutations That May Trigger Mesothelioma, According to Surviving Mesothelioma 2Health News:OutMarket Releases Cheat Sheets for Social Media Marketing 2Health News:OutMarket Releases Cheat Sheets for Social Media Marketing 3Health News:Kathy McAfee, America’s Marketing Motivator, Wins Best Blog from Women World Awards 2
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