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Muscle atrophy through thick but not thin

During desperate times, such as fasting, or muscle wasting that afflicts cancer or AIDS patients, the body cannibalizes itself, atrophying and breaking down skeletal muscle proteins to liberate amino acids. In a new study published online June 8 and in the June 15, 2009 print issue of the Journal...

World-class innovation through international cooperation

Welcome to the Launch Conference of the German EUREKA Chairmanship 2009/2010! The conference, hosted and conceptually designed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, will be held on July 6-7, 2009, at Maritim Hotel & International Congress Center in Dresden, situated in the heart of th...

Preventing ear infections in the future: Delivering vaccine through the skin

An experimental vaccine applied the surface of the skin appears to protect against certain types of ear infections. Scientists from the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, report their findings today at the 109th General Meeting of the American Society for Micr...

Monitoring water through a snake's eyes

Although most Americans take the safety of their drinking water for granted, that ordinary tap water could become deadly within minutes, says Prof. Abraham Katzir of Tel Aviv University's School of Physics and Astronomy. To combat the threat of contamination due to industrial spillage, natural ...

Better living through chemistry

Scientists have completed the first study of microbes that live within the plumbing of deep-sea mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Mexico, where conditions may resemble those in extraterrestrial environments and early Earth. The study, which was partially funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF),...

The fragility of the world's coral is revealed through a study of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) A new study by researchers from UC Santa Barbara's National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) sheds light on how threats to the world's endangered coral reef ecosystems can be more effectively managed. In a recent issue of the journal Coral Reefs , ...

Bird feathers produce color through structure similar to beer foam

New Haven, Conn. Some of the brightest colors in nature are created by tiny nanostructures with a structure similar to beer foam or a sponge, according to Yale University researchers. Most colors in naturefrom the color of our skin to the green of treesare produced by pigments. But the brig...

Fly like a bird through boom and bust

The ability of Australian desert birds to adapt to cycles of drought, flood, feast and famine is highlighted in a new book launched today by CSIRO Publishing at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra. Boom and Bust: Bird stories for a dry country sheds light on how desert birds survive cl...

Enhanced quality of 'LIFE' through Nordic food

The world's largest research project into children's health and well-being will help solve global problems such as obesity, obesity-related diseases and learning difficulties. The research project, which is headed by Professor Arne Astrup, is based at LIFE - Faculty of Life Sciences at University ...

Magnetic nanoparticles navigate therapeutic genes through the body

Health professionals send genes and healthy cells on their way through the bloodstream so that they can, for example, repair tissue damage to arteries. But do they reach their destination in sufficient quantities? Scientists of the PTB have developed a highly sensitive measuring method with which ...

Reducing animal experiments through top-class research

The haematologist Professor Christopher Baum and his colleagues Dr. Ute Modlich and Sabine Kn have been awarded the 2009 Ursula M. Hndel Animal Welfare Prize. The prize was awarded to this research team from the Hannover Medical School (Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, MHH) in recognition of thei...

Reducing CO2 through technology and smart growth

A Georgia Tech City and Regional Planning study on climate change, published February 10, 2009 online by Environmental Science and Technology , shows that "smart growth" combined with the use of hybrid vehicle technology could reduce cities' carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions the principal driver of...

Ocean islands fuel productivity and carbon sequestration through natural iron fertilization

An experiment to study the effects of naturally deposited iron in the Southern Ocean has filled in a key piece of the puzzle surrounding iron's role in locking atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ocean. The research, conducted by an international team led by Raymond Pollard of the National Oce...

WWF seeks innovative solutions to bycatch through worldwide competition

WASHINGTON, January 27, 2009 Designed to inspire innovative ideas for environmentally-friendly fishing gear, World Wildlife Fund launched the 4th International Smart Gear Competition with a call for new designs for fishing devices that reduce bycatchthe capture of unintended species in fishing ge...

CIC to Host Webinar Featuring Independent Research Firm: 'Enabling Straight Through Processing - Why the Insurance Industry Needs Electronic Signature Technology'

REDWOOD SHORES, Calif., Jan. 14 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Communication Intelligence Corporation (OTC Bulletin Board: CICI) (" CIC "), a leading supplier of electronic signature solutions for business process automation in the financial industry* and the recognized leader** in biometric signature ...

How mirror neurons allow us to learn and socialize by going through the motions in the head

The old adage that we can only learn how to do something by trying it ourselves may have to be revised in the light of recent discoveries in neuroscience. It turns out that humans, primates, some birds, and possibly other higher animals have mirror neurons that fire in the same pattern whether per...

Human connection to our nation's fisheries comes alive through oral history project

Voices from the Fisheries , an archive of oral histories of recreational and commercial fishermen and the communities and families that rely on them, documents the human experience with the nation's coastal, marine and Great Lakes environments and living marine resources. Social scientists Sus...

Dune and dirty: Hurricane teaches lessons through ecosystem research

AUDIO: This audio is of Dr. Rusty Feagin who was managing several ecosystem research projects on Galveston Island when the 2008 hurricane season began in June 2008. Then he ...

Plants grow bigger and more vigorously through changes in their internal clocks

AUSTIN, TexasHybrid plants, like corn, grow bigger and better than their parents because many of their genes for photosynthesis and starch metabolism are more active during the day, report researchers from The University of Texas at Austin in a new study published in the journal Nature . Their...

Sedimentary records link Himalayan erosion rates and monsoon intensity through time

Throughout history, the changing fortunes of human societies in Asia have been linked to variations in the precipitation resulting from seasonal monsoons. A new paper published online today in the journal Nature Geoscience suggests that variations in monsoon climate over longer time scales a...

Scientists achieve first tracking of salmon from headwaters in Rockies through Pacific to Alaska

Scientists have proven new miniature tagging and tracking technologies can follow the travels of small salmon through vast distances and highly dissimilar waters - from as far as the Rocky Mountain headwaters of USA's Columbia River through the ocean to the coast of Alaska. And, experts say, th...

Frost & Sullivan Recognizes AOptix Technologies for its Pioneering Contribution to Security through Noninvasive Biometrics

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., Oct. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Based on its recent analysis of the noninvasive biometrics market, Frost & Sullivan presents AOptix Technologies Inc. with the 2008 North American Award for Technology Innovation in recognition of its development of an adaptive optics-based stand-o...

When particles are so small that they seep right through skin

Scientists are finding that particles that are barely there tiny objects known as nanoparticles that have found a home in electronics, food containers, sunscreens, and a variety of applications can breech our most personal protective barrier: The skin. The particles under scrutiny by Lisa DeL...

Using novel tool, UD researchers dig through cell 'trash' and find treasure

A person's trash can reveal valuable information, as detectives, historians and identity thieves well know. Likewise, a cell's "trash" may yield certain treasures, University of Delaware researchers have found. Using a new technique they developed, scientists at UD's Delaware Biotechnology Inst...

Improving industry efficiency through environmental innovations

Innovations and the Environment provides strong evidence that companies can reduce emissions at socially acceptable costs. The author, Yoram Krozer, General Director of the Cartesius Institute (the Dutch technical universities' Institute for Sustainable Innovations), shows that the technology ex...

Seeing through the skin

Feeling blue? According to Prof. Leonid Yaroslavsky from Tel Aviv University, the saying may be more than just a metaphor. Prof. Yaroslavsky believes that humans may have an ability to "see" colors and shapes with their skin. His optic-less imaging model is presented in a chapter of a new book,...

Remote technology sees through ice, snow and hot air to monitor power plants

On Aug. 14, 2003, the power grid failure that left the northeastern United States in darkness surprised a country unaccustomed to interrupted electricity. Expectations of a plentiful energy supply in the United States contrast dramatically to the situation in some developing countries that lim...

Slipping through cell walls, nanotubes deliver high-potency punch to cancer tumors in mice

The problem with using a shotgun to kill a housefly is that even if you get the pest, you'll likely do a lot of damage to your home in the process. Hence the value of the more surgical flyswatter. Cancer researchers have long faced a similar situation in chemotherapy: how to get the most medica...

The epigenetics of increasing weight through the generations

Overweight mothers give birth to offspring who become even heavier, resulting in amplification of obesity across generations, said Baylor College of Medicine researchers in Houston who found that chemical changes in the ways genes are expressed a phenomenon called epigenetics -- could affect succ...

Study shows quantum dots can penetrate skin through minor abrasions

Researchers at North Carolina State University have found that quantum dot nanoparticles can penetrate the skin if there is an abrasion, providing insight into potential workplace concerns for healthcare workers or individuals involved in the manufacturing of quantum dots or doing research on pote...

Treating chronic pain, migraine & muscle spasticity through inhibition of neurotransmitter glutamate

LA JOLLA, CA, June 20, 2008 A Webinar hosted by TorreyPines Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: TPTX) at 11 a.m. EDT on June 25 will bring together industry experts to discuss the opportunity of treating chronic pain, migraine and muscle spasticity through the inhibition of the neurotransmitter glutamat...

Nitrogen retained through loss

The nitrogen cycle plays a major role in seagrass fields. Dutch researcher Arie Vonk studied the nitrogen dynamics of seagrasses in Indonesia. He discovered that the interaction between seagrasses, animals and microorganisms results in an efficient nitrogen cycle in tropical seagrass fields. Conse...

New whale detection buoys will help ships take the right way through marine habitat

Researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Bioacoustics Research Program (BRP) at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have teamed up with an international energy company and federal regulators to listen for and help protect endangered North Atlantic right whales in New Eng...

Effective cancer immune therapy through order in the blood vessels

Immune therapies are considered very promising in cancer medicine: Tumor-fighting immune cells are supposed to invade tumor tissue and eliminate cancer cells right there. Although this works well in the test tube, clinical application often fails because immune cells are unable to get into the tum...

Department of Energy putting power in the hands of consumers through technology

The Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory announced today the results of a year-long effort to put the power grid in the hands of consumers through technology. The Pacific Northwest GridWise Demonstration Project found that advanced technologies enable consumers to be active...

Lockheed Martin Advances Biometrics Portfolio Through Cooperation Agreement With Cognitec

Partnership with Facial Recognition Expert Supports Open, Innovative Solutions GAITHERSBURG, Md., Dec. 18 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] further advanced its capabilities and offerings in biometrics solutions through a cooperation agreemen...

Looking through the eyes of a mouse, scientists monitor circulating cells in its bloodstream

WASHINGTON, Dec. 3 A team of researchers from the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have developed an optical device that allows them to peer through the eyes of a mouse and monitor the cells passing through its bloodstream. ...

ACT Ensures Integrity of Testing Process Through Deployment of BIO-key's(R) Biometric ID Technology

Testing Organization Deploying Fingerprint Biometrics To Validate Identities, Eliminate ID Theft WALL, N.J., Oct. 22 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- BIO-key International, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: BKYI) a leader in finger-based biometric identification and wireless public saf...

West Nile virus' spread through nerve cells linked to serious complication

Oct. 18, 2007 -- Scientists believe they have found an explanation for a puzzling and serious complication of West Nile virus infection. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Utah State University showed that West Nile virus can enter a nerve cell, replicate an...

Rhythmic breathing adapts to external beat through 'brain calculus'

CAMBRIDGE, Mass, Sept. 12, 2007 The same kind of learning that allows humans to get used to a subtle touch or persistent odor may also help human vital signs adapt to medical interventions such as mechanical ventilation. The team, led by Chi-Sang Poon, a research scientist at the Harvard-MIT ...
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