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Study links virus to some cases of common skin cancer

COLUMBUS, Ohio A virus discovered last year in a rare form of skin cancer has also been found in people with the second most common form of skin cancer among Americans, according to researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research In...

New supercomputer to reel in answers to some of Earth's problems

RICHLAND, Wash. -- The newest supercomputer in town is almost 15 times faster than its predecessor and ready to take on problems in areas such as climate science, hydrogen storage and molecular chemistry. The $21.4 million Chinook supercomputer was built by HP, tested by a variety of researchers, ...

Nitrogen research shows how some plants invade, take over others

Biologists know that when plants battle for space, often the actual battle is for getting the nitrogen. Now, research at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln gives important new information on how plants can change "nitrogen cycling" to gain nitrogen and how this allows plant species to invade an...

System that regulates blood pressure is amiss in some healthy, young blacks

AUGUSTA, Ga. When stress increases blood pressure, a natural mechanism designed to bring it down by excreting more salt in the urine doesn't work well in about one-third of healthy, black adolescents, researchers report. They hope the finding, which is being presented May 8 at the American Soc...

Exposure to insecticide may play role in obesity epidemic among some women

EAST LANSING, Mich. Prenatal exposure to an insecticide commonly used up until the 1970s may play a role in the obesity epidemic in women, according to a new study involving several Michigan State University researchers. More than 250 mothers who live along and eat fish from Lake Michigan were...

At WPI, some students are learning it's OK to peek

WORCESTER, Mass. There was a time when peeking at another student's work during class was a problem. Then again, there was a time when only televisions had clickers, not classrooms. Starting in January, not only do students in the undergraduate biology lab sections at Worcester Polytechnic Ins...

Cell-building discovery could reduce need for some animal research

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] Brown University biomedical engineers can now grow and assemble living microtissues into complex three-dimensional structures in a way that will advance the field of tissue engineering and may eventually reduce the need for certain kinds of animal research. ...

Anakinra for rheumatoid arthritis: A modest benefit with some risk

New research supports a modest beneficial effect of anakinra for rheumatoid arthritis patients, but warns against potential risks for serious infections and its use with other biologic medications. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting as many as one in 100 people wor...

Pregnant women with asthma can be more confident about some medicines

Budesonide sprays can be regarded as safe for pregnancy - other asthma drugs have not been as well studied though Women can usually keep using the same asthma drugs they were using before they got pregnant. Budesonide sprays are the best studied and can be regarded as safe. More trials of ot...

Researchers learn that some 'good cholesterol' isn't good enough

If you think your levels of "good cholesterol" are good enough, a new study published in the December 2008 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that you may want to think again. In the report, researchers from the University of Chicago challenge the conventional wisdom that simply having high lev...

Drops in blood oxygen levels may be key to sudden death in some epilepsy patients

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) A new study by researchers at UC Davis Medical Center suggests that the sudden unexplained deaths of some epilepsy patients may be a result of their brains not telling their bodies to breathe during seizures. "Significant drops in blood oxygen levels are more common than w...

Case Western Reserve University uncovers genetic basis for some birth defects

CLEVELAND November 10, 2008 A multidisciplinary research team at Case Western Reserve University led by Gary Landreth, Ph.D., a professor in the School of Medicine's Department of Neurosciences, has uncovered a common genetic pathway for a number of birth defects that affect the development of th...

Ecologists say metabolism accounts for why natural selection favors only some species

RIVERSIDE, Calif. Why are some species of plants and animals favored by natural selection? And why does natural selection not favor other species similarly? According to a UC Riverside-led research team, the answer lies in the rate of metabolism of a species how fast a species consumes energy...

Syracuse University researchers discover new way to attack some forms of leukemia

Each year, some 29,000 adults and 2,000 children are diagnosed with leukemia, a form of cancer that is caused by the abnormal production of white blood cells in the bone marrow. Current treatments rely primarily on killing the cancer cells, which also destroys normal cells. But what if a way could...

Brown scientist finds coastal dead zones may benefit some species

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] Coastal dead zones, an increasing concern to ecologists, the fishing industry and the public, may not be as devoid of life after all. A Brown scientist has found that dead zones do indeed support marine life, and that at least one commercially valuable clam act...

H. Pylori bacteria may help prevent some esophageal cancers

PHILADELPHIA Some bacteria may help protect against the development of a type of esophageal cancer, known as adenocarcinoma, according to a new review of the medical literature. These bacteria, which are called Helicobacter pylori, live in the stomachs of humans. The review, published in t...

Why some primates, but not humans, can live with immunodeficiency viruses and not progress to AIDS

Key differences in immune system signaling and the production of specific immune regulatory molecules may explain why some primates are able to live with an immunodeficiency virus infection without progressing to AIDS-like illness, unlike other primate species, including rhesus macaques and humans...

Mate selection more biologically determined in some human populations

Some human populations may rely on biological factors in addition to social factors when selecting a mate. In a recent study, published September 12 in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics, scientists in China, France, and the United Kingdom report genomic data showing that immunity traits may...

Genes may make some people more prone to anxiety

WASHINGTON Inborn differences may help explain why trauma gives some people bad memories and others the nightmare of post-traumatic stress. Scientists in Germany and the United States have reported evidence linking genes to anxious behavior. The findings appear in the August issue of Behavioral N...

Chronic exposure to estrogen impairs some cognitive functions

University of Illinois researchers report this week that chronic exposure to estradiol, the main estrogen in the body, diminishes some cognitive functions. Rats exposed to a steady dose of estradiol were impaired on tasks involving working memory and response inhibition, the researchers found. ...

Syracuse University scientists discover how some bacteria may steal iron from their human hosts

Like their human hosts, bacteria need iron to survive and they must obtain that iron from the environment. While humans obtain iron primarily through the food they eat, bacteria have evolved complex and diverse mechanisms to allow them access to iron. A Syracuse University research team led by Ro...

New study finds that some plants can adapt to widespread climate change

While many plant species move to a new location or go extinct as a result of climate change, grasslands clinging to a steep, rocky dale-side in Northern England seem to defy the odds and adapt to long-term changes in temperature and rainfall, according to a new study by scientists from Syracuse Un...

Birds migrate earlier, but some may be left behind as the climate warms rapidly

Many birds are arriving earlier each spring as temperatures warm along the East Coast of the United States. However, the farther those birds journey, the less likely they are to keep pace with the rapidly changing climate. Scientists at Boston University and the Manomet Center for Conservation ...

UIC scientists discover how some bacteria survive antibiotics

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered how some bacteria can survive antibiotic treatment by turning on resistance mechanisms when exposed to the drugs. The findings, published in the April 24 issue of the journal Molecular Cell, could lead to more effective antibioti...

For some who have lost their sense of smell, a once popular asthma drug could help

SAN DIEGO, CA -- Despite the fact that millions of Americans are believed to have lost their sense of smell (hyposmia), no effective method exists to treat many of these people. That is due in part to the fact that the causes of smell loss are varied and complex, ranging from chronic allergies, vi...

Answer to troublesome question of why some genetic assoc. studies have failed replication attempts

Boston, MA - A team of researchers from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), and elsewhere have described a possible reason why some studies have been unable to replicate associations between genes and traits -- namely that the strength of a gene/trait associ...

Climate changing gas from some surprising microbial liaisons

The climate changing gas dimethyl sulphide (DMS) is being made by microbes at the rate of more than 200 million tonnes a year in the worlds seas, scientists heard today (Tuesday 1 April 2008) at the Society for General Microbiologys 162nd meeting being held this week at the Edinburgh International...

When she's turned on, some of her genes turn off

AUSTIN, TexasWhen a female is attracted to a male, entire suites of genes in her brain turn on and off, show biologists from The University of Texas at Austin studying swordtail fish. Molly Cummings and Hans Hofmann found that some genes were turned on when females found a male attractive, but...

New test finds diisobutyl phthalate in some cardboard food packaging -- recycling is the issue

A new test can identify take-away paper-based food containers (such as pizza boxes) that break phthalate safety rules. The phthalates (plasticisers) are present because the containers were made from pulp that contained at least some recycled paper and cardboard. In Italy, where the test was develo...

Are some men predisposed to pedophilia?

October 22, 2007 (TORONTO) Height may point to a biological basis for pedophilia, according to new research released by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). The study found that pedophilic males were shorter on average than males without a sexual attraction to children. The stud...

Scientists find predisposition to bronchiolitis in some babies

LIVERPOOL, UK 19 October 2007: Scientists have found that a large proportion of infants who suffer from bronchiolitis have an inherent pre-disposition to the disease. The disease is the most prevalent acute wheezing disorder in infants and is the most common cause of admission to hospital in ...

Study shows some athletic men may risk low bone density

COLUMBIA, Mo. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, osteoporosis affects more than 2 million men in the United States and nearly 12 million more have osteopeniaclinically significant low bone density that is less severe than osteoporosis. Now, a new study from the University of Miss...

MIT model could improve some drugs' effectiveness

CAMBRIDGE, MA--MIT researchers have developed a computer modeling approach that could improve a class of drugs based on antibodies, molecules key to the immune system. The model can predict structural changes in an antibody that will improve its effectiveness. The team has already used the mod...

First orchid fossil puts showy blooms at some 80 million years old

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Biologists at Harvard University have identified the ancient fossilized remains of a pollen-bearing bee as the first hint of orchids in the fossil record, a find they say suggests orchids are old enough to have co-existed with dinosaurs. Their analysis, published this week i...

New 'chemically-sensitive MRI scan' may bypass some invasive diagnostic tests in next decade

A new chemical compound which could remove the need for patients to undergo certain invasive diagnostic tests in the future has been created by scientists at Durham University. Research published in the academic journal, Chemical Communications, reveals that this new compound could be used in a...

Cigarette after Valentine snuggle deadlier for some

The proverbial cigarette after a Valentines Day snuggle can prematurely end a love affair, as new evidence emerges that a common defect in a gene significantly increases a smokers risk of an early heart attack. Researchers say that as much as 60 to 70 percent of the population has a gene defect t...

Herpes infection may be symbiotic, help beat back some bacteria

Mice with chronic herpes virus infections can better resist the bacterium that causes plague and a bacterium that causes one kind of food poisoning, researchers report in this week's Nature. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis attributed the surprising finding to c...

NIDA study identifies genes that might help some people abstain from smoking

Scientists supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, have for the first time identified genes that might increase a person’s ability to abstain from smoking. The breakthrough research was conducted by Dr. George Uhl at NIDA’s Intramural Res...

Stanford-led study closes in on genes that may predispose some people to severe depression

Some people appear to be genetically predisposed to developing severe depression, but researchers have yet to pin down the genes responsible. Now, a specific region rife with promise has been located on one chromosome by a consortium of researchers working under Douglas Levinson, MD, professo...

Study suggests some drug resistance to influenza B medications

Use of certain common antiviral drugs during a recent influenza B epidemic in Japan showed the development of viruses with partial resistance to the drugs, according to a study in the April 4 issue of JAMA. Two antiviral drugs, zanamivir and oseltamivir, which are a type of drugs known as neurami...
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