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K-State researchers say after-school programs should promote activity, healthy nutrition

Children's after-school activities often consist of sedentary behavior such as watching television, but after-school programs that offer physical activity and healthy snacks could be the best place for children's health. David Dzewaltowski, head of the department of kinesiology at Kansas State ...

Antibody targeting of glioblastoma shows promise in preclinical tests, say Lombardi researchers

Washington, DC Cancer researchers at Georgetown University's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center have successfully tested a small, engineered antibody they say shuts down growth of human glioblastoma tumors in cell and animal studies. Glioblastoma is the deadliest of brain cancers; there is no e...

Smaller plants punch above their weight in the forest, say Queen's biologists

New findings from Queen's University biologists show that in the plant world, bigger isn't necessarily better. "Until now most of the thinking has suggested that to be a good competitor in the forest, you have to be a big plant," says Queen's Biology professor Lonnie Aarssen. "But our research...

Cleaning up oil spills can kill more fish than spills themselves, say Queen's biologists

Kingston, ON A new Queen's University study shows that detergents used to clean up spills of diesel oil actually increase its toxicity to fish, making it more harmful. "The detergents may be the best way to treat spills in the long term because the dispersed oil is diluted and degraded," says...

Climate change affecting Europe's birds now, say researchers

Climate change is already having a detectable impact on birds across Europe, says a Durham University and RSPB-led scientific team publishing their findings to create the world's first indicator of the climate change impacts on wildlife at a continental scale. Published in the journal PLoS ONE...

Substantial work ahead for water issues, say scientists at ACS' Final Report briefing

WASHINGTON, Jan. 27, 2009 Scientists and engineers will face a host of obstacles over the next decade in providing clean water to millions of people caught up in a water shortage crisis, a panel of scientists and engineers said today at a briefing at the Broadcast Center of the National Press Bui...

Key to future medical breakthroughs is systems biology, say leading European scientists

Crucial breakthroughs in the treatment of many common diseases such as diabetes and Parkinson's could be achieved by harnessing a powerful scientific approach called systems biology, according to leading scientists from across Europe. In a Science Policy Briefing released today by the European Sci...

New World post-pandemic reforestation helped start Little Ice Age, say Stanford scientists

The power of viruses is well documented in human history. Swarms of little viral Davids have repeatedly laid low the great Goliaths of human civilization, most famously in the devastating pandemics that swept the New World during European conquest and settlement. In recent years, there has been...

Ecologists say metabolism accounts for why natural selection favors only some species

RIVERSIDE, Calif. Why are some species of plants and animals favored by natural selection? And why does natural selection not favor other species similarly? According to a UC Riverside-led research team, the answer lies in the rate of metabolism of a species how fast a species consumes energy...

Recommendations for children's exercise lacking say experts

Researchers from the Peninsula Medical School in Plymouth, UK, have carried out research that suggests the one hour of moderate exercise a day recommended to children from health experts may not be enough to tackle the rising problem of childhood obesity. Their research has been published in th...

'1-hit' event provides new opportunity for colon cancer prevention, say Fox Chase researchers

PHILADELPHIA (September 15, 2008) More than 30 years ago, Alfred Knudson Jr., M.D., Ph.D., revolutionized the field of cancer genetics by showing that a person must lose both their paternal and maternal copies of a particular class of cancer-inhibiting genes, called tumor-suppressor genes, in ord...

Curbing coal emissions alone might avert climate danger, say researchers

An ongoing rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide from burning of fossil fuels might be kept below harmful levels if emissions from coal are phased out within the next few decades, say researchers. They say that less plentiful oil and gas should be used sparingly as well, but that far greater sup...

The drivers of tropical deforestation are changing, say scientists

A shift from poverty-driven to industry-driven deforestation threatens the world's tropical forests but offers new opportunities for conservation, according to an article coauthored by William Laurance of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. "New Strategies for Conserving Tropica...

Recurrence of group B strep high in subsequent pregnancies, say UT Houston obstetricians

A new study by researchers at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston could help experts better decide whether to continue the current practice of retesting women during their second pregnancies for a common bacterial infection if they had tested positive for the infection previously. ...

Brain stem cells can be awakened, say Schepens scientists

Boston, MAScientists at Schepens Eye Research Institute have identified specific molecules in the brain that are responsible for awakening and putting to sleep brain stem cells, which, when activated, can transform into neurons (nerve cells) and repair damaged brain tissue. Their findings are publ...

Brown scientists say biodiversity is crucial to ecosystem productivity

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] - In the first experiment involving a natural environment, scientists at Brown University have shown that richer plant diversity significantly enhances an ecosystem's productivity. The finding underscores the benefits of biodiversity, such as capturing carbon d...

Sierra Nevada rose to current height earlier than thought, say Stanford geologists

Geologists studying deposits of volcanic glass in the western United States have found that the central Sierra Nevada largely attained its present elevation 12 million years ago, roughly 8 or 9 million years earlier than commonly thought. The finding has implications not only for understanding ...

Sudden 'ecosystem flips' imperil world's poorest regions, say water experts

This release is available in French . Modern agriculture and land-use practices may lead to major disruptions of the worlds water flows, with potentially sudden and dire consequences for regions least able to cope with them researchers at the Stockholm University-affiliated Stockholm Resi...

Texas A&M scientists say early Americans arrived earlier

COLLEGE STATION A team led by two Texas A&M University anthropologists now believes the first Americans came to this country 1,000 to 2,000 years earlier than the 13,500 years ago previously thought, which could shift historic timelines. The teams findings are outlined in a review article in ...

Policing cells demand ID to tell friend from foe, say University of Pennsylvania cell engineers

University of Pennsylvania scientists studying macrophages, the biological cells that spring from white blood cells to eat and destroy foreign or dying cells, have discovered how these policemen differentiate between friend and foe. The paper appears as the cover article in the March 10 editio...

Learning how to say 'no' to alcohol advertising and peer pressure works for inner-city adolescents

NEW YORK (Feb. 29, 2008) -- Teens who can recognize and resist the persuasive tactics used in alcohol ads are less likely to succumb to alcohol advertising and peer pressure to drink. The results of a three-year study of inner-city middle school students by Weill Cornell Medical College researc...

Stanford researchers say living corals thousands of years old hold clues to past climate changes

Using radiocarbon dating and samples of deep-sea corals snipped from the floor of the Pacific Ocean by a submersible, researchers from Stanford and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have discovered that deep-sea corals growing off Hawaii are much older than previously thoughtsome as old as 4,...

Stanford researchers say climate change will significantly increase impending bird extinctions

Where do you go when you've reached the top of a mountain and you can't go back down? It's a question increasingly relevant to plants and animals, as their habitats slowly shift to higher elevations, driven by rising temperatures worldwide. The answer, unfortunately, is you can't go anywhere. H...

T. rex quicker than Becks, say scientists

T. rex may have struggled to chase down speeding vehicles as the movie Jurassic Park would have us believe but the worlds most fearsome carnivore was certainly no slouch, research out today suggests. The University of Manchester study used a powerful supercomputer to calculate the running speed...

Biodiversity itself begets a species cascade, researchers say

EAST LANSING, Mich. Biodiversity feeds on itself, researchers found, as evolving animals open niches for other new species. Such is the case, says a Michigan State University researcher, with a parasite found to be evolving in sequence with an emerging host insect in western Michigan apple trees....

No quick or easy technological fix for climate change, researchers say

Global warming, some have argued, can be reversed with a large-scale "geoengineering" fix, such as having a giant blimp spray liquefied sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere or building tens of millions of chemical filter systems in the atmosphere to filter out carbon dioxide. But Richard Turco...

Rooted plants move mysteriously down greenways, scientists say

GAINESVILLE, Fla. The wild pea pod is big and heavy, with seemingly little prayer of escaping the shade of its parent plant. And yet, like a grounded teenager who knows where the car keys are hidden, it manages if it has a reasonable chance of escape. University of Florida researchers work...

Circadian clock may be critical for remembering what you learn, Stanford researchers say

The circadian rhythm that quietly pulses inside us all, guiding our daily cycle from sleep to wakefulness and back to sleep again, may be doing much more than just that simple metronomic task, according to Stanford researchers. Working with Siberian hamsters, biologist Norman Ruby has shown tha...

More research needed to make good on biofuel promise, experts say

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - While cellulosic biofuels derived from grasses, crop residues and inedible plant parts have real potential to be more efficient and environmentally friendly than grain-based biofuels like corn ethanol, more research and science-based policies are needed to reap these benefit...

Best way to treat malaria: Avoid using same drug for everyone, scientists say

A team of scientists employing a sophisticated computer model pioneered at Princeton University and Resources for the Future has found that many governments worldwide are recommending the wrong kind of malaria treatment. Despite the availability of many drugs and therapies to treat malaria, man...

Water is 'designer fluid' that helps proteins change shape, scientists say

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. According to new research, old ideas about water behavior are all wet. Ubiquitous on Earth, water also has been found in comets, on Mars and in molecular clouds in interstellar space. Now, scientists say this common fluid is not as well understood as we thought. "Water, as we kn...

Male seahorses are nature's Mr. Mom, Texas A&M researchers say

COLLEGE STATION Male seahorses are natures real-life Mr. Moms they take fathering to a whole new level: Pregnancy. Although it is common for male fish to play the dominant parenting role, male pregnancy is a complex process unique to the fish family Syngnathidae, which includes pipefish, sea...

Male seahorses are nature's Mr. Mom, Texas A&M researchers say

COLLEGE STATION Male seahorses are natures real-life Mr. Moms they take fathering to a whole new level: Pregnancy. Although it is common for male fish to play the dominant parenting role, male pregnancy is a complex process unique to the fish family Syngnathidae, which includes pipefish, sea...

Sunflower debate ends in Mexico, researchers say

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- Ancient farmers were growing sunflowers in Mexico more than 4,000 years before the Spaniards arrived, according to a team of researchers that includes Florida State University anthropologist Mary D. Pohl. In an article published in the journal PNAS (Proceedings of the Natio...

War between the sexes begins before twins' birth, TAU researchers say

The battle of the sexes may begin in the womb, researchers from Tel Aviv University believe. And it may have troubling consequences a male twin can compromise the health of his twin sister before she is born. In a new study recently published in the journal Pediatrics, the researchers analyze...

Genes hold the key to how happy we are, scientists say

Happiness in life is as much down to having the right genetic mix as it is to personal circumstances according to a recent study. Psychologists at the University of Edinburgh working with researchers at Queensland Institute for Medical Research in Australia found that happiness is partly determ...

Madagascar's tortoises are crawling toward extinction, groups say

NEW YORK (FEBRUARY 7, 2008) Madagascars turtles and tortoises, which rank among the most endangered reptiles on earth, will continue to crawl steadily toward extinction unless major conservation measure are enacted, according to a recent assessment by the Wildlife Conservation Society and other ...

Hot springs microbes hold key to dating sedimentary rocks, researchers say

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Scientists studying microbial communities and the growth of sedimentary rock at Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park have made a surprising discovery about the geological record of life and the environment. Their discovery could affect how certain sequences of sedimen...

Chemicals used as fire retardants could be harmful, UC-Riverside researchers say

RIVERSIDE, Calif. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), chemicals used as fire retardants, can be found in numerous items in the home, such as the television, computer, toaster and the sofa. Now, as reported in a KNBC story on Nov. 28 , they are being found in alarming concentrations, in huma...

Now is Africa's turn for a green revolution, global experts say

Three years after the United Nations called for a Green Revolution in Africa, a renowned group of speakers will share the promise of fighting hunger in Africa through agricultural productivity. They will cover sustainable agriculture, nutrition, environment, markets and policies in the continent d...
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