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Obama administration announces more than $327 million in Recovery Act funding for science research

Washington, D.C. U.S Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that more than $327 million in new funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will go toward scientific research, instrumentation, and laboratory infrastructure projects. Ten of DOE's national laboratories...

Martin Hensen, head of e-strategies, UCB Germany: Making e-marketing more than just an add-on

London, August 3, 2009 / b3c newswire / - With the vast majority of our marketing efforts focused squarely on the sales force, e-marketing is still an add on, says Martin Hensen, head of e-strategies, UCB Germany. But successful e-CRM strategies are the basic starting point for all e-activities, h...

Health benefits of physical activity more pronounced in women

Many experimental studies have found that physical exercise can improve cholesterol levels and subsequently decrease the risks of cardiovascular disease; however, few of these studies have included enough participant diversity to provide ethnic breakdowns. Now, a long-term study of over 8,700 midd...

Freshwater fish at the top of the food chain evolve more slowly

Durham, NC For avid fishermen and anglers, the largemouth bass is a favorite freshwater fish with an appetite for minnows. A new study finds that once they evolved to eat other fish, largemouth bass and fellow fish-feeders have remained relatively unchanged compared with their insect- and snail-e...

Ants more rational than humans

In a study released online on July 22 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society: Biological Sciences , researchers at Arizona State University and Princeton University show that ants can accomplish a task more rationally than our multimodal, egg-headed, tool-using, bipedal, opposing-thumbe...

Tires made from trees -- better, cheaper, more fuel efficient

CORVALLIS, Ore. Automobile owners around the world may some day soon be driving on tires that are partly made out of trees which could cost less, perform better and save on fuel and energy. Wood science researchers at Oregon State University have made some surprising findings about the potent...

Flexible neck in cell-receptor DC-SIGN targets more pathogens

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Pathogen recognition is the foundation of the body's immune response and survival against infection. A small cell-receptor protein called DC-SIGN is part of the immune system, and recognizes certain pathogens, including those responsible for Ebola, Dengue fever and HIV. How the mo...

Probiotics help gastric-bypass patients lose weight more quickly, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. New research from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Hospital & Clinics suggests that the use of a dietary supplement after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery can help obese patients to more quickly lose weight and to avoid deficiency of a critical B vitamin. ...

Happier, healthier, more productive hens on omega-3?

Most of us are aware of the potential health benefits of omega-3 found in fish oil and flax seed. Now researchers are looking at how omega-3 may help laying hens avoid bone damage. A grant of 1.7 million has been awarded to Dr John Tarlton of the University of Bristol's Matrix Biology Researc...

New theory gives more precise estimates of large-scale biodiversity

Ask biologists how many species live in a pond, a grassland, a mountain range or on the entire planet, and the answers get increasingly vague. Hence the wide range of estimates for the planet's biodiversity, predicted to be between 2 million and 50 million species. A new way of estimating speci...

Faster, more cost-effective DNA test for crime scenes, disease diagnosis

Scientists in Japan are reporting development of a faster, less expensive version of the fabled polymerase chain reaction (PCR) a DNA test widely used in criminal investigations, disease diagnosis, biological research and other applications. The new method could lead to expanded use of PCR in medi...

Scientists are learning more about big birds from feathers

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Catching adult eagles for research purposes is no easy task, but a Purdue University researcher has found a way around the problem, and, in the process, gathered even more information about the birds without ever laying a hand on one. "Many birds are small, easy to catch ...

Pacific Northwest forests could store more carbon, help address greenhouse issues

CORVALLIS, Ore. The forests of the Pacific Northwest hold significant potential to increase carbon storage and help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in coming years, a recent study concludes, if they are managed primarily for that purpose through timber harvest reductions and increased rotation ...

Harvard scientists solve mystery about why HIV patients are more susceptible to TB infection

A team of Harvard scientists has taken an important first step toward the development of new treatments to help people with HIV battle Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) infection. In their report, appearing in the July 2009 print issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology ( http://www.jleukbio.or...

West Coast needs more research on fisheries, marine science, climate change

According to a new report on regional marine research and information needs, the West Coast critically needs more research about fisheries, ocean health, coastal hazards and climate change - among other topics - to support and protect the region's annual $32-billion ocean-related economy, accordin...

Changing climate likely to make 'super weed' even more powerful

Researchers at the University of Delaware have discovered a new reason why the tall, tasseled reed Phragmites australis is one of the most invasive plants in the United States. The UD research team found that Phragmites delivers a one-two chemical knock-out punch to snuff out its victims, a...

In the turf war against seaweed, coral reefs more resilient than expected

There's little doubt that coral reefs the world over face threats on many fronts: pollution, diseases, destructive fishing practices and warming oceans. But reefs appear to be more resistant to one potential menace seaweed than previously thought, according to new research by a team of marine sc...

Web-based program designs more efficient farm terrace layouts

COLUMBIA, Mo. From the time of the Babylonians to the Incas, terracing has been used to prevent water from eroding steep and hilly croplands. Designing terrace layouts can be time consuming and labor intensive. Now, University of Missouri researchers are developing a Web-based program that will de...

Komodo even more deadly than thought: Research

The carnivorous reptiles ( Varanus komodoensis ) are known to bite prey and release them, leaving them to bleed to death from their wounds: the victims are reported to go into shock before the dragons kill and eat them. Some researchers believe that prey are killed by pathogenic bacteria in th...

Study finds homicidal poisoning rising, more likely in infants and elderly

Athens, Ga. Homicidal poisonings are rare but on the riseand infants are the most common victimsaccording to a new University of Georgia study that aims to raise awareness of this often overlooked crime. Greene Shepherd, clinical professor in the UGA College of Pharmacy, and recent graduate B...

Study finds children's activity levels not influenced by more PE time in school

Amsterdam, the Netherlands: Scheduling more physical education time in schools does not mean children will increase their activity levels, suggests new research that discovered those who got lots of timetabled exercise at school compensated by doing less at home while those who got little at schoo...

Consumers more likely to identify healthy food using traffic light nutrition labels

Amsterdam, the Netherlands: Consumers are five times more likely to identify healthy food when they see colour-coded traffic light nutrition labels than when labels present the information numerically by showing what percentage of the recommended daily nutrient intake each portion provides, new re...

Women more vulnerable to tobacco carcinogens, new results show

Women may be more vulnerable than men to the cancer-causing effects of smoking tobacco, according to new results reported this week at the European Multidisciplinary Conference in Thoracic Oncology (EMCTO), Lugano, Switzerland. Swiss researchers studied 683 lung cancer patients who were referr...

People of higher socioeconomic status choose better diets -- but pay more per calorie

St. Louis, MO, May 1, 2009 As people become more educated, studies have demonstrated that they tend to choose foods that are lower in calories but higher in nutrients. They also pay more. In a study published in the May 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association , researchers...

Older men more likely than women to die after pneumonia

PITTSBURGH, April 29 Differing biological response to infection between men and women may explain higher death rates among older men who are hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The findings, published online in the Critical Care Medicine journal, may have important implication...

Athletes with asthma need more help from their team trainers

COLUMBUS, Ohio Very few athletic trainers associated with National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) programs said that they were following best practice standards for managing asthma among their athletes, according to a new study. For athletes with asthma, the dangers of the condition ca...

DNA blueprint for healthier and more efficient cows

Ground breaking findings by an international consortium of scientists who sequenced and analysed the bovine genome, could result in more sustainable food production. The findings, published in two reports in the journal Science today, will have a profound impact on Australia's livestock indus...

Concordia University receives more than $22 million for genomics research

Montreal, April 20, 2009 Concordia University is pleased to announce that researchers Adrian Tsang and Vincent Martin of the Centre for Structural and Functional Genomics have been awarded more than $22 million to further advance the innovative genome research being conducted at Concordia. This ...

Study reveals potential to amass more carbon in eastern North American forests

MADISON With climate change looming, the hunt for places that can soak up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is on. Obvious "sinks" for the greenhouse gas include the oceans and the enormous trees of tropical rainforests. But temperate forests also play a role, and new research now suggests t...

Feather color is more than skin deep

Carotenoids have important physiological functions, including antioxidant, immunomodulating, and photoprotectant properties. Carotenoid pigments are also used by many bird species as colorants, and are responsible for most of their red, orange and yellow coloration. In particular, carotenoid-red c...

Study reveals potential to amass more carbon in eastern North American forests

MADISON With climate change looming, the hunt for places that can soak up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is on. Obvious "sinks" for the greenhouse gas include the oceans and the enormous trees of tropical rainforests. But temperate forests also play a role, and new research now suggests t...

Astronauts may need more intense workouts to maintain muscle fitness in space

MUNCIE, Ind. A new study in the The Journal of Applied Physiology , suggests that astronauts need to modify their workouts to avoid extensive muscle loss during missions onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The latest NASA-sponsored research from Ball State University's Human Perfor...

Rensselaer receives more than $2 million from New York State to fund stem cell research

Troy, N.Y. Two groups of Rensselaer researchers each have received a $1.08 million grant from New York through the state's stem cell research initiative. Both grants will fund research on the growth and development of stem cells and will provide some of the first insights available into the role ...

Molecular fingerprints point the way to earlier cancer diagnosis and more targeted treatment

AUGUSTA, Ga. Metabolites are molecular fingerprints of what your cells are up to and Dr. Arun Sreekumar wants to know the impression made by cancer. You've likely heard about metabolites; your physician probably screens for some known ones such as triglycerides or cholesterol at your annual ph...

Cleaning up oil spills can kill more fish than spills themselves, say Queen's biologists

Kingston, ON A new Queen's University study shows that detergents used to clean up spills of diesel oil actually increase its toxicity to fish, making it more harmful. "The detergents may be the best way to treat spills in the long term because the dispersed oil is diluted and degraded," says...

A sticky business -- how cancer cells become more 'gloopy' as they die

The viscosity, or 'gloopiness', of different parts of cancer cells increases dramatically when they are blasted with light-activated cancer drugs, according to new images that provide fundamental insights into how cancer cells die, published in Nature Chemistry today (15 March). The images...

Soil and sediment contamination assessment more accurate

The effects of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PACs) on terrestrial and benthic invertebrates are used to estimate the risks of soil and sediment contamination. Effects are assessed exposing the organisms to PACs in life cycle tests. In seventy percent of cases this results in highly predictable ef...

Cleft lip and palate: Genes more important than thought?

Comparing 500,000 snippets of human DNA put scientists from the University of Bonn on the right track. A genetic variant on chromosome 8 occurs with significantly higher frequency in people with cleft lip and palate than in the control group. The results are to be published in the forthcoming iss...

After a few drinks, older adults more impaired than they think

GAINESVILLE, Fla. Older, active people who have a drink or two might be more impaired afterward than they think, according to a report today from a University of Florida research group in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs . Although people 50 or older in the study metabolized alcoho...

Study predicts when invasive species can travel more readily by air

A new study forecasts when climate factors such as temperature, humidity and rainfall will match at geographically distant airline departure and destination points, which could help to shuffle invasive species, and the diseases they may carry, across the globe along existing flight routes. The fin...
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