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Research shows rates of severe childhood obesity have tripled

WINSTON-SALEM Rates of severe childhood obesity have tripled in the last 25 years, putting many children at risk for diabetes and heart disease, according to a report in Academic Pediatrics by an obesity expert at Brenner Children's Hospital, part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Cente...

Most older long-term cancer survivors have poor health habits

A new study finds that most older long-term cancer survivors who are interested in diet and exercise actually have poor health habits. The study also reveals that those survivors who do exercise and watch their diet have improved physical health and quality of life. Published in the September 1, ...

When children have breathing problems

La Plata/Leipzig. Increasing numbers of children around the world are suffering from respiratory problems coughing, wheezing and asthma attacks. Although the key external causes of these diseases were identified a long time ago (traffic and industrial air pollution), it had not previously been po...

New research shows dinosaurs may have been smaller than we thought

FAIRFAX, Va., June 24, 2009 For millions of years, dinosaurs have been considered the largest creatures ever to walk on land. While they still maintain this status, a new study suggests that some dinosaurs may actually have weighed as little as half as much as previously thought. In the stud...

Bullies have harassed 14 percent of workers over past 6 months

Although it is a relatively widespread phenomenon, the experts have still not been able to come up with an all-encompassing and precise definition of workplace abuse or bullying. Basing their work on previous literature, David Gonzlez, of the High Court of Justice of Madrid and Jos Lus Graa, of th...

Spring agricultural fires have large impact on melting Arctic

DURHAM, N.H. - Scientists from around the world will convene at the University of New Hampshire June 2-5, 2009, to discuss key findings from the most ambitious effort ever undertaken to measure "short-lived" airborne pollutants in the Arctic and determine how they contribute in the near term to th...

Bolivian rainforest study suggests feeding behavior in monkeys and humans have ancient, shared roots

Behavioural ecologists working in Bolivia have found that wild spider monkeys control their diets in a similar way to humans, contrary to what has been thought up to now. Rather than trying to maximize their daily energy intake, the monkeys tightly regulate their daily protein intake, so that it s...

Babies born to native high-altitude mothers have decreased risk of low birth weight

BETHESDA, Md. (May 18, 2009) Pregnant women who are indigenous to the Andes Mountains deliver more blood and oxygen to their fetuses at high altitude than do women of European descent. The study helps explain why babies of Andean descent born at high altitude weigh more than European babies born a...

Signals from stroking have direct route to brain

Nerve signals that tell the brain that we are being slowly stroked on the skin have their own specialised nerve fibres in the skin. This is shown by a new study from the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. The discovery may explain why touching the skin can relieve pain. The s...

Psychiatric disorders are common in adults who have had anorexia

The study was initiated in 1985. A total of 51 teenagers with anorexia nervosa were studied, together with an equally large control group of healthy persons. The groups have been investigated and compared several times as the years have passed. "This study is unique in an international perspecti...

Uvalde Center water research could have national, international applications

UVALDE Intensifying drought conditions in Texas and other parts of the U.S. plus increasing worldwide water consumption makes ongoing water conservation research at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde even more relevant, said the center's director. "Our research includes...

Scientists find climate change to have paradoxical effects in coastal wetlands

Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide is largely responsible for recent global warming and the rise in sea levels. However, a team of scientists, including two Smithsonian ecologists, have found that this same increase in CO 2 may ironically counterbalance some of its negative effects on one of the p...

MIT: Why we have difficulty recognizing faces in photo negatives

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--Humans excel at recognizing faces, but how we do this has been an abiding mystery in neuroscience and psychology. In an effort to explain our success in this area, researchers are taking a closer look at how and why we fail. A new study from MIT looks at a particularly striki...

Children who are dissatisfied with their appearance often have problems with their peer group

Being satisfied with one's appearance is one of the most important prerequisites for a positive self image. However, in today's appearance culture it is the rule rather than the exception that children and young people are dissatisfied with their appearance. Those children who are teased or subj...

Rising sea levels set to have major impacts around the world

Research presented today at the International Scientific Congress on Climate Change in Copenhagen shows that the upper range of sea level rise by 2100 could be in the range of about one meter, or possibly more. In the lower end of the spectrum it looks increasingly unlikely that sea level rise wil...

Musicians have biological advantage in identifying emotion in sound

EVANSTON, Ill. --- Looking for a mate who in everyday conversation can pick up even your most subtle emotional cues? Find a musician, Northwestern University researchers suggest. In a study in the latest issue of European Journal of Neuroscience , an interdisciplinary Northwestern research te...

Social support during breast-feeding helps humans have more children

COLUMBUS, Ohio The fact that human mothers have support from family while they're breast-feeding may be a key strategy that enables humans to reproduce more rapidly than other primates, new research suggests. Social support helps mothers conserve energy in a way that allows their bodies to pre...

Researchers may have found why women have an edge on salt-sensitive hypertension

AUGUSTA, Ga. Researchers may have found why women have an edge in keeping a healthier balance between the amount of salt they eat and excrete - at least before reaching menopause. Premenopausal women are known to have fewer problems with salt-sensitive hypertension and hypertension in general,...

Tree deaths have doubled across the western US

Tree death rates have more than doubled over the last few decades in old-growth forests of the western United States, and the most probable cause of the worrisome trend is regional warming, according to a U.S. Geological Survey-led (USGS) study published in Science on January 23. The study fo...

Invasions by alien plants have been mapped in European Union

Biological invasions are one of the major threats to biodiversity and in many cases they have considerable impact on economy and human health. For their effective management it is important to understand which areas and ecosystems are at the highest risk of being invaded. The first map of the l...

Research finds older women who are more physically fit have better cognitive function

New research published in the international journal Neurobiology of Aging by Marc Poulin, PhD, DPhil, finds that being physically fit helps the brain function at the top of its game. An Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Senior Scholar, Poulin finds that physical activity benefits ...

Obesity starts in the head? 6 newly discovered genes for obesity have a neural effect

The international GIANT (Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Parameters) consortium works on the discovery of obesity genes. So far, the scientists have analyzed two million DNA variations in 15 genome-wide association studies with a total of more than 32,000 participants. The hereby identifie...

Four, three, two, one . . . pterosaurs have lift off

Pterosaurs have long suffered an identity crisis. Pop culture heedlessly and wrongly lumps these extinct flying lizards in with dinosaurs. Even paleontologists assumed that because the creatures flew, they were birdlike in many ways, such as using only two legs to take flight. Now comes w...

Stronger coastal winds due to climate change may have far-reaching effects

SAN FRANCISCO, CA--Future increases in wind strength along the California coast may have far-reaching effects, including more intense upwelling of cold water along the coast early in the season and increased fire danger in Southern California, according to researchers at the Climate Change and Imp...

Male dinosaurs may have been prehistoric babysitters, study shows

COLLEGE STATION, Dec 18, 2008 Those ferocious Hollywood meat-eating dinosaurs you're used to seeing in the movies very possibly had a much softer side: the males might even have been sort of prehistoric babysitters, according to a far-flung study conducted by a Texas A&M University researcher. ...

Ocean acidification could have broad effects on marine ecosystems

SAN FRANCISCO, CA--Concern about increasing ocean acidification has often focused on its potential effects on coral reefs, but broader disruptions of biological processes in the oceans may be more significant, according to Donald Potts, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the Univer...

Girls have superior sense of taste to boys

New knowledge: Girls have a better sense of taste than boys. Every third child of school age prefers soft drinks which are not sweet. Children and young people love fish and do not think of themselves as being fussy eaters. Boys have a sweeter tooth than girls. And teenagers taste differently. Th...

Ancient magma 'superpiles' may have shaped the continents

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Two giant plumes of hot rock deep within the earth are linked to the plate motions that shape the continents, researchers have found. The two superplumes, one beneath Hawaii and the other beneath Africa, have likely existed for at least 200 million years, explained Wendy Pane...

Irritable bowel syndrome can have genetic causes

Irritations of the bowel can have genetic causes. Researchers at the Institute of Human Genetics at Heidelberg University Hospital have discovered this correlation. The causes of what is known as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, are co...

Worker ants of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but your fertility

This release is available in French . The highly specialized worker castes in ants represent the pinnacle of social organization in the insect world. As in any society, however, ant colonies are filled with internal strife and conflict. So what binds them together? More than 150 years ago...

Children distressed by family fighting have higher stress hormones

Children who become very upset when their parents fight are more likely to develop psychological problems. But little is known about what happens beyond these behavioral reactions in terms of children's biological responses. A new study has found that children who are very distressed when their pa...

Stroke patients soon may have fun, high-tech tool

The University of Central Florida will immerse stroke survivors in a virtual world full of flying insects to help expand their range of movement. Researchers in UCF's Media Convergence Lab (MCL) are teaming up with the California-based Virtual Reality Medical Center (VRMC) to create the progra...

Pregnant women consuming flaxseed oil have high risk of premature birth

A study has found that the risks of a premature birth quadruple if flaxseed oil is consumed in the last two trimesters of pregnancy. The research was conducted by Professor Anick Brard of the Universit de Montral's Faculty of Pharmacy and the Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Center and Master's st...

Yale journal finds nanomaterials may have large environmental footprint

New Haven, Conn.Environmental gains derived from the use of nanomaterials may be offset in part by the process used to manufacture them, according to research published in a special issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology . Hatice Şengl and colleagues at the University of Illinois at ...

Overweight mums have chubby bubs

University of New South Wales (UNSW) research has highlighted a link between childhood obesity and a mother's diet before and during pregnancy. The work in animals proves that overweight expectant mothers are more likely to have babies with more body fat, who are at greater risk of diabetes and li...

Volcanoes may have provided sparks and chemistry for first life

GREENBELT, Md. - Lightning and gases from volcanic eruptions could have given rise to the first life on Earth, according to a new analysis of samples from a classic origin-of-life experiment by NASA and university researchers. The NASA-funded result is the subject of a paper in Science appearing...

UNC study on properties of carbon nanotubes, water could have wide-ranging implications

CHAPEL HILL A fresh discovery about the way water behaves inside carbon nanotubes could have implications in fields ranging from the function of ultra-tiny high-tech devices to scientists' understanding of biological processes, according to researchers from the University of North Carolina at Cha...

New studies find global warming will have significant economic impacts on Florida coasts

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Leading Florida-based scientific researchers released two new studies today, including a Florida State University report finding that climate change will cause significant impacts on Florida's coastlines and economy due to increased sea level rise. A second study by resear...

'Buckyballs' have high potential to accumulate in living tissue

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Research at Purdue University suggests synthetic carbon molecules called fullerenes, or buckyballs, have a high potential of being accumulated in animal tissue, but the molecules also appear to break down in sunlight, perhaps reducing their possible environmental dangers. ...

Premature children 4 times more likely to have behavioral disorders

Children born prematurely are four times more likely to have emotional problems or behavioural disorders, according to research led by the University of Warwick. A team led by the University's Department of Psychology and Warwick Medical School examined the behaviour of 200 six-year-old childre...
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