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EMBO pioneers pension plan for internationally mobile postdoctoral researchers

Heidelberg, Germany, 6 August 2009 The European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) announced today the introduction of a new private pension plan for EMBO Fellows. The plan offers a benefit package that optimally suits the needs of highly mobile scientists. Post-doctoral researchers who are...

Scientists find universal rules for food-web stability

The findings, published in this week's issue of Science , conclude that food-web stability is enhanced when many diverse predator-prey links connect high and intermediate trophic levels. The computations also reveal that small ecosystems follow other rules than large ecosystems: differences in th...

Protein handlers should be effective treatment target for cancer and Alzheimer's

AUGUSTA, Ga. Cancer and Alzheimer's have excess protein in common and scientists say learning more about how proteins are made and eliminated will lead to better treatment for both. Medical College of Georgia researchers Drs. Nahid F. Mivechi and Dimitrios Moskofidis have received two National...

Moving to the US increases cancer risk for Hispanics

PHILADELPHIA Results of a new study confirm trends that different Hispanic population groups have higher incidence rates of certain cancers and worse cancer outcomes if they live in the United States, than they do if they live in their homelands. "Hispanics are not all the same with regard to...

Methods for gene transfer in stem cells featured in Cold Spring Harbor Protocols

COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. (Wed., Aug. 5, 2009) Vectors derived from retroviruses are useful tools for long-term gene transfer because they allow stable integration of transgenes and propagation into daughter cells. Lentiviral vectors are preferred because they can transduce non-proliferating ce...

Obama administration announces more than $327 million in Recovery Act funding for science research

Washington, D.C. U.S Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that more than $327 million in new funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will go toward scientific research, instrumentation, and laboratory infrastructure projects. Ten of DOE's national laboratories...

Pitt researchers find promising candidate protein for cancer prevention vaccines

PITTSBURGH, Aug. 4 Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have learned that some healthy people naturally developed an immune response against a protein that is made in excess levels in many cancers, including breast, lung, and head and neck cancers. The finding suggests t...

The way you eat may affect your risk for breast cancer

PHILADELPHIA How you eat may be just as important as how much you eat, if mice studies are any clue. Cancer researchers have long studied the role of diet on breast cancer risk, but results to date have been mixed. New findings published in Cancer Prevention Research , a journal of the Ameri...

Holding breath for several minutes elevates marker for brain damage

BETHESDA, Md. (August 4, 2009) Divers who held their breath for several minutes had elevated levels of a protein that can signal brain damage, according to a new study from the Journal of Applied Physiology . However, the appearance of the protein, S100B, was transient and leaves open the questi...

New hope for fisheries

Scientists have joined forces in a groundbreaking assessment on the status of marine fisheries and ecosystems. The two-year study, led by Boris Worm of Dalhousie University and Ray Hilborn of the University of Washington and including an international team of 19 co-authors, shows that steps taken ...

Leicester research paves way for first use in Europe of an insect to fight invasive plant

Researchers at the University of Leicester have paved the way for the first ever use in Europe of an insect (biocontrol) to combat an invasive plant species in Britain. University of Leicester biologists established that the Japanese Knotweed in Britain was one the biggest females in the world-...

UCSF researchers identify new drug target for Kaposi's sarcoma

UCSF researchers have identified a new potential drug target for the herpes virus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma, re-opening the possibility of using the class of drugs called protease inhibitors against the full herpes family of viruses, which for 20 years has been deemed too difficult to attain. ...

A crystal ball for brain cancer?

UCLA researchers have uncovered a new way to scan brain tumors and predict which ones will be shrunk by the drug Avastin -- before the patient ever starts treatment. By linking high water movement in tumors to positive drug response, the UCLA team predicted with 70 percent accuracy which patients...

Jet-propelled imaging for an ultrafast light source

John Spence, a physicist at Arizona State University, is a longtime user of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he has contributed to major advances in lensless imaging. It's a particularly apt propensity for someone who works with x-rays, since they can't be ...

Fujitsu Expands Support for Ethernet Networks With New Additions to XG Switch Product Line

SUNNYVALE, Calif., July 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Fujitsu Computer Products of America, Inc., a leading supplier of innovative computer products including hard disk drives, peripherals and biometric security solutions, today launched a new aggregated series of 24-port and 48-port 1Gb/10Gb Ether...

Test helps in fight against lung infections and for treating other life-threatening infections

Edmonton, Alberta A new test developed by Edmonton-based Innovotech™ Inc. will now allow doctors to more accurately identify the right antibiotics required to treat serious, chronic infections that are biofilm based. With more than 80 per cent of infections in the developed world caused by...

Study shows cancer vaccines led to long-term survival for patients with metastatic melanoma

Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian today announced promising data from a clinical study showing patient-specific cancer vaccines derived from patients' own cancer cells and immune cells were well tolerated and resulted in impressive long-term survival rates in patients with metastatic melanoma wh...

Researchers team up to provide new hope for childhood hunger

ST. LOUIS, MO, July 28, 2009 A St. Louis-based team of plant and physician-scientists with a vision of eradicating malnutrition throughout the developing world today announced the formation of the Global Harvest Alliance (GHA), a humanitarian effort involving St. Louis Children's Hospital, The Don...

UBC researchers help push for standard DNA barcodes for plants

Two University of British Columbia researchers are part of an international team recommending standards for the DNA barcoding of land plants, a step they hope will lead to a universal system for identifying over 400,000 species, and ultimately boost conservation efforts. Barcodes based on porti...

Warmer environment means shorter lives for cold-blooded animals

Stony Brook, N.Y., July 27, 2009 - Temperature explains much of why cold-blooded organisms such as fish, amphibians, crustaceans, and lizards live longer at higher latitudes than at lower latitudes, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ...

All-in-1 nanoparticle: A Swiss Army knife for nanomedicine

Nanoparticles are being developed to perform a wide range of medical uses imaging tumors, carrying drugs, delivering pulses of heat. Rather than settling for just one of these, researchers at the University of Washington have combined two nanoparticles in one tiny package. The result is the fi...

Nanodiamonds deliver insulin for wound healing

Bacterial infection is a major health threat to patients with severe burns and other kinds of serious wounds such as traumatic bone fractures. Recent studies have identified an important new weapon for fighting infection and healing wounds: insulin. Now, using tiny nanodiamonds, researchers at ...

Study reveals a reprogrammed role for the androgen receptor

BOSTONThe androgen receptor a protein ignition switch for prostate cancer cell growth and division is a master of adaptability. When drug therapy deprives the receptor of androgen hormones, thereby halting cell proliferation, the receptor manages to find an alternate growth route. A new study by...

ISU researchers find possible treatment for spinal muscular atrophy

AMES, Iowa - Spinal Muscular Atrophy is the second-leading cause of infant mortality in the world. Ravindra Singh, associate professor in biomedical sciences at Iowa State University's College of Veterinary Medicine, would like to see Spinal Muscular Atrophy lose its high ranking and even slide ...

DOE-funded research projects win 46 R&D 100 Awards for 2009

WASHINGTON, DC U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced today that Energy Department-funded researchers have won 46 of the 100 awards given out this year by R&D Magazine for the most outstanding technology developments with promising commercial potential. The coveted awards are presented an...

EPA grant to University of Chicago for research on food allergy triggers

WASHINGTON The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded a $433,100 grant to the University of Chicago to investigate how allergic reactions to food are initiated. The research is expected to lead to improved methods to assess whether pesticides produced in genetically engineered plants ca...

Scientists discover gene mutation responsible for hereditary neuroendocrine tumor

SALT LAKE CITY University of Utah researchers and their colleagues have identified the gene that is mutated in a hereditary form of a rare neuroendocrine tumor called paraganglioma (PGL). The gene, called hSDH5, is required for activation of an enzyme complex that plays a critical role in the che...

High construction cost for cycads

Thomas Marler recently published the results of his research that reveal some of the attributes of the long-lived leaves of Guam's Cycas micronesica plants. "These leaves are relatively large and are constructed of tough tissues," said Marler. "Both of these factors indicate the construction cos...

Frost & Sullivan Recognizes MIRTEC With the 2009 Award for Automated Optical Inspection Product Innovation of the Year

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., July 22 /PRNewswire/ -- Based on its recent analysis of the automated optical inspection (AOI) equipment market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes MIRTEC with the 2009 Global Frost & Sullivan Award for Product Innovation of the Year for its innovative MV-7xi...

Biodiesel on the wing: A 'green' process for biodiesel from feather meal

Scientists in Nevada are reporting development of a new and environmentally friendly process for producing biodiesel fuel from "chicken feather meal," made from the 11 billion pounds of poultry industry waste that accumulate annually in the United States alone. Their study is scheduled for the Jul...

LSUHSC shows for first time infant inhalation of ultrafine air pollution linked to adult lung disease

New Orleans, LA Stephania Cormier, PhD, Associate Professor of Pharmacology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, has shown for the first time that early exposure to environmentally persistent free radicals (present in airborne ultrafine particulate matter) affects long-term lung function. S...

Bad mitochondria may actually be good for you

Mice with a defective mitochondrial protein called MCLK1 produce elevated amounts of reactive oxygen when young; that should spell disaster, yet according to a study in this week's JBC these mice actually age at a slower rate and live longer than normal mice. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a...

A genetic basis for schizophrenia

Chicago, Illinois, July 21, 2009 Schizophrenia is a severely debilitating psychiatric disease that is thought to have its roots in the development of the nervous system; however, major breakthroughs linking its genetics to diagnosis, prognosis and treatment are still unrealized. Jill Morris, PhD ...

Iowa State University researchers develop process for 'surgical' genetic changes

AMES, Iowa - Research led by scientists at Iowa State University's Plant Sciences Institute has resulted in a process that will make genetic changes in plant genes much more efficient, practical and safe. The breakthrough was developed by David Wright, an associate scientist, and Jeffery Townsen...

Stuff of stink bombs investigated for role in pregnancy

Scientists at the University of Leicester are investigating how the stuff of stink bombs and flatulence could play a critical role in the human reproductive system. Hydrogen sulphide partially responsible for the foul odour of stink bombs- is also a toxic gas and has been used for chemical warf...

University of Miami receives stimulus funds for study of hurricane impacts on structures, ecosystems

MIAMI Hurricanes are the costliest natural disasters that strike the United States. A better understanding of how structures withstand -- or fail to withstand a hurricane could lead to improved construction standards and practices designed to protect human lives and enhance resiliency. The N...

UCLA researchers discover new molecular pathway for targeting cancer, disease

A UCLA study has identified a way to turn off a key signaling pathway involved in physiological processes that can also stimulate the development of cancer and other diseases. The findings may lead to new treatments and targeted drugs using this approach. In the study, which is currently ava...

The right messenger for a healthy immune response

Researchers from the Molecular Immunology group at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig, Germany have now shown that Beta-Interferon also plays a crucial role during an immune response: without Beta-Interferon immune cells are unable to show "wanted posters" of pathoge...

Promising new treatment for Alzheimer's suggested based on Hebrew University research

Research carried out at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has resulted in a promising approach to help treat Alzheimer's disease in a significant proportion of the population that suffers from a particularly rapid development of this disease. In the research at the Silberman Institute of Life...

Healing power of aloe vera proves beneficial for teeth and gums, too

CHICAGO (July 17, 2009) - The aloe vera plant has a long history of healing power. Its ability to heal burns and cuts and soothe pain has been documented as far back as the 10th century. Legend has it that Cleopatra used aloe vera to keep her skin soft. The modern use of aloe vera was first recogn...
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