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New cancer drug delivery system is effective and reversible

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. For cancer drug developers, finding an agent that kills tumor cells is only part of the equation. The drug must also spare healthy cells, and ideally its effects will be reversible, to cut short any potentially dangerous side effects. University of Illinois researchers report...

Wastewater produces electricity and desalinates water

A process that cleans wastewater and generates electricity can also remove 90 percent of salt from brackish water or seawater, according to an international team of researchers from China and the U.S. Clean water for drinking, washing and industrial uses is a scarce resource in some parts of th...

Protein handlers should be effective treatment target for cancer and Alzheimer's

AUGUSTA, Ga. Cancer and Alzheimer's have excess protein in common and scientists say learning more about how proteins are made and eliminated will lead to better treatment for both. Medical College of Georgia researchers Drs. Nahid F. Mivechi and Dimitrios Moskofidis have received two National...

Climate-caused biodiversity booms and busts in ancient plants and mammals

ANN ARBOR, Mich.---A period of global warming from 53 million to 47 million years ago strongly influenced plants and animals, spurring a biodiversity boom in western North America, researchers from three research museums report in a paper published online this week in the Proceedings of the Natio...

Argonne to showcase science and technology at community open house

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory will open its gates to the community on Saturday, August 29, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for a day of discovery and fun for the whole family. The event is free and open to the public. "The open house will be great fun for everyon...

New DNA and RNA aptamers offer unique therapeutic advantages

New Rochelle, NY, August 5, 2009A novel class of drugs composed of single strands of DNA or RNA, called aptamers, can bind protein targets with a high strength and specificity and are currently in clinical development as treatments for a broad range of common diseases, as described in a comprehens...

Beautiful plumage: Feather color and sex start the species revolution

Faculty of 1000, the leading scientific evaluation service, has highlighted research providing evidence for the evolution of a new species. Birds use plumage colour to recognize and select potential mates. A mutation of a single DNA base can lead to a striking colour change, as demonstrated by ...

New insights into health and environmental effects of carbon nanoparticles

A new study raises the possibility that flies and other insects that encounter nanomaterial "hot spots," or spills, near manufacturing facilities in the future could pick up and transport nanoparticles on their bodies, transferring the particles to other flies or habitats in the environment. The s...

Plankton Power and RTDC announce proposed algae-to-biofuels pilot facility on Cape Cod

Wellfleet, Mass. and Woods Hole, Mass., August 4, 2009 Plankton Power and the Regional Technology Development Corp. (RTDC) of Cape Cod announced today the establishment of a public-private consortium focused on building a leading-edge facility to produce renewable biofuels from algae. Under the le...

Animal and plant communication at the ESA Annual Meeting

Animals and plants communicate with one another in a variety of ways: behavior, body patterns, and even chemistry. In a series of talks at the Ecological Society of America's annual meeting, to be held August 3-7 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, ecologists explore the myriad adaptations for exchanging ...

Race/ethnicity, family income and education associated with sugar consumption

St. Louis, MO, August 1, 2009 The intake of added sugars in the United States is excessive, estimated by the US Department of Agriculture in 1999-2002 as 17% of calories a day. Consuming foods with added sugars displaces nutrient-dense foods in the diet. Reducing or limiting intake of added sugar...

ADA releases position paper on food and water safety

CHICAGO The American Dietetic Association has released an updated position paper on food and water safety that reviews the current situation in this country, identifies new tools that can help decrease illness and encourages continued research, education and technological advances to keep the foo...

August 2009 Geology and GSA Today media highlights

Boulder, CO, USA - GEOLOGY studies include some curious associations: air hockey and plate tectonics; calcite and Earth's orbit; Columbia River Flood Basalts and the Congo Fan; and rock hyrax middens and global climate change. Also in Geology: briny eruptions on Mars; the only basin known to have ...

National assessment done on potential invasive snail and slug pests in US

A collaborative team led by a University of Hawai'i at Manoa researcher has published the first-ever assessment of snail and slug species that are of potential threat to the nation's agriculture industry and the environment, should they ever be introduced in the U.S. The July 2009 article in th...

Rodent size linked to human population and climate change

You probably hadn't noticed -- but the head shape and overall size of rodents has been changing over the past century. A University of Illinois at Chicago ecologist has tied these changes to human population density and climate change. The finding is reported by Oliver Pergams, UIC research ass...

'Shifting Sands' highlights past, present and future of Maryland coastal bays ecosystem

Cambridge, Md. (July 30, 2009) A team of 80 researchers from more than 20 organizations has teamed up to author Shifting Sands: Environmental and Cultural Change in Maryland's Coastal Bays, a comprehensive look at the coastal lagoons and barrier islands making up Maryland's Atlantic coastline. ...

Naming evolution's winners and losers

Mammals and many species of birds and fish are among evolution's "winners," while crocodiles, alligators and a reptile cousin of snakes known as the tuatara are among the losers, according to new research by UCLA scientists and colleagues. "Our results indicate that mammals are special," sa...

Test helps in fight against lung infections and for treating other life-threatening infections

Edmonton, Alberta A new test developed by Edmonton-based Innovotech™ Inc. will now allow doctors to more accurately identify the right antibiotics required to treat serious, chronic infections that are biofilm based. With more than 80 per cent of infections in the developed world caused by...

Microbes and their hosts -- exploring the complexity of symbiosis in DNA and cell biology

New Rochelle, NY, July 28, 2009The unique association between microorganisms and their hosts, whether insects, plants, or mammals, provides a fascinating view into how microbial symbionts adapt to changing biological environments. Insights into the diversity and complexity of symbiotic relationshi...

Bioterrorism and disaster preparedness explored in special issue of Medical Decision Making

Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC (July 27, 2009) According to a study in a special issue of Medical Decision Making , a large-scale, covert anthrax attack on a large city would overwhelm hospital resources even with an extremely effective public health response, primari...

Cancer's distinctive pattern of gene expression could aid early screening and prevention

AUGUSTA, Ga. Distinctive patterns of genes turned off or left on in healthy versus cancerous cells could enable early screening for many common cancers and maybe help avoid them, Medical College of Georgia scientists say. Researchers are comparing chemical alterations, called DNA methylatio...

Common allergy drug reduces obesity and diabetes in mice

BOSTON, Mass. (July 26, 2009) Crack open the latest medical textbook to the chapter on type 2, or adult-onset, diabetes, and you'll be hard pressed to find the term "immunology" anywhere. This is because metabolic conditions and immunologic conditions are, with a few exceptions, distant cousins. ...

Early detection and quick response are key to defense against anthrax attack

NEW YORK (July 24, 2009) -- A large attack on a major metropolitan area with airborne anthrax could affect more than a million people, necessitating their treatment with powerful antibiotics. A new study finds that in order for a response to be effective, quick detection and treatment are essentia...

Airway cells use 'tasting' mechanism to detect and clear harmful substances

The same mechanism that helps you detect bad-tasting and potentially poisonous foods may also play a role in protecting your airway from harmful substances, according to a study by scientists at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. The findings could help explai...

Salt marshes: A natural and unnatural history

Now championed as critical habitats for plants, animals, and people because of the environmental service and protection they provide, salt marshes were once considered unproductive wastelands, home solely to mosquitoes and toxic waste, and mistreated for centuries by the human population. Explorin...

Stop and smell the flowers -- the scent really can soothe stress

Feeling stressed? Then try savoring the scent of lemon, mango, lavender, or other fragrant plants. Scientists in Japan are reporting the first scientific evidence that inhaling certain fragrances alter gene activity and blood chemistry in ways that can reduce stress levels. Their study appears in ...

The value of variation: Ecologists consider the causes and consequences

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Consider the case of the three-spine stickleback. These tiny fish that thrive in oceans and in fresh water might appear to be the same, yet ecologists are finding that they are actually a diverse collection of very specialized individuals. Understanding the ecological causes ...

PRS And EmSense Partner To Integrate Bio-Sensory Measures In Packaging Research Studies

CHICAGO, July 21 /PRNewswire/ -- Last week at the IIR Shopper Insights Conference, Perception Research Services International (PRS) and EmSense Corporation announced their partnership to include bio-sensory measures within quantitative packaging research studies. The companies pres...

Warming climate threatens California fruit and nut production

Winter chill, a vital climatic trigger for many tree crops, is likely to decrease by more than 50 percent during this century as global climate warms, making California no longer suitable for growing many fruit and nut crops, according to a team of researchers from the University of California, Da...

Researchers design first model motor nerve system that's insulated and organized like the human body

Amsterdam, 21 July 2009 - In the July issue of Biomaterials , published by Elsevier, researchers from the University of Central Florida (UCF) report on the first lab-grown motor nerves that are insulated and organized just like they are in the human body. The model system will drastically improv...

New research finds possible genetic link to cause of pregnancy loss and disorders

KNOXVILLE -- Scientists at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have published new findings about a cause of a condition at the root of genetic disorders such as Down Syndrome, pregnancy loss and infertility. Called aneuploidy, the condition i...

Overfishing and evolution

Using snorkelers and SCUBA divers is not the best way to monitor fish populations, if we want to know the evolutionary effects of overfishing. The fish population in coral reef areas is often assessed by snorkelers or SCUBA divers, but new research shows that these methods may misrepresent the ...

Healing power of aloe vera proves beneficial for teeth and gums, too

CHICAGO (July 17, 2009) - The aloe vera plant has a long history of healing power. Its ability to heal burns and cuts and soothe pain has been documented as far back as the 10th century. Legend has it that Cleopatra used aloe vera to keep her skin soft. The modern use of aloe vera was first recogn...

Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology increases impact, international reach

FAIRFAX, Va.The Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology 's quality and influence has remained consistently high over the past five years, and the increase in its impact factor to 2.217 in 2008 ranks JVIR in the top half of 90 radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging journals, acco...

$29.4 million grant establishes CTSI at NYU in partnership with Health and Hospitals Corporation

New York, NY July 14, 2009 NYU and NYU School of Medicine received a $29.4 million, five-year Clinical and Translational Science Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to establish a University-wide Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI) in partnership with the New York Ci...

A 'heart healthy' diet and ongoing, moderate physical activity may protect against cognitive decline

Vienna, July 14, 2009 Eating a "heart healthy" diet and maintaining or increasing participation in moderate physical activity may help preserve our memory and thinking abilities as we age, according to new research reported today at the Alzheimer's Association 2009 International Conference on Alz...

Hush little baby... Linking genes, brain and behavior in children

It comes as no surprise that some babies are more difficult to soothe than others but frustrated parents may be relieved to know that this is not necessarily an indication of their parenting skills. According to a new report in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychologica...

Results from trials of DHA in Alzheimer's disease and age-related cognitive decline

Vienna, July 12, 2009 Results from two large studies using DHA, an omega 3 fatty acid, were reported today at the Alzheimer's Association 2009 International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease (ICAD 2009) in Vienna. One of the trials was conducted by the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (A...

Innerscope Research Adds to Its Advisory Board Two Pioneers in the Measurement and Application of Emotional Engagement

MIT professor Sandy Pentland, former Advertising Research Foundation Chief Research Officer Dr. Joseph Plummer Provide Key Insights BOSTON, June 23 /PRNewswire/ -- Innerscope Research (R), a revolutionary biometric media research firm, announced today that it has added two new members to...

Growing Demand for Rapid Screening and Detection Systems Pushes the European Maritime Security Market, Finds Frost & Sullivan

LONDON, July 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Delays in cargo screening significantly extend the time of goods at port. This process could be shortened with foolproof and rapid screening and detection systems. At the same time, increased illegal immigration and smuggling augment the need for efficient access con...
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