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Chromosomal problems affect nearly all human embryos

Amsterdam, The Netherlands: For the first time, scientists have shown that chromosomal abnormalities are present in more than 90% of IVF embryos, even those produced by young, fertile couples. Ms Evelyne Vanneste, a PhD student in the Centre for Human Genetics and the University Fertility Center, ...

Rotator cuff tears: Are they all in the family?

ROSEMONT, ILPeople with relatives who have experienced rotator cuff tears are at increased risk of similar tendon tears themselves, according to a study published in the May 2009 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery ( JBJS ). "This strongly suggests genetic predisposition as a possible...

Our brains make their own marijuana: We're all pot heads deep inside

U.S. and Brazilian scientists have just proven that one of Bob Dylan's most famous lines"everybody must get stoned" is correct. That's because they've discovered that the brain manufactures proteins that act like marijuana at specific receptors in the brain itself. This discovery, published online...

Tentacles of venom: New study reveals all octopuses are venomous

Once thought to be only the realm of the blue-ringed octopus, researchers have now shown that all octopuses and cuttlefish, and some squid are venomous. The work indicates that they all share a common, ancient venomous ancestor and highlights new avenues for drug discovery. Conducted by scienti...

The host makes all the difference

"Where there are many scientific works dealing solely with the flu virus, we have investigated how the host reacts to an infection," says Klaus Schughart, head of the Experimental Mouse Genetics research group. In infection experiments the researchers have now discovered that an excessive immune ...

Time (and PPAR-beta/delta) heals all wounds

Mammalian skin requires constant maintenance, but how do skin cells know when to proliferate and at what rate? In the March 23, 2009 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology , Nguan Soon Tan and colleagues reveal that skin fibroblasts use a protein called PPARβ/δ to make sure overlying epit...

UK researcher identifies just 8 patterns as the cause of all humor

Evolutionary theorist Alastair Clarke has today published details of eight patterns he claims to be the basis of all the humour that has ever been imagined or expressed, regardless of civilization, culture or personal taste. Clarke has stated before that humour is based on the surprise recogni...

Synthesizing the most natural of all skin creams

Even after nine months soaking in the womb, a newborn's skin is smooth unlike an adult's in the bath. While occupying a watery, warm environment, the newborn manages to develop a skin fully equipped to protect it in a cold, dry and bacteria-infected world. A protective cream called Vernix caseosa...

Wonderful cheese is all in the culture

It's an age-old tradition that dates back at least 8,000 years but it seems we still have much to learn about the bacteria responsible for turning milk into cheese. Now an international research team led by Newcastle University has identified a new line of bacteria they believe add flavour to som...

Codeine not safe for all breastfeeding moms and their babies

Using pain treatments which contain codeine may be risky for some breastfeeding mothers, according to researchers at The University of Western Ontario, and the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto. Lead author Dr. Gideon Koren published research in the journal, Clinical Pharmacology &...

New bee checklist lets scientists link important information about all bee species

In time for National Pollinator Week, June 22 through June 28, biologists have completed an online effort to compile a world checklist of bees. They have identified nearly 19,500 bee species worldwide, about 2,000 more than previously estimated. There is a current crisis known as "colony collapse ...

Tests show LLNL detection instrument can monitor the air for all major terrorist threat substances

Security and law enforcement officials may some day have a new ally - a universal detection system that can monitor the air for virtually all of the major threat agents that could be used by terrorists. This type of system is under development by a team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory...

New technique determines the number of fat cells remains constant in all body types

LIVERMORE, Calif. - The radioactive carbon-14 produced by above-ground nuclear testing in the 1950s and '60s has helped researchers determine that the number of fat cells in a human's body, whether lean or obese, is established during the teenage years. Changes in fat mass in adulthood can be attr...

Looking at neurons from all sides

HOUSTON (April 28, 2008) A new technique that marries a fast-moving laser beam with a special microscope that look at tissues in different optical planes will enable scientists to get a three-dimensional view of neurons or nerve cells as they interact, said Baylor College of Medicine scientists ...

Biogas production is all in the mixing

Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis, using an impressive array of imaging and tracking technologies, have determined the importance of mixing in anaerobic digesters, reactors that use bacteria to breakdown organic matter in the absence of oxygen. They are studying ways to take the s...

People with diabetes may have all natural citrus supplement

SAN DIEGO, CA., April 9. . . Two new studies presented at the Experimental Biology Annual Meeting suggest that an all-natural dietary supplement made from citrus may help people with type 2 diabetes lower their blood glucose numbers after a meal and their LDL-cholesterol levels. Mal Evans, DV...

First map of threats to marine ecosystems shows all the world's oceans are affected

CHAPEL HILL As vast and far-reaching as the worlds oceans are, every square kilometer is affected by human activities, according to a study in the journal Science by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and others. The international team of scientists integrated globa...

Eat up all of your Brussels sprouts -- unless you're an aphid

Aphids that eat Brussels sprouts are smaller than normal and live in undersized populations, which has a negative knock-on effect up the food chain according to new research published today (8 February) in Science. The study shows for the first time that the nutritional quality of plant food so...

It's all about geometry: Protein contact surfaces hold key to cures

Your mother always told you to do your geometry homework, and for scientists seeking new treatments for diseases like Parkinsons and Alzheimers, this advice turns out to be right on the mark. In the atomic-level landscape of proteins, shape determines the all-important function of these molecul...

Professor's video series explains all facets of Earth

Videos have been the bailiwick of rock stars at least since the days of Bob Dylan. But now theyre spilling over into a new arena - academia. Michael E. Wysession, Ph.D., associate professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, has 48 ...

Cornell patents a pink lily look-alike that blooms all summer long

Mauve Majesty is one cool lily look-alike. This new pinkish-purple ornamental flower, just patented by Cornell, can last for two weeks in a vase, but when left in the garden, it blooms all summer long in the cooler, northern states until the first hard freeze in the fall. The new hybrid of the In...

Where have all the lake eels gone? Queen's prof asks

KINGSTON, Ont. A Queens University environmental scientist will head a new international study to determine whether American eels the slimy, snake-like fish considered worldwide to be a food delicacy are dying from chemical pollution in Lake Ontario. Biology professor Peter Hodson and his te...

ANDRILL's 2nd Antarctic drilling season exceeds all expectations

McMurdo Station, Antarctica, Nov. 28, 2007 -- A second season in Antarctica for the Antarctic Geological Drilling (ANDRILL) Program has exceeded all expectations, according to the co-chief scientists of the program's Southern McMurdo Sound Project. One week ago (Nov. 21), the drilling team passed...

A wheat for all seasons -- and reasons

BUSHLAND The seeds may be lacking for perennial wheat to be grown on any significant basis in Texas, but interest is not, according to Dr. Charlie Rush, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station plant pathologist. From wheat producers and cattle grazing operators to multiple state plant breeders, R...

Depression, aging, and proteins made by a virus may all play role in heart disease

COLUMBUS, Ohio Researchers here have linked an increase in two immune system proteins essential for inflammation to a latent viral infection and proposed a chain of events that might accelerate cardiovascular disease. The same process may be involved in a host of other ailments plaguing the e...

Right breakfast bread keeps blood sugar in check all day

If you eat the right grains for breakfast, such as whole-grain barley or rye, the regulation of your blood sugar is facilitated after breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It was previously not known that certain whole-grain products have this effect all day. This is due to a combination of low GI (glycem...

Minimum information standards -- all for 1 and 1 for all

Three papers published by EMBL scientists and their collaborators will make it much easier to share and compare information from large-scale proteomics data. The papers are published in Nature Biotechnology on 8th and 26th August. As the quantity of available biological information and the use...

A bad performance is better than no performance at all

The learning of birdsong resembles the learning of speech in humans. Crucial for the process are acoustic perception and the ability to produce sound. Social isolation leads to a disturbed vocal development both in humans and in birds. When children grow up without contact to other humans they ei...

One size does not fit all

Statins, a commonly prescribed class of drugs used by millions worldwide to effectively lower blood cholesterol levels, may actually have a negative impact in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients treated with high daily dosages. A new study by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI...

New book suggests Earth perhaps not such a benevolent mother after all

In the past 50 years it has become commonplace to think of Earth as a nurturing place, straining mightily to maintain equilibrium so that life might continue and flourish. The Gaia hypothesis, named for the ancient Greek goddess of Earth, even put forth the idea that our planet behaves as a ...

Scientific community called upon to resolve debate on 'net energy' once and for all

"Net energy is a (mostly) irrelevant, misleading and dangerous metric," says Professor Bruce Dale, editor-in-chief of Biofuels, Bioresources and Biorefining (Biofpr) in the latest issue of the journal published today. Net energy is a metric by which some scientists attempt to assess the sust...

Weight loss -- not one size fits all

There is no "one size fits all" when it comes to weight loss through exercise, says Queensland University of Technology behavioural scientist Neil King. Dr Neil King, from QUT's Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, is the lead author of a study conducted in collaboration with the Univ...

Research finds that circadian rhythms dominate all life functions

New research from Colorado State University shows that the function of all genes in mammals is based on circadian -- or daily -- rhythms. The study, publishing in PLoS Computational Biology on June 15, refutes the current theory that only 10 percent to 15 percent of all genes were affected by natu...

New biofuels process promises to meet all US transportation needs

Purdue University chemical engineers have proposed a new environmentally friendly process for producing liquid fuels from plant matter - or biomass - potentially available from agricultural and forest waste, providing all of the fuel needed for "the entire U.S. transportation sector." The new app...

'Ancestral eve' was mother of all tooth decay

A New York University College of Dentistry (NYUCD) research team has found the first oral bacterial evidence supporting the dispersal of modern Homo sapiens out of Africa to Asia. The team, led by Page Caufield, a professor of cariology and comprehensive care at NYUCD, discovered that Streptoc...

By 2048 all current fish, seafood species projected to collapse

Marine species loss is accelerating and threatening human well-being, according to a report published in the 3 November issue of the journal Science published by AAAS, the nonprofit science society. "Species have been disappearing from ocean ecosystems and this trend has recently been accelerat...

New study: Preterm birth causes one-third of all infant deaths

Premature birth was the underlying cause of nearly twice as many infant deaths than previously estimated, according to a new analysis by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The analysis, published today in Pediatrics, found that in 2002 preterm birth, birth at less...

Why don't all moles progress to melanoma?

Everyone has moles. Most of the time, they are nothing but a cosmetic nuisance. But sometimes pigment-producing cells in moles called melanocytes start dividing abnormally to form a deadly form of skin cancer called melanoma. About one in 65 Americans born this year will be diagnosed with melanoma...

Memories: It's all in the packaging, scientists say

Researchers at UC Irvine have found that how much detail one remembers of an event depends on whether a certain portion of the brain is activated to "package" the memory. The research may help to explain why sometimes people only recall parts of an experience such as a car accident, and yet vivid...

Why we could all do with a siesta

The Spaniards may have been right all along ?a siesta after a hearty lunch is natural, new research suggests. Scientists at The University of Manchester have for the first time uncovered how brain cells or 'neurons' that keep us alert become turned off after we eat. The findings ?published in ...
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