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New Report Just Published: World Solid-State, Fiber, Gas and Dye Lasers Market Report

NEW YORK, July 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com just added a new market research report to its catalogue. World Solid-State, Fiber, Gas and Dye Lasers Market http://www.reportlinker.com/p0119491/World-Solid-State-FiberGas-and-Dye-Lasers-Market.html?utm_source=PRNWire&utm_me...

Scientists find a biological 'fountain of youth' in new world bat caves

Scientists from Texas are batty over a new discovery which could lead to the single most important medical breakthrough in human historysignificantly longer lifespans. The discovery, featured on the cover of the July 2009 print issue of The FASEB Journal ( http://www.fasebj.org ), shows that pro...

Canadian-based UN coral reef expert honored at world meeting in Australia

World experts meeting in Australia have presented a Canadian-based UN coral reef specialist with a distinguished award for his lifetime of achievement in marine research. Peter Sale, Assistant Director for Coastal Zones at the United Nations University's International Network on Water, Environm...

Scientists urge world leaders to respond cooperatively to Pacific Ocean threats

More than 400 leading scientists from nearly two-dozen countries have signed a consensus statement on the major threats facing the Pacific Ocean. The threats identified as the most serious and pervasive include overfishing, pollution, habitat destruction and climate change. "This is...

Indigenous peoples at world summit to share climate change observations, coping techniques

With the first climate change-related relocation of an Inuit village already underway, some 400 Indigenous People and observers from 80 nations are convening in Alaska for a UN-affiliated conference April 20-24 to discuss ways in which traditional knowledge can be used to both mitigate and adapt t...

Sensoring the World Wide Web

CSIRO scientists will lead an international initiative to develop standards for sharing information collected by sensors and sensor networks over the Internet. Dr Kerry Taylor and Amit Parashar of CSIRO's ICT Centre are to co-chair the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Semantic Sensor Network ...

MIT: How you feel the world impacts how you see it

In the classic waterfall illusion, if you stare at the downward motion of a waterfall for some period of time, stationary objects like rocks appear to drift upward. MIT neuroscientists have found that this phenomenon, called motion aftereffect, occurs not only in our visual perception but also i...

CHIs 5th Biomarker World Congress: Signature Event with Cutting-Edge Agenda

Needham, MA, March 26, 2009 / b3c newswire / - Cambridge Healthtech Institute’s Fifth Annual Biomarker World Congress will be held May 27-29, 2009 at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The advance registration deadline for this event is April 10, 2009. The signature e...

Teeth of Columbus' crew flesh out tale of new world discovery

MADISON The adage that dead men tell no tales has long been disproved by archaeology. Now, however, science is taking interrogation of the dead to new heights. In a study that promises fresh and perhaps personal insight into the earliest European visitors to the New World, a team or researche...

New simulation shows consequences of a world without Earth's natural sunscreen

The year is 2065. Nearly two-thirds of Earth's ozone is gone -- not just over the poles, but everywhere. The infamous ozone hole over Antarctica, first discovered in the 1980s, is a year-round fixture, with a twin over the North Pole. The ultraviolet (UV) radiation falling on mid-latitude cities l...

Mobile Communication Market Opens up for Biometrics - Precise Biometrics Awarded 1st Prize at GSMA World Mobile Congress

LUND, Sweden, February 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Precise Biometrics came in first place in the global SIMagine competition, held annually at the GSMA World Mobile Congress - the world's largest event for mobile communication. The awarded mobile aviation solution is based on Precise Match-on-SIM(TM) a...

HWI scientist first in world to unravel structure of key breast cancer target enzyme

The molecular details of Aromatase, the key enzyme required for the body to make estrogen, are no longer a mystery thanks to the structural biology work done by the Ghosh lab at the Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute (HWI) in Buffalo, New York. Dr. Debashis Ghosh's solution of the three...

New World post-pandemic reforestation helped start Little Ice Age, say Stanford scientists

The power of viruses is well documented in human history. Swarms of little viral Davids have repeatedly laid low the great Goliaths of human civilization, most famously in the devastating pandemics that swept the New World during European conquest and settlement. In recent years, there has been...

100-meter sprint world record could go as low as 9.48 seconds

2008 was a great summer for sports' fans. World records tumbled at the Beijing Olympics. Usain Bolt shattered both the 100m and 200m world records, knocking tenths of a second off each. People have been getting faster and faster over the last few decades, which made marathon runner Mark Denny, fro...

Marine invasive species advance 50 km per decade, World Conference on Marine Biodiversity told

A rapid, climate change-induced northern migration of invasive marine is one of many research results announced Tues. Nov. 11 during opening day presentations at the First World Conference on Marine Biodiversity, Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias, in Valencia. Investigators report that invasiv...

Marine invasive species advance 50km per decade, World Conference on Marine Biodiversity told

A rapid, climate change-induced northern migration of invasive marine is one of many research results announced Tues. Nov. 11 during opening day presentations at the First World Conference on Marine Biodiversity, Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias, in Valencia. Investigators report that invasiv...

EPA teams with National Geographic Society and World Resources Institute to map ecosystem services

(Washington, DC October 29, 2008) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is collaborating with the National Geographic Society and the World Resources Institute to develop tools that will help to fully account for the value of ecosystem services. Ecosystem services are the goods and se...

Nutrition and bone health session to open the IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis in Bangkok

The IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis, the largest scientific conference devoted primarily to osteoporosis, will open on December 3rd in Bangkok with a special session focused on four key topics in nutrition and bone health. Professor Cyrus Cooper, Director of the MRC Epidemiology Resource Ce...

Providing toilets, safe water is top route to reducing world poverty: UN University

Simply installing toilets where needed throughout the world and ensuring safe water supplies would do more to end crippling poverty and improve world health than any other possible measure, according to an analysis released today by the United Nations University. The analysis says better water ...

Take advantage of reduced pre-registration rates for the IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis

Convenient online registration to the IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis 2008, at greatly discounted rates, is available only until October 31, 2008. To benefit from lower rates and easy registration, please visit http://www.iofbonehealth.org/wco/2008/homepage.html . Special registration fee...

Europe rallies behind nanotechnology to wean world from fossil fuels

Nanotechnologies can be used to develop sustainable energy systems while reducing the harmful effects of fossil fuels as they are gradually phased out over the next century. This optimistic scenario is coming closer to reality as new technologies such as biomimetics and Dye Sensitized solar Cells ...

Nanotechnology: A brave new world requires bold new research approaches

(Washington, D.C. - Sept. 18, 2008) Nanotechnology opens new worlds of possibilities for important computer, medical and environmental applications. To ensure nanotechnology is developed in a responsible manner, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and EPA awarded $38 million to establish two Cen...

Warming world in range of dangerous consequences

The earth will warm about 2.4 C (4.3 F) above pre-industrial levels even under extremely conservative greenhouse-gas emission scenarios and under the assumption that efforts to clean up particulate pollution continue to be successful, according to a new analysis by a pair of researchers at Scripps...

IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis in Bangkok to address Asian issues

With projections indicating that more than 50% of all osteoporotic hip fractures will occur in Asia by the year 2050, the prevention and treatment of osteoporotic fractures has become a major health concern in the region. The IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis (IOF WCO), to be held for the firs...

TORC at UH turns to virtual world of Second Life for new study

The University of Houston department of health and human performance is launching an international effort to recruit 500 participants for a study promoting healthy dietary habits and physical activity. The study will take place entirely in the virtual world of Second Life (SL). ...

Human embryonic stem cells developed from 4-cell embryo; world first may lessen ethical concerns

This release is available in Spanish . Barcelona, Spain: For the first time in the world scientists have succeeded in developing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) from a single cell, or blastomere, of a 4-cell stage embryo, the 24th annual conference of the European Society of Human Reprod...

Researchers reveal insights into hidden world of protein folding

The proteins upon which life depends share an attribute with paper airplanes: Unless folded properly, they just won't fly. But researchers have been puzzled by how the long, linear proteins cranked out by the ribosome factories in a cell are folded into the shapes they must assume to perform th...

The sweet world of soil microbiology

Using classroom, hands-on activities can help instructors to communicate difficult scientific concepts and stimulate student thinking. Despite its importance, the diversity in soil microbes can conceptually be difficult to teach, especially in natural resource classrooms composed primarily of unde...

Scientists aim to boost world energy supplies -- with microbes!

British and Canadian scientists expect to begin trials next month (May) to find out whether microbes can unlock the vast amount of energy trapped in the world's unrecoverable heavy oil deposits. An estimated six trillion barrels of oil remain underground because the oil has become either solid o...

PNNL reaches goal to change world one light at a time

RICHLAND, Wash. How many employees does it take to change an incandescent light bulb to a more environmentally friendly one" When it comes to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, that figure is approximately 1,000. Thats the number of staff members who recently committed to participate in the n...

Food biotechnology: real world challenges

Genetically modified crops have been widely adopted by American farmers. In spite of their use in the United States, the European Union (EU) imposed a 6-year freeze (19982004) on growing and importing transgenic crops. In 2002, transgenic food aid to African nations was rejected by the recipient...

5th Annual World Health Care Congress April 21-23, Washington, D.C.

The World Health Care Congress is the premier forum for health care executives to explore a myriad of emerging issues and to network with key leaders. The 2008 Congress will include senior executives and government officials from the nation's largest employers, hospitals, health systems, health pl...

Seeking sustainability in a world of instability

FAIRBANKS, AlaskaFor most northern indigenous people, the roughly 3 million caribou in the world are their most important terrestrial subsistence resource, and while hunters and scientists alike have long expressed concern about the on-going availability of caribou, their perceptions of the causes...

Big Mac: The whole world on your plate

A burger and fries may be the quintessential North American meal but it can also be viewed as the perfect example of humanitys increasingly varied diet, according to researchers who have conducted a unique study of the plants used around the world for food. In the first-ever study of the phylog...

Toll of climate change on world food supply could be worse than thought

Global agriculture, already predicted to be stressed by climate change in coming decades, could go into steep, unanticipated declines in some regions due to complications that scientists have so far inadequately considered, say three new scientific reports. The authors say that progressive changes...

Acoustics World Wide press room now open

November 21, 2007 -- Reporters interested in the upcoming Acoustical Society of America (ASA) meeting in New Orleans are invited to visit the associated World Wide pressroom even if they cannot attend in person. On this site are posted dozens of lay language papers selected from among the 600 talk...

Norman Borlaug, Rob Horsch to keynote world hunger lecture

Nobel Peace Prize recipient Norman Borlaug and Rob Horsch of the Gates Foundation will discuss the challenges of developing agricultural technologies to feed the world to kick off the International Annual Meetings of the American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), a...

New population of Iberian lynx raises hope, says World Wildlife Fund

Madrid, Spain - Spanish authorities have announced they have discovered a previously unknown population of Iberian lynx, triggering hope for one of the worlds most endangered cat species, said World Wildlife Fund today. We are excited and amazed by this discovery, said Luis Suarez, head of WWFs...

Shellfish face an uncertain future in a high CO2 world

Overfishing and disease have decimated shellfish populations in many of the world's temperate estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Smithsonian scientists, led by Whitman Miller, ecologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Md., have discovered another serious threat to the...

New research reveals the earliest evidence for corn in the New World

Among the hundreds of plants that have been domesticated in the New World, none has received as much attention or been subject to as much debate as corn, or maize (Zea mays L.), arguably the most important crop of the Americas. Controversies have existed for years over what the wild ancestor of ma...
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