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Women in Biological News

UTMB study identifies women at risk of gaining excessive weight with injectable birth control

GALVESTON, Texas Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have identified women who are likely to gain weight while using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, more commonly known as Depo-Provera or the birth control shot. These findings dispel the myth that all women who u...

Fruit and vegetable intake in pregnant women reduces risk of upper respiratory tract infection

(Boston) Boston University School of Medicine researchers (BUSM) have observed in a study of pregnant women that consumption of at least seven servings per day of fruits and vegetables moderately reduced the risk of developing an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). The BUSM study appears o...

Two dietary oils, two sets of benefits for older women with diabetes

COLUMBUS, Ohio A study comparing how two common dietary oil supplements affect body composition suggests that both oils, by themselves, can lower body fat in obese postmenopausal women with Type 2 diabetes. The two oils compared were safflower oil, a common cooking oil, and conjugated linoleic...

New, less invasive genetic test greatly improves pregnancy rates in older women with poor prognosis

Amsterdam, The Netherlands: A new test examining chromosomes in human eggs a few hours after fertilisation can identify those that are capable of forming a healthy baby, a researcher told the 25th annual conference of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology today (Monday 29 June)...

Debate on admin. of magnesium sulfate to pregnant women to prevent cerebral palsy in pre-term infants

New York, New York, June 29, 2009 Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most prevalent chronic childhood motor disability with an estimated lifetime cost of nearly $1 million per individual. There is evidence that magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) can reduce the incidence of CP for very early preterm infants. Many ...

Single women gaze longer

In the study, published in the March issue of Human Nature , women both with and without sexual partners showed little difference in their subjective ratings of photos of men when considering such measures as masculinity and attractiveness. However, the women who did not have sexual partners spe...

Study suggests obese women should not gain weight

For years, doctors and other health-care providers have managed pregnant patients according to guidelines issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). In 1986, ACOG stated, "Regardless of how much women weigh before they become pregnant, gaining between 26-35 pounds du...

Report updates guidelines on how much weight women should gain during pregnancy

WASHINGTON -- A growing amount of scientific evidence indicates that how much weight women gain during pregnancy and their starting weight at conception can affect their health and that of their babies, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council. The report...

Older men more likely than women to die after pneumonia

PITTSBURGH, April 29 Differing biological response to infection between men and women may explain higher death rates among older men who are hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The findings, published online in the Critical Care Medicine journal, may have important implication...

Immigrant women may be at higher risk of having a baby with a birth defect

TORONTO, Ont., April 16 2009 Immigrant women are less likely to use folic acid supplements before pregnancy to prevent spina bifida, particularly those who recently immigrated to the country, according to a new study led by a St. Michael's Hospital physician in collaboration with Statistics Canad...

Why do women store fat differently from men?

It's a paradox that has flummoxed women for generations their apparent ability to store fat more efficiently than men, despite eating proportionally fewer calories. While it has long been suspected that female sex hormones are responsible, a University of New South Wales (UNSW) research revie...

Hispanic women and breast cancer: An understudied group

This release is available in Spanish . CAREFREE, A.Z. - Data from the ELLA Binational Breast Cancer Study will be released for the first time at the American Association for Cancer Research Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Carefree, Arizona. "Hispanics are the ...

Researchers may have found why women have an edge on salt-sensitive hypertension

AUGUSTA, Ga. Researchers may have found why women have an edge in keeping a healthier balance between the amount of salt they eat and excrete - at least before reaching menopause. Premenopausal women are known to have fewer problems with salt-sensitive hypertension and hypertension in general,...

Springer author and advisory board member wins L'Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Award

Physicist Athene Donald is one of five women scientists who will receive the prestigious 2009 L'Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Award. She and the other recipients, each representing a different continent, will receive the awards on 5 March 2009 at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris. Each laureate wil...

Research finds older women who are more physically fit have better cognitive function

New research published in the international journal Neurobiology of Aging by Marc Poulin, PhD, DPhil, finds that being physically fit helps the brain function at the top of its game. An Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Senior Scholar, Poulin finds that physical activity benefits ...

Uncultured bacteria found in amniotic fluids of women who experience preterm births

CLEVELANDResearchers from Case Western Reserve University and Yale University have made a significant advancement in understanding the cause behind why some pregnant women suffer from inflammations in the inner womb without any signs of an infection. Using gene-cloning techniques, researchers d...

Long-term use of diabetes drugs by women significantly increases risk of fractures

A group of drugs commonly used to treat diabetes can double the risk of bone fractures in women, according to a new study by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Wake Forest University. Published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) , the findings show that use of thiazo...

Men are red, women are green, Brown researcher finds

Michael J. Tarr, a Brown University scientist, and graduate student Adrian Nestor have discovered this color difference in an analysis of dozens of faces. They determined that men tend to have more reddish skin and greenish skin is more common for women. The finding has important implications i...

Pregnant women with asthma can be more confident about some medicines

Budesonide sprays can be regarded as safe for pregnancy - other asthma drugs have not been as well studied though Women can usually keep using the same asthma drugs they were using before they got pregnant. Budesonide sprays are the best studied and can be regarded as safe. More trials of ot...

Pregnant women consuming flaxseed oil have high risk of premature birth

A study has found that the risks of a premature birth quadruple if flaxseed oil is consumed in the last two trimesters of pregnancy. The research was conducted by Professor Anick Brard of the Universit de Montral's Faculty of Pharmacy and the Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Center and Master's st...

Study: Elderly Women can increase strength but still risk falls

DURHAM, N.H. Elderly women can increase muscle strength as much as young women can, a new study from the University of New Hampshire finds, indicating that decline in muscle function is less a natural part of the aging process than due to a decline in physical activity. The research, publish...

Vitamin K does not stem BMD decline in postmenopausal women with osteopenia

In a randomized controlled trial called the "Evaluate the Clinical use of vitamin K Supplementation in Postmenopausal Women with Osteopenia" (ECKO) trial, Angela Cheung and colleagues at the University of Toronto found that a high dose daily vitamin K1 supplement did not protect against age-relate...

Brown University and Women & Infants Hospital expand national children's study to Bristol County

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] Brown University, with lead partner Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, has been awarded a $12-million, five-year contract to expand its participation in the National Children's Study, a groundbreaking research project aimed at improving child health. ...

Promising new treatment option for women with recurrent ovarian cancer

Combining the new drug trabectedin with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin provides clinical benefit to women with relapsed ovarian cancer, according to new results presented at the 33rd Congress of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) in Stockholm. The combination, which importantly ...

Cryopreservation techniques bring hopes for women cancer victims and endangered species

Emerging cryopreservation techniques are increasing hope of restoring fertility for women after diseases such as ovarian cancer that lead to destruction of reproductive tissue. The same techniques can also be used to maintain stocks of farm animals, and protect against extinction of endangered ani...

NYU receives $490k NSF grant to promote women in the sciences

New York University has received a $490,000, three-year grant from the National Science Foundation to bolster its existing campus-wide initiative to promote the representation of women and minorities in the sciences. It seeks to achieve these aims by providing support for female faculty at all lev...

Early cessation of breastfeeding by HIV+ women in poor countries and child survival

July 24, 2008 A new study by researchers from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health addresses one of the most challenging issues in infant health and preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission in poor countries. In these settings, HIV-infected mothers had been advised that for t...

Extreme nausea and vomiting varies among pregnant women from different countries

Mothers born in India and Sri Lanka are three times more likely to suffer from extreme nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (hyperemesis gravidarum) than ethnic Norwegians. This finding comes from the Norwegian Institute of Public Healths study of 900, 000 first-time pregnancies registered in the Medi...

Domestic violence associated with chronic malnutrition in women and children in India

Boston, MA-- In a new, large-scale study exploring the link between domestic violence and chronic malnutrition, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) have found that Indian mothers and children experiencing multiple incidents of domestic violence in the previous year are more...

Do attractive women want it all?

AUSTIN, TexasAlthough many researchers have believed women choose partners based on the kind of relationship they are seeking, a new study from The University of Texas at Austin reveals womens preferences can be influenced by their own attractiveness. David Buss, psychology researcher at the un...

New folic acid seal helps women choose enriched grain foods to help prevent birth defects

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., JAN. 9, 2008 Not enough American women understand that consuming the B vitamin folic acid every day can help prevent serious birth defects, and only 40 percent are taking daily multivitamin supplements containing this essential nutrient beginning before pregnancy, two recent s...

Gender roles and not gender bias hold back women scientists

Traditional roles of women in the home and a negative bias in workplace support result in less career success for women versus men at the same stage of their research careers, determined researchers at the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) in a study appearing in the November 2007 iss...

Too few women scientists achieving academic leadership positions

New Rochelle, November 16, 2007 As the U.S. continues to fall behind countries such as China and India in producing high-level scientists, one immediate and obvious solution would be to take advantage of the many women who have obtained doctoral degrees in science but have been passed over in the...

Cell response to stress signals predicts tumors in women with common pre-breast cancer

A specific biological response to cellular stress may predict the likelihood of future tumor formation of the most common, non-invasive form of pre-malignant breast cancer-- ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS. This information could potentially be used in a clinical setting to determine which ...

Pregnant women at risk for unnecessary operations due to misdiagnosis of appendicitis

CHICAGO (October 24, 2007) New research published in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons suggests that pregnant women suspected of having appendicitis are often misdiagnosed and undergo unnecessary appendectomies (removal of the appendix) that can result in early ...

Drug could improve pregnancy outcomes in wider range of women with insulin resistance

St. Louis, Sept. 6, 2007 Women who are obese, have type 2 diabetes or a family history of type 2 diabetes could one day have more successful pregnancies because of a study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. This study, performed in mice, suggests that Metformin, the mos...

Health benefits of physical activity more pronounced in women

Many experimental studies have found that physical exercise can improve cholesterol levels and subsequently decrease the risks of cardiovascular disease; however, few of these studies have included enough participant diversity to provide ethnic breakdowns. Now, a long-term study of over 8,700 midd...

Study explains potential failure of oral contraceptives with obese women

PORTLAND, Ore. Researchers have identified a potential biological mechanism that could explain why oral contraceptives may be less effective at preventing pregnancy in obese women, as some epidemiological studies have indicated. Although conventional oral contraceptives appear to eventually re...

New MRI technique could mean fewer breast biopsies in high-risk women

MADISON A University of Wisconsin-Madison biomedical engineer and colleagues have developed a method that, applied in MRI scans of the breast, could spare some women with increased breast cancer risk the pain and stress of having to endure a biopsy of a questionable lump or lesion. The univers...

Following the dietary guidelines may slow heart disease in women

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) provide guidance to promote health and reduce risk of chronic diseases. However, what evidence is there that following the DGA optimizes health? Is this advice useful for individuals already in poor health? To study these questions, researchers at the USD...
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