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'Honey bee health' of concern at Western Apicultural Society conference

Honey bee specialists and native pollinator experts will address the 31st annual Western Apicultural Society (WAS) Conference, set Aug. 17-20 in Healdsburg, Sonoma County. The main conference sessions will take place in the Dry Creek Inn and Krug Event Center, 198 Dry Creek Road. "The conf...

GSA special paper presents new studies of Western US earth motion

Boulder, CO, USA The Great BasinSierra Nevada transition zone has received substantial attention over the past decade, due in part to the recognition that nearly 25% of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates is accommodated along this tectonic boundary. This Geological ...

Case Western Reserve University engineers hit pay dirt with clay mixture

A watery, mud-like substance has hit pay dirt for Case Western Reserve University engineering professor David Schiraldi and his research group. The researchers have created a line of patented foam-like and environmentally friendly polymers, called clay aerogel composites that can take on the s...

Case Western Reserve University receives $1.66m grant from NIH for otoprotection research

CLEVELAND April 13, 2009 Qing Yin Zheng, M.D., assistant professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Genetics at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and member of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, has been awarded a five year $1.66 million grant from the Nationa...

Collaboration leads to success: Most powerful computer of its kind in western N.Y. available worldwide

BUFFALO, N.Y. Local scientist Dr. Russ Miller is leading the rollout of "Magic," one of the most powerful computers in New York State to qualified users worldwide for solving computationally-demanding problems. New Methods Allow Scholars to Address Previously Unsolvable Problems Cyberinf...

Case Western Reserve researchers develop 'wireless' activation of brain circuits

Traditionally, stimulating nerves or brain tissue involves cumbersome wiring and a sharp metal electrode. But a team of researchers at Case Western Reserve University is going "wireless." And it's a unique collaboration between chemists and neuroscientists that led to the discovery of a remarka...

Case Western Reserve researchers looking at light-induced toxins in air and water

Is the air we breathe on a daily basis slowly killing us? It may not be that severe, but the air we breathe and water we drink may be more harmful than we realize. Toxic nitro-aromatic pollutants (or nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), both manmade and naturally occurring, continue t...

Climate change's impact on invasive plants in Western US may create restoration opportunities

Princeton, NJ January 27, 2009 A new study by researchers at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs has found that global climate change may lead to the retreat of some invasive plant species in the western United States, which could create unprecedented...

Tree deaths have doubled across the western US

Tree death rates have more than doubled over the last few decades in old-growth forests of the western United States, and the most probable cause of the worrisome trend is regional warming, according to a U.S. Geological Survey-led (USGS) study published in Science on January 23. The study fo...

Case Western Reserve finds mechanism underlying alt. splicing of premessenger RNA into messenger RNA

CLEVELAND December 24, 2008 An international research team led by Tim Nilsen, Ph.D., a professor of medicine and biochemistry and the director of the School of Medicine's Center for RNA Molecular Biology, has discovered an unexpected mechanism governing alternative splicing, the process by which...

Case Western Reserve University uncovers genetic basis for some birth defects

CLEVELAND November 10, 2008 A multidisciplinary research team at Case Western Reserve University led by Gary Landreth, Ph.D., a professor in the School of Medicine's Department of Neurosciences, has uncovered a common genetic pathway for a number of birth defects that affect the development of th...

NSF grant to launch undergrads from Case Western Reserve into math and science teaching

CLEVELAND The National Science Foundation (NSF) is funding a new program at Case Western Reserve University to prepare 24 high-achieving science and math undergraduates for teaching careers. The newly funded Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program within the College of Arts and Sciences at C...

Case Western Reserve receives Ellison Medical Foundation New Scholar in Aging award

Eben Alsberg, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopedic Surgery has been named a 2008 Ellison Medical Foundation New Scholar in Aging by The Ellison Medical Foundation. Case Western Reserve University was invited to nominate two faculty members to submit a proposal, and A...

Scientists Find new migratory patterns for Mediterranean and Western Atlantic bluefin tuna

New research into the life cycle of Atlantic bluefin tuna shows, for the first time, that Mediterranean and North American bluefin mix substantially as juveniles, but return to their place of birth to spawn. These new research findings have critical implications for how bluefin tuna are managed on...

NIH selects Case Western Reserve University to participate in National Children's Study

CLEVELAND October 3, 2008 Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded $26 million in funding to participate in The National Children's Study, the National Institutes of Health's comprehensive study on the interaction of genes and the environment on children's health. ...

Case Western Reserve University project ties soil conservation and river management together

CLEVELAND Sediment in rivers comes from erosion of the landscape as well as the erosion and collapse of the banks themselves. Just how much each source contributes to a river and how it affects the flow and path of that river is the subject of research by Peter Whiting, professor of geological ...

Case Western Reserve University researchers track Chernobyl fallout

CLEVELAND - When a reactor in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded in 1986 in what was then the Soviet republic of Ukraine, radioactive elements were released in the air and dispersed over the Soviet Union, Europe and even eastern portions of North America. More than 20 years later, resea...

Case Western Reserve University study looks at keeping migrant workers' children healthy

CLEVELAND As Ohio and Michigan fruit and vegetable farms yield this year's harvest, they also will provide data about the eating choices of Latino migrant children for a Case Western Reserve University researcher. Information gathered this summer will help migrant families understand why their c...

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers receive $10.8 million

The Cleveland Immunopathogenesis Consortium (CLIC), a group of researchers from 10 academic and research institutions across the United States and Canada led by physicians at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, have received a five year, $10.8 million dollar grant from the National...

Ante-partum bed rest moms get active in Case Western Reserve University study

CLEVELANDAfter weeks of bed rest during pregnancy, new mothers need to rebuild muscles and strengthen their stamina. Now a group of women will test new interventions in aiding that recovery during a pilot study at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. "Putting...

Cancer drug delivery research at Case Western Reserve University cuts time from days to hours

CLEVELAND Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed a technique that has the potential to deliver cancer-fighting drugs to diseased areas within hours, as opposed to the two days it currently takes for existing delivery systems. Using laboratory mice, drug delivery time from...

Geneticist Francis Collins named first recipient of Inamori Ethics Prize at Case Western Reserve

CLEVELAND, OH - Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., a physician-geneticist and leader of the Human Genome Project, has been named recipient of the inaugural Inamori Ethics Prize from the Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence at Case Western Reserve University. The Inamori Ethics P...

Tiny dust particles from Asian deserts common over western United States

It has been a decade since University of Washington scientists first pinpointed specific instances of air pollution, including Gobi Desert dust, traversing the Pacific Ocean and adding to the mix of atmospheric pollution already present along the West Coast of North America. Now a UW research...

Threatened bird species finds home at Western

Earlier this year, the bird was assessed with the designation of Threatened by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). COSEWIC is the scientific body that advises the federal government on the status of species at risk. Since 1967, the number of chimney swifts i...

Study finds mercury prevalent in many western fish

A new survey by researchers at Oregon State University and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of more than 600 rivers and streams in the western United States found widespread mercury concentrations in fish. Though few of the more than 2,700 fish analyzed in the study contained alarmingly h...

Case Western Reserve University researchers find protein associated with brain cell death

Neuroscientists at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have found evidence of which protein in the brain's immune cells triggers a cascade of reactions that produces unregulated free radical production that eventually leads to the neural cell death found in Alzheimer's disease. ...

Scientists discover dozens of new species in 'Lost World' of western New Guinea

An expedition to one of Asia's most isolated jungles ?in the mist-shrouded Foja Mountains of western New Guinea ?discovered a virtual ''Lost World" of new species, giant flowers, and rare wildlife that was unafraid of humans. The December 2005 trip by a team of U.S., Indonesian, and Australian sc...

Highest ever winter water temperatures recorded

..., fisheries, aquaculture, coastal communities and more," Dr Cresswell says. The Leeuwin Current forms north of Australia and flows right around the western half of the country, meeting its better known cousin, the East Australian Current (EAC), at Tasmania. The exact location of this meeting point varies ...

Climate-caused biodiversity booms and busts in ancient plants and mammals

...ago strongly influenced plants and animals, spurring a biodiversity boom in western North America, researchers from three research museums report in a paper pu...nd other mammals. In fact, there were more species of mammals living in the western part of North America at that time than at any other time." Woodburne a...

Argonne to showcase science and technology at community open house

... Visualize local, national and international environmental projects with interactive 3-D maps Tours will include the Advanced Photon Source, the western Hemisphere's most brilliant source of X-rays for research; the Center for Nanoscale Materials, a leading nanotechnology research facility; ATLAS, the ...

Restoring a natural root signal helps to fight a major corn pest

...racts nematodes that attack and kill larvae of the western corn rootworm, a voracious root pest. In field tes...USA, Early Edition, August 3𔃅, 2009) The western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) is ...nced the effectiveness of nematodes in controlling western corn rootworm", Hiltpold reports. In rows with E&#...

Fossil plants bring Wilf distinguished speaker honor

...ased on field studies of the latest Cretaceous through the middle Eocene -- 66 to 45 million years ago -- fossil sites in Patagonia, Argentina and the western interior U.S. This time interval shaped the modern world and included the latest Cretaceous climate changes, the end-Cretaceous mass extinction and re...

La Jolla Institute discovers novel tumor suppressor

...olipase C- 3 via SHP-1-Mediated Dephosphorylation of STAT5." Researchers from UC San Diego Cancer Center, University of Alabama and the University of western Ontario also contributed to the study. Dr. Kawakami said he and his research team got their first inkling of something unexpected fairly early on i...

August 2009 Geology and GSA Today media highlights

...ing and dating 205 zircon grains extracted from deep-marine ash beds of the western Karoo (using an high-resolution microprobe [SHRIMP-RG] at Stanford Universi...geti, host to megafauna like the steppe bison, woolly mammoth, Yukon horse, western camel, American mastodon, American lion, the short-faced bear and the helme...

Global curbs on overfishing are beginning to work

...em changes." Dr Fulton says surveys conducted up to the mid-1990s showed signs of recovery in ecosystem structure in the North West Shelf region of western Australia, although some species groups had not fully recovered. ...

Extraterrestrial platinum was 'stirred' into the Earth

...Co-authors Dr Marco Fiorentini and Dr Wolfgang Maier from the University of western Australia are delighted that this is a completely academic outcome which ca...very positive collaborations that exist between CSIRO and the University of western Australia," Dr Fiorentini said. ...

Wildfires set to increase 50 percent by 2050

...ignificant deterioration of the air quality in the western United States due to greater presence of smoke. ...t predict the area burned in each ecosystem in the western US. Significantly, the research also predicts a 40% increase in the western United States in the concentration of tiny soot pa...

AAAS Pacific division scientific conference to meet in San Francisco Aug. 14 - 19

...sociation for the Advancement of Science's Pacific Division will convene its 2009 Annual Meeting in San Francisco, bringing together scholars from the western U.S. to share their work. Marking 150 years since publication of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, the 90th annual meeting will focus on sust...

121 breeding tigers estimated to be found in Nepal

... insurgency, encroachment, poaching and illegal trade, the present numbers is a positive sign, but we can't remain unworried. The declining numbers in western Nepal has posed more challenges, needing a concerted effort to save this charismatic endangered species focusing on anti-poaching and illegal wildlife...

Humans lend a hand to critically endangered waterbird

...tural Environment Research Council (NERC), the new study was carried out in western Siem Pang Important Bird Area (IBA), northern Cambodia, where 160-200 of th...." Not all human influence is positive for the endangered ibis, however. western Siem Pang - currently an unprotected site is under imminent threat from la...
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(Date:8/20/2014)... WORCESTER, MA Using population-based screening outcomes of approximately ... states, including four researchers at the University of Massachusetts ... combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public ... programs published in the Aug. 20 issue of the ... JAMA ) showed the rate of SCID in newborns ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... sweet and salty aroma of sunscreen and seawater signals ... now reporting that the idyllic beach vacation comes with ... skin and into the sea, they can become toxic ... the main course for many other marine animals. Their ... & Technology . , Antonio Tovar-Sanchez and David Snchez-Quiles ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... new gene therapy developed by researchers at the University ... protect mice from a life-threatening heart condition caused by ... avenue," said Yi Lai, Ph.D., the leading author of ... School of Medicine,s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology. ... this could lead to a treatment for people with ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Newborn screening expansion offers early diagnosis and treatment to infants with SCID 2Newborn screening expansion offers early diagnosis and treatment to infants with SCID 3Gene therapy protects mice from lethal heart condition, MU researchers find 2
(Date:8/20/2014)... Gray HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, ... rare, colds, flu and other minor infections might trigger a ... children, a new study suggests. Just five out of ... States, said Dr. Heather Fullerton, lead author of the study ... of California, San Francisco Benioff Children,s Hospital. "It seems infections ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... Doheny HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, ... mastectomy has long been an option, but a new study ... "The most common reasons women didn,t undergo reconstruction was ... more surgery or they were focused on their cancer treatment," ... at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, in New York City. ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... common approach to treating kidney failure by removing waste ... for people who suddenly developed the condition, in an ... School of Medicine. , Their findings, published online in ... an aggressive method that is standardly used for people ... benefit to the patient. , "Our findings question the ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... cancer - using Botox. A study presented in the ... shows that cancer growth could be suppressed by eliminating ... cancer stem cells. The approach thus treated the cancer. ... and efficient. The researchers have thus far tested the ... humans. , The nervous system is crucial in regulating ...
(Date:8/20/2014)... August 20, 2014 A common approach ... the blood did not improve survival chances for people ... by experts at the University of Pittsburgh School ... today in the journal PLOS One , suggest ... for people with sudden kidney failure, may not provide ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Study Ties Colds, Flu to Rare Risk of Stroke in Kids 2Health News:Study Ties Colds, Flu to Rare Risk of Stroke in Kids 3Health News:Many Women Who Have Mastectomy Don't Get Breast Reconstruction: Study 2Health News:Many Women Who Have Mastectomy Don't Get Breast Reconstruction: Study 3Health News:Pitt analysis questions use of acute hemodialysis treatment 2Health News:Treating gastric cancer -- with Botox 2Health News:Pitt Analysis Questions Use of Acute Hemodialysis Treatment 2
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