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U of M study identifies risk factors of disordered eating in overweight youth

MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (July 29, 2009) University of Minnesota Project Eating Among Teens (EAT) researchers have identified factors that may increase overweight adolescents' risk of engaging in extreme weight control behaviors such as self-induced vomiting, the use of diet pills, laxatives, and di...

K-State researcher, collaborators study virulence of pandemic H1N1 virus

Laboratory studies at Kansas State University and the work of a K-State researcher are making headway in the effort to control the pandemic H1N1 virus. Juergen Richt is a Regents Distinguished Professor at K-State's College of Veterinary Medicine and is a Kansas Bioscience Authority Eminent Sch...

1 in 6 health workers won't report in flu pandemic -- study by Ben-Gurion U. researchers

BEER-SHEVA, ISRAEL -- July 28, 2009 A study conducted by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health indicates that approximately 16 percent of public health care workers will not report for work in a pandemic flu emergency, regardles...

UTMB study identifies women at risk of gaining excessive weight with injectable birth control

GALVESTON, Texas Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have identified women who are likely to gain weight while using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, more commonly known as Depo-Provera or the birth control shot. These findings dispel the myth that all women who u...

Scripps-led study shows ocean health plays vital role in coral reef recovery

The new research study led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego suggests that by improving overall ocean health, corals are better able to recover from bleaching events, which occur when rising sea temperatures force corals to expel their symbiotic algae, known as z...

$2 million grant aids study of lung cancer in people who never smoked

DALLAS July 21, 2009 Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are among an elite group of cancer scientists to share a $2 million grant to find biomarkers for lung cancer that develops in people who have never smoked. The National Cancer Institute's Early Detection Research Network (EDRN...

University of Miami receives stimulus funds for study of hurricane impacts on structures, ecosystems

MIAMI Hurricanes are the costliest natural disasters that strike the United States. A better understanding of how structures withstand -- or fail to withstand a hurricane could lead to improved construction standards and practices designed to protect human lives and enhance resiliency. The N...

Probiotics help gastric-bypass patients lose weight more quickly, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. New research from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Hospital & Clinics suggests that the use of a dietary supplement after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery can help obese patients to more quickly lose weight and to avoid deficiency of a critical B vitamin. ...

New study ranks 'hotspots' of human impact on coastal areas

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) Coastal marine ecosystems are at risk worldwide as a result of human activities, according to scientists at UC Santa Barbara who have recently published a study in the Journal of Conservation Letters . The authors have performed the first integrated analysis of all coasta...

Work in mice will contribute to the study of hereditary diseases that lead to blindness

This release is available in Spanish . Researchers of the University of Granada (Spain) have used a technique consisting of the induction of neuronal degeneration neuronal for intense light exposure in the mouse's retina that will be helpful for the study of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a g...

UAB study reveals bone coupling factor key to skeletal health

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) have discovered a molecular coupling factor that helps bones grow and remodel themselves to stay strong, a finding that could lead to better bone-building therapies and new osteoporosis drugs, the researchers said Th...

Army study improves ability to predict drinking water needs

AUDIO: When soldiers leave base for a three-day mission, how much water should they bring? Dr. Samuel Cheuvront of the US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine t...

Plant protein 'doorkeepers' block invading microbes, study finds

A group of plant proteins that "shut the door" on bacteria that would otherwise infect the plant's leaves has been identified for the first time by a team of researchers in Denmark, at the University of California, Davis, and at UC Berkeley. Findings from the study, which will appear June 29 in...

Canadian researchers set to study impact of nanomaterials on aquatic ecosystems

Edmonton A team of Canadian scientists and engineers, led by the University of Alberta and the National Research Council of Canada, will collaborate on a $3.39 million, three-year study to assess the potential effects of nanoparticles in specific water environments. "Nanotechnology is a very ...

MS study offers theory for why repair of brain's wiring fails

Scientists have uncovered new evidence suggesting that damage to nerve cells in people with multiple sclerosis accumulates because the body's natural mechanism for repair of the nerve coating called "myelin" stalls out. The study, published today, July 1, 2009, in the print edition of " Genes ...

Oscar Pistorius: Previously confidential study results released on amputee sprinter

Dallas, TX (June 29, 2009) -- A team of experts in biomechanics and physiology that conducted experiments on Oscar Pistorius, the South African bilateral amputee track athlete, have just published their findings in the Journal of Applied Physiology . Some of their previously confidential finding...

NSF provides $3.4 million to study climatically important Agulhas Current

VIRGINIA KEY, Fla. -- The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced that it is funding a study with the goal of building a multi-decadal time series of Agulhas Current volume transport, which will contribute to the Global Ocean Observing System. Led by Principal Investigator, Lisa Beal, Ph...

Plant protein 'doorkeepers' block invading microbes, study finds

A group of plant proteins that "shut the door" on bacteria that would otherwise infect the plant's leaves has been identified for the first time by a team of researchers in Denmark, at the University of California, Davis, and at UC Berkeley. Findings from the study, which will appear June 29 in...

ESHRE launches international study of polar body screening

Amsterdam, The Netherlands: The efficacy of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has been one of the most hotly disputed subjects in assisted reproduction over the past few years. None of the trials carried out so far has shown conclusively whether it works or not. Now the European Society of H...

Environmental cues control reproductive timing and longevity, University of Minnesota study shows

When humans and animals delay reproduction because food or other resources are scarce, they may live longer to increase the impact of reproduction, according to a new study by University of Minnesota researchers published in the June 25 issue of PLoS (Public Library of Science) One . The disco...

UT San Antonio researcher wins $917,000 from NIH to study memory

San Antonio Every 16 hours, give or take, the brain's hippocampus makes six to nine thousand new neurons in the dentate gyrus, the portion of the brain which is believed to play a significant role in the preservation of episodic, or autobiographical, memory. But how do those neurons store info...

Gene predicts how brain responds to fatigue, human study shows

New imaging research in the June 24 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience helps explain why sleep deprivation affects some people more than others. After staying awake all night, those who are genetically vulnerable to sleep loss showed reduced brain activity, while those who are genetically resi...

U of M study finds new insight on therapy for a devastating parasitic disease

MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (June 23, 2009) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have discovered an important new insight into how a commonly prescribed drug may work to treat those infected by a parasitic flatworm. The Schistosomasis parasite infects about 200 million ...

U of Minnesota-led study finds that hunters are depleting lion and cougar populations

Sport hunters are depleting lion and cougar populations as managers respond to demands to control predators that threaten livestock and humans, according to a study published in the June 17 issue of PLoS ONE . The study was led by Craig Packer, a University of Minnesota professor and renowned aut...

UBC researchers develop new method to study gambling addictions

UBC researchers have created the world's first animal laboratory experiment to successfully model human gambling. The advance will help scientists develop and test new treatments for gambling addictions, a devastating condition that affects millions worldwide. In addition to showing that rats ...

CU-Boulder study shows Maya intensively cultivated manioc 1,400 years ago

A University of Colorado at Boulder team has uncovered an ancient and previously unknown Maya agricultural system -- a large manioc field intensively cultivated as a staple crop that was buried and exquisitely preserved under a blanket of ash by a volcanic eruption in present-day El Salvador 1,400...

IUPUI study finds living near fast food outlet not a weighty problem for kids

INDIANAPOLIS A new study by Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) researchers contradicts the conventional wisdom that living near a fast food outlet increases weight in children and that living near supermarkets, which sell fresh fruit and vegetables as well as so called junk...

Wildlife Conservation Society supports world's first study of egg-laying mammal

A Wildlife Conservation Society research intern working in the wilds of Papua New Guinea has successfully completed what many other field biologists considered "mission impossible"the first study of a rare egg-laying mammal called the long-beaked echidna. The WCS-supported studywhich consisted...

Embryology study offers clues to birth defects

LA JOLLA, Calif., June 9, 2009 -- Gregg Duester, Ph.D., professor of developmental biology at Burnham Institute for Medical Research (Burnham), along with Xianling Zhao, Ph.D., and colleagues, have clarified the role that retinoic acid plays in limb development. The study showed that retinoic aci...

MU study finds connection between evolution, classroom learning

COLUMBIA, Mo. Over thousands of years, humans have evolved to naturally understand things like facial expressions and social interactions. But a University of Missouri researcher has found there is an ever-widening gap between what humans can naturally learn and what they need to learn to be succ...

Jefferson receives $1.7 million grant to study stem cells in intervertebral discs of the spine

(PHILADELPHIA) Scientists at Jefferson Medical College have received a five-year, $1.7 million National Institutes of Health grant funded by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases to study mechanisms regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation with the...

Tulane receives grant to study limb regeneration

Could the salamander's natural ability to grow back severed appendages lead to a scientific breakthrough for humans who have lost limbs? With the help of a $6.25 million U.S. Department of Defense grant, Tulane University professor Ken Muneoka, the John L. and Mary Wright Ebaugh chair in scienc...

CU-Boulder study shows 53 million-year-old high Arctic mammals wintered in darkness

Ancestors of tapirs and ancient cousins of rhinos living above the Arctic Circle 53 million years ago endured six months of darkness each year in a far milder climate than today that featured lush, swampy forests, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. CU-Boulder...

New study finds lowfat chocolate milk is effective post-exercise recovery aid for soccer players

JUNE 1, 2009, SEATTLE Soccer players and exercise enthusiasts now have another reason to reach for lowfat chocolate milk after a hard workout, suggests a new study from James Madison University presented at the American College of Sports Medicine annual meeting. Post-exercise consumption of lowf...

International Serious Adverse Events Consortium announces initial study results in its global research collaboration to identify genetic markers related to drug induced liver injury

Chicago (June 1, 2009) The International Serious Adverse Events Consortium (SAEC) announced today initial results from its research designed to discover genetic markers that may predict individuals at risk for serious drug induced liver injury (DILI). The SAEC is a nonprofit research corporation...

IFAR contributes to study that finds genes that influence the start of menstruation

(Boston, Mass.)Two scientists at the Institute for Aging Research of Hebrew SeniorLife are part of an international team of investigators that has identified genes that influence the start of menstruation, a milestone of female reproductive health that has lifelong influences on overall health. Th...

The coming of biofuels: Study shows reducing gasoline emissions will benefit human health

President Barack Obama and Energy Secretary Steve Chu are consistent in their message that when it comes to transportation fuels, carbon-neutral biofuels as an alternative to gasoline are coming. While the focus of a shift from gasoline to biofuels has been on global warming, such a shift could al...

Bolivian rainforest study suggests feeding behavior in monkeys and humans have ancient, shared roots

Behavioural ecologists working in Bolivia have found that wild spider monkeys control their diets in a similar way to humans, contrary to what has been thought up to now. Rather than trying to maximize their daily energy intake, the monkeys tightly regulate their daily protein intake, so that it s...

University of Florida study provides insight into evolution of first flowers

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Charles Darwin described the sudden origin of flowering plants about 130 million years ago as an abominable mystery, one that scientists have yet to solve. But a new University of Florida study, set to appear next week in the online edition of the Proceedings of the Nati...

WWF study says climate change could displace millions in Asia's Coral Triangle

Coral reefs could disappear entirely from the Coral Triangle region of the Pacific Ocean by the end of the century, threatening the food supply and livelihoods for about 100 million people, according to a new study from World Wildlife Fund. Averting catastrophe will depend on quick and effecti...
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