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Studies in Biological News

T-STAR grant funds genetic studies on shrimp and papaya and endangered cycad rescue

The projects funded will serve aquaculture and papaya farmers as well as work toward the preservation of an endemic cycad species endangered due to attacks by several species of invasive insects. Hui Gong, an aquaculture researcher with WPTRC, was awarded $186,960 for a genetic variability stud...

UC Davis begins $2.8 million in studies of agricultural nitrogen's impacts

UC Davis researchers will receive $2.8 million in new grants to study the use and impacts of nitrogen, a hero of the agricultural revolution that is increasingly viewed as a worrisome source of water and air pollution and potent greenhouse gases. "This is one of the most important and least pub...

Two new studies on circadian rhythms

Hanover, NHDartmouth Medical School geneticists have made new inroads into understanding the regulatory circuitry of the biological clock that synchronizes the ebb and flow of daily activities, according to two studies published May 15. Research on the relationship between clocks and temperat...

New early detection studies of lung cancer in non-smokers launched today

Government and private sector cancer scientists today launched a research partnership to find biomarkers for lung cancer that develops in people who have never smoked. The research studies are designed to create a better understanding of the biology of lung cancer and to develop a test to detect e...

Scripps studies offer new picture of Lake Tahoe's earthquake potential

For more than a decade, scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have been unraveling the history of fault ruptures below the cobalt blue waters of Lake Tahoe one earthquake at a time. Two new studies by the Scripps research team offer a more comprehensive analysis of eart...

GSA special paper presents new studies of Western US earth motion

Boulder, CO, USA The Great BasinSierra Nevada transition zone has received substantial attention over the past decade, due in part to the recognition that nearly 25% of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates is accommodated along this tectonic boundary. This Geological ...

West Nile virus studies show how star-shaped brain cells cope with infection

A new study published as the cover article for the April 2009 issue of The FASEB Journal ( http://www.fasebj.org ) promises to give physicians new ways to reduce deadly responses to viral infections of the brain and spinal cord. In the report, scientists from Columbia University, NY, detail for...

Autism Speaks funds $5 million to studies on genetic and environmental risk factors for autism

NEW YORK, NY (February 26,2009) Autism Speaks, the nation's largest autism science and advocacy organization, today announced that it has committed $5 million to investigate genetic and environmental risk factors for autism. The project will expand and link two large-scale, multi-site studies fo...

Crib-side studies help struggling newborns go home without feeding tubes

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) A new strategy developed in the Neonatal and Infant Feeding Disorders Program at Nationwide Children's Hospital is helping premature infants and other newborns with severe swallowing difficulties learn to feed on their own. According to a study appearing in the February issue of ...

Web-based case studies help students develop career skills

AMES, IAA survey of employers in the landscape industry revealed the importance of arming landscaping and horticulture students with technical knowledge, practical application, and problem-solving skills. Teaching students the skills necessary to solve complex landscape management decisions is cru...

To improve forecasting earthquakes, NJIT mathematician studies grains

A new and better way to predict earthquakes and avalanches may soon be available to forecasters thanks to mathematical research underway at NJIT. Using mathematical modeling, researchers are investigating how forces and pressures propagate through granular materials. "Computational Homology...

MSU researcher studies ties between cholesterol drugs, muscle problems

EAST LANSING, Mich. A Michigan State University researcher is studying whether the most popular class of cholesterol-lowering drugs may cause muscle problems in users. There is accumulating evidence that the effect statins can have on skeletal muscle including muscle weakness, fatigue and det...

ASU researchers receive NIH awards for studies of malaria and emergent disease

An Arizona State University research team headed by School of Life Sciences Associate Professor Ananias Escalante will share in more than $6.3 million in awards from the National Institutes of Health for three related studies. Two of the studies will examine the ecology and evolution of malaria an...

NIAID funds studies of how SARS and bird flu evade antiviral responses

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NAID), one of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded a contract to the University of Washington (UW) to use systems biology approaches to comprehensively analyze and model the virus-host interactions and cellular response networks ...

6 environmental research studies reveal critical health risks from plastic

Amsterdam, 2 October 2008 - Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates and flame retardants (PBDEs) are strongly associated with adverse health effects on humans and laboratory animals. A special section in the October 2008 issue of Environmental Research, "A Plastic World" provides critical new...

New studies find global warming will have significant economic impacts on Florida coasts

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Leading Florida-based scientific researchers released two new studies today, including a Florida State University report finding that climate change will cause significant impacts on Florida's coastlines and economy due to increased sea level rise. A second study by resear...

Fly studies reveal immune cell responses to tumor and tissue damage

September 17, 2008, Cambridge, UK Knee scrapes and tumor growth might have more in common than you think. The idea that tumor growth triggers the same immune response as a cut or wound was once a highly controversial notion. However, increasing evidence supports the idea that the same ce...

New studies on the Mediterranean diet confirm its effectiveness for chronic disease prevention

Scientists of the Instituto de Nutricin y Tecnologa de los Alimentos (Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology) of the University of Granada (UGR, Spain) have been doing research into the positive effects of Mediterranean diet's ingredients on health. Among these works, there is a new researc...

Cardiac cell transplant studies show promise in cardiac tissue repair

Tampa, Fla. (Sep. 3rd, 2008) Two studies published in the current issue of CELL TRANSPLANTATION (17:6) examine the efficacy of transplanting bone marrow cells (BMCs) for the repair of heart tissue. The first study found that implanting adult cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) in combination...

Landmark studies assess risk of exposure to elevated levels of EMS confirm clear toxicity threshold

Basel, 4 August 2008. New data from studies presented at the XVII International AIDS Conference in Mexico City have provided unprecedented insight into the toxicity of an impurity called ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). The formation of the EMS impurity is a potential by-product of the manufacturing...

During Olympics, Cornell's Max Zhang studies air-quality in Beijing

As the world watches China prepare for the Olympic Games, Cornell researcher Max Zhang has his eye on less visible matters -- the particles in Beijing's air that millions breathe every day, and that many more will be breathing when they descend on the city this summer. The assistant professor i...

New studies predict record land grab as demand soars for new sources of food, energy and wood fiber

LONDON (14 July 2008) -- Escalating global demand for fuel, food and wood fibre will destroy the world's forests, if efforts to address climate change and poverty fail to empower the billion-plus forest-dependent poor, according to two reports released today by the U.S.-based Rights and Resources ...

NJIT applauds students for studies on brain injury, glaucoma and more

A better understanding of brain injury, a way to rejuvenate dead nerve endings and a device allowing patients to monitor their glaucoma at home, number among this years nine winners at NJITs annual provosts student research day. What surprises me every time I walk through this showcase is the s...

Prof. David Kisailus studies engineering and invention on the half-shell

RIVERSIDE, Calif. ( www.ucr.edu ) -- Marine snails, sea urchins, and other animals from the sea are teaching researchers in UC Riversides Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering how to make the world a better place. Consider, for example, the possibilities of designing a lightweigh...

Carnegie Mellon studies how climate change impacts food production

PITTSBURGHThe old adage, We are what we eat, may be the latest recipe for success when it comes to curbing the perils of global climate warming. Despite the recent popular attention to the distance that food travels from farm to plate, aka food miles, Carnegie Mellon researchers Christopher L. W...

Antioxidant users don't live longer, analysis of studies concludes

The vitamin industry has long touted antioxidants as a way to improve health by filling in gaps in diet, but a new review of studies found no evidence that the nutrition supplements extend life. Worse, the review authors said that some antioxidants could increase risk for death. The reviewers w...

Answer to troublesome question of why some genetic assoc. studies have failed replication attempts

Boston, MA - A team of researchers from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), and elsewhere have described a possible reason why some studies have been unable to replicate associations between genes and traits -- namely that the strength of a gene/trait associ...

Turtle studies suggest health risks from environmental contaminants

The same chemicals that keep food from sticking to our frying pans and stains from setting in our carpets are damaging the livers and impairing the immune systems of loggerhead turtlesan environmental health impact that also may signal a danger for humans. Jennifer Keller, a researcher at the ...

RNA-based methods for developmental studies are featured in Cold Spring Harbor Protocols

COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. (Fri., Feb. 1, 2008) This months issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols ( www.cshprotocols.org/TOCs/toc2_08.dtl ) highlights two methods to understand developmental processes in plants and flies. Both methods involve work with RNA and are freely accessible on the Web ...

Iowa State researcher studies how enzymes break down cellulose

AMES, Iowa Peter Reilly pointed to the framed journal covers decorating his office. Each of the six showed the swirling, twisting, complicated structure of an enzyme. Those bright and colorful illustrations are the work of his lab. And theyre part of Reillys work to understand how the structur...

New studies suggest brain overgrowth in 1-year-olds linked to development of autism

Boca Raton, FL, December 8, 2007 Brain overgrowth in the latter part of an infants first year may contribute to the onset of autistic characteristics, according to research presented today at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) annual meeting. These findings support concurrent ...

Experts from Stevens, Merck, publish joint paper, 'Biosynthetic Studies of Platensimycin'

HOBOKEN, N.J. Stevens Institute of Technologys Professor Athule B. Attygalle and his doctoral student Kithsiri B. Herath have collaborated with Merck Pharmaceuticals Dr. Sheo B. Singh on a study whose findings have been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, in a paper titled ...

New studies on schizophrenia, depression, trauma and autism highlight annual meeting

WHAT: The 2007 American College of Neuropsychopharmacology Annual Meeting will feature hundreds of new studies on brain and behavior from the worlds leading scientists. Presentations include innovative research on potential new treatments for depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, autism a...

2 carotid artery stenting studies show results comparable to AHA guidelines

Washington D.C., October 23, 2007 - Two carotid stenting trials examining patient outcomes demonstrated results that are comparable to guidelines established by the American Heart Association (AHA) for patients treated with carotid artery surgery. The results of these studies were presented today ...

LSU professor studies army-ant-following birds

BATON ROUGE In the jungles of Central and South America, a group of birds has evolved a unique way of finding food by following hordes of army ants and letting them do all the work. Robb Brumfield, assistant curator of genetic resources at the LSU Museum of Natural Science and assistant profe...

Clinical studies show REMICADE reduces incidence of bowel surgeries in ulcerative colitis patients

PHILADELPHIA, PA, October 15, 2007- Clinical data presented today at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) show that REMICADE significantly reduces the incidence of colectomy surgeries for patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC). Accordin...

NIH awards researcher $1.5 million 'new innovator' grant for fruit-fly studies of prion proteins

GALVESTON, Texas -- The National Institutes of Health has selected University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) Assistant Professor of Neurology Pedro Fernandez-Funez to receive a five-year, $1.5 million NIH Directors New Innovator Award. NIH Director Dr. Elias Zerhouni will officiall...

Claims of sex-related differences in genetic association studies often not properly validated

A review of previous research suggests that prominent claims of sex differences of gene-disease associations are often insufficiently documented and validated, according to an article in the August 22/29 issue of JAMA. In the human genome era, for many common diseases, published research has of...

PRS And EmSense Partner To Integrate Bio-Sensory Measures In Packaging Research Studies

CHICAGO, July 21 /PRNewswire/ -- Last week at the IIR Shopper Insights Conference, Perception Research Services International (PRS) and EmSense Corporation announced their partnership to include bio-sensory measures within quantitative packaging research studies. The companies pres...

Analysis finds strong match between molecular, fossil data in evolutionary studies

During a seminar at another institution several years ago, University of Chicago paleontologist David Jablonski fielded a hostile question: Why bother classifying organisms according to their physical appearance, let alone analyze their evolutionary dynamics, when molecular techniques had already ...
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(Date:4/17/2014)... West Orange, NJ. April 16, 2014. Kessler Foundation ... for $1.8 million from the Department of Defense ... PhD, is principal investigator for the randomized, double-blinded, ... to improve bone and muscle strength after spinal ... Human Performance & Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation. ...
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Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Kessler Foundation awarded Department of Defense grant for spinal cord injury research 2Pocket-sized anthrax detector aids global agriculture 2Pocket-sized anthrax detector aids global agriculture 3Patented research remotely detects nitrogen-rich explosives 2
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Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:New pain relief targets discovered 2Health News:The ilk of human kindness 2Health News:Building 'smart' cell-based therapies 2Health News:Is Parkinson's an autoimmune disease? 2Health News:Re-emergence of Ebola focuses need for global surveillance strategies 2Health News:Re-emergence of Ebola focuses need for global surveillance strategies 3
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