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Stanford in Biological News

Probiotics help gastric-bypass patients lose weight more quickly, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. New research from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Hospital & Clinics suggests that the use of a dietary supplement after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery can help obese patients to more quickly lose weight and to avoid deficiency of a critical B vitamin. ...

Kornberg Associates Architects Selected to Develop Design for New Stanford University Imaging Center

MENLO PARK, Calif., June 29 /PRNewswire/ -- Kornberg Associates | Architects ( www.kornberg.com ) has been selected by Stanford University to design a new Cognitive & Neurobiological Imaging Center. Ken Kornberg, president and founder, made the announcement. The firm has worked with Sta...

From stem cells to new organs: Stanford and NYU scientists cross threshold in regenerative medicine

By now, most people have read stories about how to "grow your own organs" using stem cells is just a breakthrough away. Despite the hype, this breakthrough has been elusive. A new report published in the March 2009 issue of The FASEB Journal ( http://www.fasebj.org ) brings bioengineered organs ...

Biofuels boom could fuel rainforest destruction, Stanford researcher warns

Farmers across the tropics might raze forests to plant biofuel crops, according to new research by Holly Gibbs, a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford's Woods Institute for the Environment. "If we run our cars on biofuels produced in the tropics, chances will be good that we are effectively bur...

New World post-pandemic reforestation helped start Little Ice Age, say Stanford scientists

The power of viruses is well documented in human history. Swarms of little viral Davids have repeatedly laid low the great Goliaths of human civilization, most famously in the devastating pandemics that swept the New World during European conquest and settlement. In recent years, there has been...

Powerful online tool for protein analysis provided pro bono by Stanford geneticist

STANFORD, Calif. Scientists around the world may benefit from a powerful new database, available for free online, that will help them to home in on the parts of proteins most necessary for their function. Arend Sidow, PhD, associate professor of pathology and of genetics at the Stanford Univer...

Cell movements totally modular, Stanford study shows

STANFORD, Calif. A study describing how cells within blood vessel walls move en masse overturns an assumption common in the age of genomics that the proteins driving cell behavior are doing so much multitasking that it would be near impossible to group them according to a few discrete functions....

Key link in how plants adapt to climate discovered by Stanford researchers

How many mouths does a plant need in order to survive? The answer changes depending on climate, and some of the decisions are made long before a new leaf sprouts. Stanford researchers have found that the formation of microscopic pores called stomata (derived from the Greek word stoma, meaning m...

Circadian clock may be critical for remembering what you learn, Stanford researchers say

The circadian rhythm that quietly pulses inside us all, guiding our daily cycle from sleep to wakefulness and back to sleep again, may be doing much more than just that simple metronomic task, according to Stanford researchers. Working with Siberian hamsters, biologist Norman Ruby has shown tha...

4 Stanford faculty named Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators

Four Stanford researchers have joined the ranks of investigators for the prestigious Howard Hughes Medical Institute. They join the 14 current HHMI investigators at Stanford, 11 of which are at the School of Medicine. There are 304 HHMI investigators nationwide. Stanford's recipients are: ...

Sierra Nevada rose to current height earlier than thought, say Stanford geologists

Geologists studying deposits of volcanic glass in the western United States have found that the central Sierra Nevada largely attained its present elevation 12 million years ago, roughly 8 or 9 million years earlier than commonly thought. The finding has implications not only for understanding ...

Energy Crossroads conference April 30 and May 1 at Stanford University

A conference devoted to exploring ways to broaden the use of clean, sustainable energy will take place April 30 and May 1 at Stanford University. Energy Crossroads, a student organization founded at Stanford that aims to reduce society's dependence on fossil fuels, is presenting the conference,...

Inflammation triggers cell fusions that could protect neurons, Stanford research shows

STANFORD, Calif. - Chronic inflammation triggers bone marrow-derived blood cells to travel to the brain and fuse with a certain type of neuron up to 100 times more frequently than previously believed, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. After the fusion, th...

Clues to ancestral origin of placenta emerge in Stanford study

STANFORD, Calif. - Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have uncovered the first clues about the ancient origins of a mother's intricate lifeline to her unborn baby, the placenta, which delivers oxygen and nutrients critical to the baby's health. The evidence suggests the p...

Group led by Stanford physicist says there's an urgent need for nuclear detectives

A terrorist nuclear explosion devastates Manhattan, but no group takes credit. The pressure on the U.S. president to retaliate is intense. Acting on sketchy information, the president orders an attack, but it turns out to be the wrong terrorists, in the wrong country. Things go downhill from there...

Sleepless for science: Flies show link between sleep, immune system in Stanford study

Go a few nights without enough sleep and you're more likely to get sick, but scientists have no real explanation for how sleep is related to the immune system. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine are finding that fruit flies can point to the answers. What they have lear...

Stem cell transplants explored at Stanford as a possible treatment for hearing loss

Stefan Heller's dream is to someday find a cure for deafness. As a leader in stem cell-based research on the inner ear at the Stanford University School of Medicine, he's got a step-by-step plan for making this dream a reality. It may take another decade or so, but if anyone can do it, he'...

RNAi shows promise in gene therapy, Stanford researcher says

Three years ago Mark Kay, MD, PhD, published the first results showing that a biological phenomenon called RNA interference could be an effective gene therapy technique. Since then he has used RNAi gene therapy to effectively shut down the viruses that cause hepatitis and HIV in mice. With th...

To slow AIDS in Russia, treat HIV-positive addicts, Stanford study says

The key to combating AIDS in Russia may be to treat HIV-infected drug users. A new model estimating the spread of HIV in Russia suggests that treating injection drug users with antiretroviral medication will slow transmission of the virus among the general population. The study, which will ap...

Salk and Stanford teams join forces to reveal two paths of neurodegeneration

Wiring the developing brain is like creating a topiary garden. Shrubs don't automatically assume the shape of ornamental elephants, and neither do immature nerve cells immediately recognize the "right" target cell. Abundant foliage, either vegetal or neuronal, must first sprout and then be sculpted...

For Stanford scientists, RNAi gene therapy takes two steps forward, one step back

Three years ago Mark Kay, MD, PhD, published the first results showing that a hot new biological phenomenon called RNA interference was an effective gene-therapy technique in mice. That finding kicked off an RNAi gene therapy research flurry amongst both academic and industry research groups. Now...

Chocolate, wine, spicy foods may be OK for heartburn, Stanford study finds

Patients have been known to hug Lauren Gerson, MD, so overjoyed are they at hearing her words. What does she say to them? Go ahead and eat chocolate. Indulge your passion for spicy cuisine. Drink red wine. Enjoy coffee when you want it, have that orange juice with breakfast and, what the heck, eat ...

For one Stanford doctor, the beat goes on during open-heart surgery

In a Stanford Hospital surgery room on a recent afternoon, heart surgeon Kai Ihnken demonstrated how he repositions the beating heart while it's still inside the chest of a 78-year-old man undergoing triple bypass surgery. The surgeon reached into the chest, lifted the beating heart out, then crane...

Learning to love bacteria: Stanford scientist highlights bugs' benefits

Bacteria are bad. Mothers and doctors, not to mention the cleaning product industry, repeatedly warn of their dangers. But a Stanford University School of Medicine microbiologist is raising the intriguing idea that persistent bacterial and viral infections have benefits. Stanley Falkow, PhD, the ...

Sooner is better with cochlear implants, Stanford scientist shows

Cochlear implants allow the deaf to hear. Their brains learn to understand the artificial electrical stimulation that the implants provide to the cochlea as sound. A Stanford neurobiologist teamed with child-development specialists at the University of Maryland to see if children with cochlear im...

Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy fixes frail muscle cells in animal model, Stanford study finds

A new gene therapy technique that has shown promise in skin disease and hemophilia might one day be useful for treating muscular dystrophy, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine. In the study, scheduled to be published online in the Proceedings of the N...

Stem cell training program to make its Stanford debut

Nature is a seemingly endless storehouse of interesting ?and potentially life-saving ?biological molecules. But tracking down and harvesting those chemicals in their natural form can be time-consuming, expensive and unreliable. Now Salk scientists have discovered a new way of bringing “bio-prosp...

Young Blood Revives Aging Muscles, Stanford Researchers Find

Any older person can attest that aging muscles don't heal like young ones. But it turns out that's not the muscle's fault. A study in the Feb. 17 issue of Nature shows that it's old blood that keeps the muscles down. The study, led by Thomas Rando, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and n...

First real-time view of developing neurons reveals surprises, say Stanford researchers

Scientists have believed that neurons need a long period of fine-tuning and training with other neurons before they take on their adult role. But after using new technology for the first time to watch these cells develop, a team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine found tha...

Same mutation aided evolution in many fish species, Stanford study finds

After decades of laboratory work studying how animals evolve, researchers sometimes need to put on the hip waders, pull out the fishing net and go learn how their theory compares to the real world. According to a Stanford University School of Medicine study published in the March 25 issue of Scienc...

Obama administration announces more than $327 million in Recovery Act funding for science research

...lion for an experimental end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source to study high energy density plasmas; and $1.8 million for improvements at the stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory; Princeton, NJ$13.8 million, including $8.8 million for a variety of initiat...

New hope for fisheries

...cies collapses, an increase in fish size and fish abundance. "Below MMSY there is a fishing-conservation sweet spot," says co-author Steven Palumbi of stanford University, "where economic and ecosystem benefits converge." The team also notes that in addition to reducing exploitation rates below MMSY, there...

August 2009 Geology and GSA Today media highlights

...By analyzing and dating 205 zircon grains extracted from deep-marine ash beds of the western Karoo (using an high-resolution microprobe [SHRIMP-RG] at stanford University), Fildani et al. have discovered that the important Permian-Triassic boundary is marine in the southwestern sector of the basin, making the...

U Alberta researcher in same group as Darwin and Hawking

...e activities as a new fellow of the Royal Society." Vederas joined the University of Alberta in 1977. He obtained a bachelor of science degree from stanford University and a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Vederas has received several awards for research and teaching at the U of A. He h...

UT multimedia program increases middle school interest in science

...wed students from fifth to eighth grade and found a 7.2 percent increase in stanford 10 Achievement scores for students who participated in the HEADS UP program compared to students of similar background who did not. stanford Achievement Tests are one of the leading standardized tests used in school ...

Double success for Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia scientists working on chromosome segregation

...ugal, last year to head the Epigenetic Mechanisms group. The Nature Cell Biology paper, published online this week, in collaboration with a group at stanford University School of Medicine, provides new insights into the scaffold of proteins that ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell divisi...

Stanford researchers publish comprehensive model for medical device development

...oduct development more effectively, researchers at stanford University have published the first comprehensive ...epartment of management science and engineering at stanford University. "Depending on the type and complexity ...y, and a consulting professor of bioengineering in stanford University's BioDesign Program. "The challenge for...

Study highlights massive imbalances in global fertilizer use

...d nutrients to too much, and both extremes have substantial human and environmental costs," said lead author Peter Vitousek, a professor of biology at stanford University and senior fellow at Stanford's Woods Institute for the Environment. "Some parts of the world, including much of China, use far to...

Protein that triggers plant cell division revealed by researchers

...ch other, a process called asymmetric division. Scientists know how this happens in animals, but the process in plants has been a mystery. Now stanford biologists have found a plant protein that appears to play a key role in this type of cell division. The presence of the protein, called BASL, is vita...

Geography and history shape genetic differences in humans

...around the world. The study, conducted by a team from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the University of Chicago, the University of California and stanford University, is published June 5 in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics . In recent years, geneticists have identified a handful of genes that ha...
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