Navigation Links
One in Biological News

Fox Chase researchers uncover one force behind the MYC oncogene in many cancers

Philadelphia (July 27, 2009) DLX5, a gene crucial for embryonic development, promotes cancer by activating the expression of the known oncogene, MYC, according to researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center. Since the DLX5 gene is inactive in normal adults, it may be an ideal target for future anti-...

Possible drug target found for one of the most aggressive breast cancers

Grand Rapids, Mich. (July 8, 2009) Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) investigators have identified a gene that could be an important therapeutic target in the treatment of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. Currently, patients with these cancers have few treatment options. "Breast...

New device detects heart disease using less than one drop of blood

Testing people for heart disease might be just a finger prick away thanks to a new credit card-sized device created by a team of researchers from Harvard and Northeastern universities in Boston. In a research report published online in The FASEB Journal ( http://www.fasebj.org ), they describe h...

A quicker, cheaper SARS virus detector -- one easily customizable for other targets

Members of a USC-led research team say they've made a big improvement in a new breed of electronic detectors for viruses and other biological materials one that may be a valuable addition to the battle against epidemics. It consists of a piece of synthetic antibody attached to a nanowire that'...

Sulphur in just one hair could blow a terrorist's alibi

A group of researchers from the LGC Chemical Metrology Laboratory in the United Kingdom and the University of Oviedo, Spain, have come up with a method to detect how the proportions of isotopes in a chemical element (atoms with an equal number of protons and electrons but different numbers of neut...

Preclinical work shows how one gene causes severe mental retardation

Durham, N.C., and Chapel Hill, N.C. -- Researchers at Duke University Medical Center and the University of North Carolina have discovered in mice how a single disrupted gene can cause a form of severe mental retardation known as Angelman syndrome. In a study published in the journal Nature N...

'Annals of the ESA' selected as one of 100 most influential journals

A poll conducted by the BioMedical & Life Sciences Division (DBIO) of the Special Libraries Association (SLA) to identify the 100 most influential journals of biology and medicine over the last 100 years listed Annals of the Entomological Society of America among them. In the poll, 686 DBIO memb...

Desert woodrats switch one dietary poison for another

As the U.S. Southwest grew warmer between 18,700 and 10,000 years ago, juniper trees vanished from what is now the Mojave Desert, robbing woodrats of their favorite food. Now biologists have narrowed the hunt for detoxification genes that let the rodents eat the toxic creosote bushes that repla...

Desert woodrats switch one dietary poison for another

As the U.S. Southwest grew warmer between 18,700 and 10,000 years ago, juniper trees vanished from what is now the Mojave Desert, robbing woodrats of their favorite food. Now biologists have narrowed the hunt for detoxification genes that let the rodents eat the toxic creosote bushes that repla...

Research model may one day 'inoculate' elderly against slip-related falls

BETHESDA, Md. (Feb 4, 2009) - Training people to avoid falls by repeatedly exposing them to unstable situations in the laboratory helped them to later maintain their balance on a slippery floor, according to new research from the Journal of Neurophysiology . The study furthered the understandi...

Four, three, two, one . . . pterosaurs have lift off

Pterosaurs have long suffered an identity crisis. Pop culture heedlessly and wrongly lumps these extinct flying lizards in with dinosaurs. Even paleontologists assumed that because the creatures flew, they were birdlike in many ways, such as using only two legs to take flight. Now comes w...

In lung cancer, silencing one crucial gene disrupts normal functioning of genome

PHILADELPHIA While examining patterns of DNA modification in lung cancer, a team of international researchers has discovered what they say is a surprising new mechanism. They say that "silencing" of a single gene in lung cancer led to a general impairment in genome-wide changes in cells, contribu...

Less than one month to opening of world’s largest global congress on osteoporosis

More than 4,000 health professionals are expected to attend the upcoming IOF World Congress on Osteoporosis (IOF WCO) to be held from December 3 7, 2008 in Bangkok, Thailand. Detailed information about the congress is available on the IOF website at www.iofbonehealth.org IOF and the Thai Os...

New fossil tells twisted tale of how flatfishes ended up with two eyes on one side of head

CHICAGOA newly identified fossil and the reinterpretation of previously known fossils, all from Europe and about 50 million years old, fill in a "missing link" in the evolution of flatfishes and explain one of nature's most extraordinary phenomena. All living flatfishes, which include halibut, ...

Fixing the education digital disconnect one video game at a time

WASHINGTON DC On Thursday, 22 May 2008, the Federation of American Scientists (FAS) will launch Immune Attack TM, an exciting, fun and fast-moving video game that teaches the critical scientific facts of immunology. The cutting-edge game is designed to teach how the immune system works to def...

Plague of kangaroos threatens one of Australia's last remaining original native grasslands

This release is available in German . Canberra/Leipzig. Australian Department of Defence is currently culling hundreds of kangaroos on the outskirts of the capital Canberra that have produced heated discussions and hit international headlines. Australia's iconic animal has multiplied so m...

PNNL reaches goal to change world one light at a time

RICHLAND, Wash. How many employees does it take to change an incandescent light bulb to a more environmentally friendly one" When it comes to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, that figure is approximately 1,000. Thats the number of staff members who recently committed to participate in the n...

Algae could one day be major hydrogen fuel source

ARGONNE, Ill. (April 1, 2008) As gas prices continue to soar to record highs, motorists are crying out for an alternative that wont cramp their pocketbooks. Scientists at U.S. Department of Energys Argonne National Laboratory are answering that call by working to chemically manipulate algae for...

Rice's West honored as one of Texas' best researchers

HOUSTON, Jan. 10, 2008 -- Rice University bioengineer Jennifer West is being recognized today with one of the Lone Star State's highest scientific honors, the O'Donnell Award from The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST). The O'Donnell Awards, given for excellence in m...

Titanium Group Announces Biometric Contract with One of the Most Active Clinics in Hong Kong

New Applications of Titanium's Core Technology in the Health Care Industry SAN JOSE, Calif., Nov. 27 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Titanium Group, Ltd (OTC Bulletin Board: TTNUF), a leading biometric and security solutions provider announced today it has signed a contract with Hong Kong Polytechnic...

Weight loss -- not one size fits all

There is no "one size fits all" when it comes to weight loss through exercise, says Queensland University of Technology behavioural scientist Neil King. Dr Neil King, from QUT's Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, is the lead author of a study conducted in collaboration with the Univ...

Genetic differences in clover make one type toxic

That clover necklace you make for your child could well be a ring of poison. Thats because some clovers have evolved genes that help the plant produce cyanide to protect itself against little herbivores, such as snails, slugs and voles, that eat clover. Other clover plants that do not make cyani...

Ancient whale fall from California's Ao Nuevo Island one of youngest, most complete known

Berkeley -- A fossilized whale skeleton excavated 20 years ago amid the stench and noise of a seabird and elephant seal rookery on California's A o Nuevo Island turns out to be the youngest example on the Pacific coast of a fossil whale fall and the first in California, according to University of ...

Ancient whale fall from California's Año Nuevo Island one of youngest, most complete known

Berkeley -- A fossilized whale skeleton excavated 20 years ago amid the stench and noise of a seabird and elephant seal rookery on California's A o Nuevo Island turns out to be the youngest example on the Pacific coast of a fossil whale fall and the first in California, according to University of ...

Paracetamol, one of most used analgesics, could slow down bone growth

In Medicine, paracetamol is used to soothe every kind of pain, from simple molar pain to pain produced by bone fractures. This medicine is one of the most used nowadays. However, research carried out at the Departamento de Enfermeria of the University of Granada showed that taking paracetamol ...

Village bird study highlights loss of wildlife knowledge from one

Our ability to conserve and protect wildlife is at risk because we are unable to accurately gauge how our environment is changing over time, says new research out today in Conservation Letters . The study shows that people may not realise species are declining all around them, or that their l...

100 percent of pregnant women have at least one kind of pesticide in their placenta

Human beings are directly responsible for more than 110,000 chemical substances which have been generated since the Industrial Revolution. Every year, we "invent" more than 2,000 new substances, most of them contaminants, which are emitted into the environment and which are consequently present in ...

Deconstructing brain wiring, one neuron at a time

Researchers have long said they won't be able to understand the brain until they can put together a "wiring diagram" ?a map of how billions of neurons are interconnected. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have jumped what many believe to be a major hurdle to preparing th...

Corals that can fight global warming may one day help fragile reefs

While humans can survive large temperature fluctuations, such species as corals are only comfortable within a 12-degree temperature range. And rising global temperatures appear to be threatening their survival, according to Drew Harvell, Cornell professor of ecology and evolutionary biology. Howe...

Cure for cancer one step closer

The cure for cancer is one step closer this week with the first collections of cancer tissue taking place at the new Wesley Research Institute Tissue Bank. The Tissue Bank is the first of its kind in Queensland to provide a widely available and diversified collection of ethically consented and cl...

Scientists identify molecular cause for one form of deafness

Scientists exploring the physics of hearing have found an underlying molecular cause for one form of deafness, and a conceptual connection between deafness and the organization of liquid crystals, which are used in flat-panel displays. Within the cochlea of the inner ear, sound waves cause the ba...

Lab research may one day lead to cancer treatment using patient's own immune cells

A new line of developing research is underway that hopes to use a patient's own immune cells to fight cancer. The field, known as adoptive immunotherapy, is a specialty procedure performed in only a handful of institutions, which may one day include University Hospitals Case Medical Center. Juli...

Free drug samples influence prescribing, say one in three doctors

One in three doctors agree that free drug samples influence prescribing, finds a small but representative US survey published in the Journal of Medical Ethics. But they also think that other doctors are more likely to be influenced by incentives than they are, the data show. In March 2003, t...

Male contraception: One door opens, another closes

We have often heard that a new male contraceptive is "five to ten years" away. But are we getting any closer? The answer may finally be "yes." This week marked the announcement of one hot new lead and one dead end. A door opens Researchers in Italy and at the Population Council in New Yo...

A wolf in sheep's clothing: Plague bacteria reveal one of their virulence tricks

The bacterium that causes the plague belongs to a virulent family of bacteria called Yersinia, a group that also includes a pathogen responsible for food poisoning. These bacteria insert into their host cells proteins and other virulence factors, which kill by -- among other things -- disrupting th...

PLoS ONE is launched by the Public Library of Science

Until now, online scientific journals have been little more than electronic versions of the printed copy. Today, that all changes with the launch of PLoS ONE, which publishes primary research from all areas of science and employs both pre- and post-publication peer review to maximize the impact of ...

Biological motors sort molecules one by one on a chip

Researchers from Delft University of Technology's Kavli Institute of Nanoscience have discovered how to use the motors of biological cells in extremely small channels on a chip. Based on this, they built a transport system that uses electrical charges to direct the molecules individually. To demons...

All the eggs in one basket

Current conservation assessments of endangered Caribbean sea turtles are too optimistic, according to Loren McClenachan and colleagues from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. McClenachan, Jeremy Jackson and Marah Newman agree that conservation efforts since the 1970's have dramatically helpe...

For Stanford scientists, RNAi gene therapy takes two steps forward, one step back

Three years ago Mark Kay, MD, PhD, published the first results showing that a hot new biological phenomenon called RNA interference was an effective gene-therapy technique in mice. That finding kicked off an RNAi gene therapy research flurry amongst both academic and industry research groups. Now...

UCLA paper examines how one disease may prevent another

The knowledge that one disease may prevent the onset of another is not new. For example, the discovery that cowpox vaccines can prevent smallpox dates back to 1798. Dr. E. Richard Stiehm, a professor of pediatrics at the Mattel Children's Hospital at UCLA, researched examples throughout medical h...
Other Tags
(Date:10/17/2014)... is critical and pertinent for practicing physicians and clinicians ... epidemic. The Journal, Disaster Medicine and Public Health ... and Public Health, to surround the public, medical professionals ... moment. , On October 17, the journal published ... primer was prepared by Dr. Eric Toner, internist and ...
(Date:10/17/2014)... for the first time how bacteria can grow directly ... the opportunity to get tremendous insights into bacteria behavior ... discovered the bacterial growth in chronic lung infections among ... by the immune cells. The researchers discovered the immune ... bacteria, forcing the bacteria to switch to a much ...
(Date:10/16/2014)... body. Battles are won, lost or sometimes end ... as tumor dormancy—can last up to 25 years ... poorly understood. , A new computational model ... Professor of Chemistry at Princeton University, may help ... switch to a malignant state. Published today in ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Scientists opens black box on bacterial growth in cystic fibrosis lung infection 2Modeling tumor dormancy 2
(Date:10/25/2014)... (PRWEB) October 26, 2014 BioSkinLaser.Com, the ... the most advanced and improved laser treatments for its ... safe treatments like the lip enhancement treatment . ... with specific focus areas of each customer. , BioSkinLaser.Com ... cellulite reduction NYC . The company cited that it ...
(Date:10/25/2014)... Background: , In 1998 Bob Savage ... a pioneer in the field of establishing recovery community organizations. ... system and when he retired, he set out to answer ... service. , 1. Where are the people ... , 2. Can the recovery community be organized to ...
(Date:10/25/2014)... Homeowners that are wondering how they can ... no more. Clean Crawls gives 5 signs of ... when it comes to insulation in their recently released ... by Clean Crawls, can cause problems throughout your entire ... has deteriorated, become damp, or been infested with pests ...
(Date:10/25/2014)... HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 ... -- herpes simplex -- might increase the risk of Alzheimer,s ... being a carrier of certain antibodies to the virus can ... "The identification of a treatable cause [herpes simplex] of ... researcher Dr. Hugo Lovheim, an associate professor in the department ...
(Date:10/25/2014)... Randy Dotinga HealthDay ... As more genetic tests are developed that spot increased risks ... be more proactive about getting screened. But a new ... not change behavior: People who found out their genes doubled ... people with average risk to get screened. "It didn,t ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:BioSkinLaser.Com Now Offers Advanced Medical Aesthetics Procedures 2Health News:BioSkinLaser.Com Now Offers Advanced Medical Aesthetics Procedures 3Health News:CCAR Accepting Nominations for the Bob Savage Recovery Advocate of the Year Award 2Health News:5 Signs Indicating That Insulation Needs Replacing as Told By Clean Crawls in Recent Article 2Health News:Studies Link Cold Sore Virus to Alzheimer's Risk 2Health News:Studies Link Cold Sore Virus to Alzheimer's Risk 3Health News:Knowing Genetic Risk for Cancer May Not Change Behavior 2
Other Contents