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Troubled waters: Low Apalachicola River flow may hurt gulf fisheries

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- Reductions in the flow of the Apalachicola River have far-reaching effects that could prove detrimental to grouper and other reef fish populations in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, according to a new Florida State University study that may provide new ammunition for states e...

Babies born to native high-altitude mothers have decreased risk of low birth weight

BETHESDA, Md. (May 18, 2009) Pregnant women who are indigenous to the Andes Mountains deliver more blood and oxygen to their fetuses at high altitude than do women of European descent. The study helps explain why babies of Andean descent born at high altitude weigh more than European babies born a...

A low dose of caffeine when pregnant may damage the heart of offspring for a lifetime

A new study published online in The FASEB Journal shows that the equivalent of one dose of caffeine (just two cups of coffee) ingested during pregnancy may be enough to affect fetal heart development and then reduce heart function over the entire lifespan of the child. In addition, the researche...

100-meter sprint world record could go as low as 9.48 seconds

2008 was a great summer for sports' fans. World records tumbled at the Beijing Olympics. Usain Bolt shattered both the 100m and 200m world records, knocking tenths of a second off each. People have been getting faster and faster over the last few decades, which made marathon runner Mark Denny, fro...

Pitt research finds that low concentrations of pesticides can become toxic mixture

PITTSBURGH Ten of the world's most popular pesticides can decimate amphibian populations when mixed together even if the concentration of the individual chemicals are within limits considered safe, according to University of Pittsburgh research published Nov. 11 in the online edition of Oecologia...

Milk may help bacteria survive against low levels of antibiotics

Milk may help prevent potentially dangerous bacteria like Staphylococcus from being killed by antibiotics used to treat animals, scientists heard today (Monday 8 September 2008) at the Society for General Microbiology's Autumn meeting being held this week at Trinity College, Dublin. Bacteria so...

Heavy metal link to mutations, low growth and fertility among crustaceans in Sydney Harbor tributary

Heavy metal pollutants are linked to genetic mutations, stunted growth and declining fertility among small crustaceans in the Parramatta River, the main tributary of Sydney Harbour, new research shows. The finding adds to mounting evidence that toxic sediments and seaweeds in Sydney Harbour are...

Eating fish may explain very low levels of heart disease in Japan

PITTSBURGH, July 28 Consuming large quantities of fish loaded with omega-3 fatty acids may explain low levels of heart disease in Japan, according to a study led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health slated for the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of...

New NOAA coral bleaching prediction system calls for low level of bleaching in Caribbean this year

A new NOAA coral bleaching prediction system indicates that there will be some bleaching in the Caribbean later this year, but the event will probably not be severe. NOAA issued the first-ever seasonal coral bleaching outlook this week at the 11th International Coral Reef Symposium in Ft. Lauderda...

Even low levels of air pollution may pose stroke risk

ANN ARBOR, Mich.---Short-term exposure to low levels of particulate air pollution may increase the risk of stroke or mini-stroke, according to findings that suggest current exposure standards could be insufficient to protect the public. "The vast majority of the public is exposed to ambient ai...

Carnegie Mellon researchers urge development of low carbon electricity

PITTSBURGHCarnegie Mellon Universitys Constantine Samaras and Kyle Meisterling report that plug-in hybrid electric vehicles could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that fuel global warming, but the benefits are highly dependent on how the electricity system changes in the coming decades. ...

Exposure to low levels of radon appears to reduce the risk of lung cancer, new study finds

WORCESTER, Mass. March 25, 2008 -- Exposure to levels of radon gas typically found in 90 percent of American homes appears to reduce the risk of developing lung cancer by as much as 60 percent, according to a study published in the March 2008 issue of the journal Health Physics. The finding diffe...

BARACLUDE data show low resistance over 5 years in nucleoside-naive hepatitis B patients

(PRINCETON, NJ, March 24, 2008) New BARACLUDE (entecavir) data presented today demonstrated a continued low incidence of resistance in nucleoside-nave patients through five years of treatment. In the nucleoside-nave chronic hepatitis B patients analyzed, no additional patient developed resistanc...

Unfavorable ocean conditions likely cause of low 2007 salmon returns along West Coast

NOAA scientists are reviewing unusual environmental conditions in the Pacific Ocean as the likely culprit for the dramatically low returns of Chinook and coho salmon to rivers and streams along the West Coast of the United States in 2007. Researchers from NOAAs Northwest and Southwest Fisheries...

Oregon researchers study widespread areas of low oxygen off northwest coast

A team of scientists studying the California Current a slow-moving mass of cold water that travels south along the coast from British Columbia to Baja California are seeing increasing areas of water off Washington and Oregon with little or no oxygen, possibly resulting in the deaths of marine an...

Human deaths from shark attacks hit 20-year low last year

GAINESVILLE, Fla. Fatal shark attacks worldwide dipped to their lowest levels in two decades in 2007 with the sole casualty involving a swimmer vacationing in the South Pacific, according to the latest statistics from the University of Florida. Except for 1987, when there were no fatalities, t...

Eltrombopag effective for hepatitis C patients with low blood-platelet counts

NEW YORK (Dec. 28, 2007) -- For patients with hepatitis C, having a low blood platelet count is a frequent complication associated with advanced disease. This problem is compounded by the fact that standard antiviral treatment for the disease can further reduce platelet numbers to dangerously low ...

Why diving marine mammals resist brain damage from low oxygen

SANTA CRUZ, CA-- No human can survive longer than a few minutes underwater, and even a well-trained Olympic swimmer needs frequent gulps of air. Our brains need a constant supply of oxygen, particularly during exercise. Contrast that with Weddell seals, animals that dive and hunt under the Ant...

Dartmouth researchers show effects of low dose arsenic on development

HANOVER, NH -- A team of Dartmouth Medical School (DMS) researchers has determined that low doses of arsenic disrupt the activity of a hormone critical in development. The finding is further evidence that arsenic at low doses (at levels found in U.S. drinking water in some areas) can be harmful...

Study shows some athletic men may risk low bone density

COLUMBIA, Mo. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, osteoporosis affects more than 2 million men in the United States and nearly 12 million more have osteopeniaclinically significant low bone density that is less severe than osteoporosis. Now, a new study from the University of Miss...

Researchers find evidence linking stress caused by the Sept. 11 disaster with low birth weights

Researchers have found evidence of an increase in low birth weights among babies born in and around New York City in the weeks and months after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. Writing in the journal Human Reproduction [1], they suggest that stress may have contributed to the effec...

USC biomedical team to participate in $6 million low vision project

An interdisciplinary team of biomedical researchers from the USC Viterbi School, the College and the Keck School of Medicine of USC has received a $6-million Bioengineering Research Partnership grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to begin designing visual aids for millions of older ...

Heat stress influences low conception of dairy herds

Reproductive efficiency has suffered a dramatic decrease since the mid 1980s despite rapid worldwide progress in genetics and management of high producing dairy herds. The reasons for the decline in fertility are multifactorial and cannot be solely attributed to an increase in milk production. We ...

High blood pressure, low energy -- a recipe for heart failure

Aug. 10, 2007 -- Many people with long-standing high blood pressure develop heart failure. But some don't. Daniel P. Kelly, M.D., and colleagues at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and other institutions are trying to figure out what could explain that difference. Their late...

Arctic ice on the verge of another all-time low

Following last summer's record minimum ice cover in the Arctic, current observations from ESA's Envisat satellite suggest that the extent of polar sea-ice may again shrink to a level very close to that of last year. Envisat observations from mid-August depict that a new record of low sea-ice co...

Colorectal cancer screening rates still too low

PHILADELPHIA Although colorectal cancer screening tests are proven to reduce colorectal cancer mortality, only about half of U.S. men and women 50 and older receive the recommended tests, according to a report in the July 2008 issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention , a journal o...

WHO data confirms low level of resistance to Tamiflu

New data published by the World Health Organisation (WHO) has confirmed a low frequency of resistance to Tamiflu (oseltamivir) over 3 influenza seasons (2003 ?2006)1. The information, published by the Neuraminidase Inhibitor Susceptibility Network in the WHO’s Weekly Epidemiological Record, ha...

Like salty food? Chances are you had low blood sodium when you were born

A new study concludes that low birthweight babies born with low sodium (salt) in their blood serum will likely consume large quantities of dietary sodium later in life. In the study, researchers also found that newborns with the most severe cases of low sodium blood serum consumed ~1700 mg more so...

Faster, low cost sequencing technologies needed to drive era of personalized medicine

DNA testing is transforming health care and medicine, but current technologies only give a snapshot of an individual's genetic makeup. Any patient wanting a complete picture of their inherited DNA, or genome, would drop their jaw at the sight of the bill -- to the current tune of $10 million or mor...

Fast test for low blood flow in dogs detects early heart trouble

Working with dogs and using the latest in imaging software and machinery, also known as a 64-slice CT scanner, Johns Hopkins heart specialists have developed a fast and accurate means of tracking blood that has been slowed down by narrowing of the coronary arteries. Researchers say it took them le...

Adolescent but not adult hamsters are more aggressive on low dose of fluoxetine

New research offers tantalizing clues as to why some teenagers taking common anti-depressants may become more aggressive or kill themselves. The research is published in the October Behavioral Neuroscience, which is published by the American Psychological Association (APA). Neuroscientists at th...

Very low birth weight linked to reduced quality of life in pre-school children

Babies with very low birth weights tend to have a much lower quality of life when they are three or four years old, according to a study published in the latest issue of the UK-based Journal of Advanced Nursing. Researchers assessed 118 children who had birth weights of 1500g or less and compare...

H9N2 avian flu vaccine paired with adjuvant provokes strong human immune response at low doses

When combined with an immune-boosting substance called an adjuvant, low doses of an experimental vaccine against a strain of avian influenza (H9N2) provoked a strong antibody response in human volunteers, report scientists supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAI...

How low can you go? Ants learn to limbo

Have you ever tried to do the limbo? For ants it's a way of life! Scientists at the University of Zurich have discovered that ants are able to learn how to visually judge the height of horizontal barriers so that they can successfully crawl under it without slowing down. Tobias Seidl will be presen...

NIH stimulus funding supports Emory biomedical scientists

...ise or injury or bad, enabling the growth of a tumor. This project examines Syk, a molecule that appears to push blood vessels to grow in response to low oxygen. Finding ways to block such growth signals could generate new tools to fight cancer. New treatments for epilepsy: Some epilepsy patients can...

Scientists find universal rules for food-web stability

...ions. To enable computer simulations of such systems, scientists often have to make simplifying assumptions, keeping the number of model parameters as low as possible. Yet, the computational demands of such simulations are high and their relevance is often limited. Innovative methodology Scientist...

Climate-caused biodiversity booms and busts in ancient plants and mammals

...r, giraffes and antelopes, among others) appeared on the scene. But then, as temperatures declined again, the number of mammal genera dropped to a low of 84, with the complete loss of many mammalian groups that previously were well represented. Lower temperatures and a dryer climate continued to infl...

Symposium to discuss geoengineering to fight climate change at the ESA Annual Meeting

...rground reservoirs. Jackson says that this solution has the potential to store more than a century's worth of electric power emissions at a relatively low cost. He notes, however, that some potential risks of geologic sequestration include carbon leakage and the potential for interactions with groundwate...

New DNA and RNA aptamers offer unique therapeutic advantages

... at www.liebertpub.com/oli Aptamers offer several advantages compared to protein or small molecule drugs, most notably their ease of production, low risk of inducing an immune reaction in humans, and amenability to chemical modifications that enhance their drug-like properties, including improved s...

New insights into health and environmental effects of carbon nanoparticles

...rred nanoparticles to other flies, and realized that such transfer could also occur between flies and humans in the future. The transfer involved very low levels of nanoparticles, which did not have adverse effects on the fruit flies. Since larvae can tolerate very high doses of nanoparticles in the die...
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