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First human gets new antibody aimed at hepatitis C virus

Boston, Mass. Building upon a series of successful preclinical studies, researchers at MassBiologics of the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) today announced the beginning of a Phase 1 clinical trial, testing the safety and activity of a human monoclonal antibody they developed ...

Rodent size linked to human population and climate change

You probably hadn't noticed -- but the head shape and overall size of rodents has been changing over the past century. A University of Illinois at Chicago ecologist has tied these changes to human population density and climate change. The finding is reported by Oliver Pergams, UIC research ass...

Reprogramming human cells without inserting genes

WORCESTER, Mass. A research team comprised of faculty at Worcester Polytechnic Institute's (WPI) Life Sciences and Bioengineering Center (LSBC) and investigators at CellThera, a private company also located at the LSBC, has discovered a novel way to turn on stem cell genes in human fibroblasts (s...

First genetically-engineered malaria vaccine to enter human trials

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute scientists have created a weakened strain of the malaria parasite that will be used as a live vaccine against the disease. The vaccine, developed in collaboration with researchers from the US, Japan and Canada, will be trialled in humans from early next year. Mala...

University of Minnesota research leads to new technology to protect human health

Larry Wackett and Michael Sadowsky, members of the University of Minnesota's BioTechnology Institute, developed an enzyme that is used in Bioo Scientific's new MaxDiscovery Melamine Test kit, which simplifies the detection of melamine contamination in food. Melamine is an industrial chemical that ...

Researchers design first model motor nerve system that's insulated and organized like the human body

Amsterdam, 21 July 2009 - In the July issue of Biomaterials , published by Elsevier, researchers from the University of Central Florida (UCF) report on the first lab-grown motor nerves that are insulated and organized just like they are in the human body. The model system will drastically improv...

Skin-like tissue developed from human embryonic stem cells

BOSTON (July 21, 2009) Dental and tissue engineering researchers at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine and the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts have harnessed the pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to generate complex, multilayer tissues that mimic hu...

New study ranks 'hotspots' of human impact on coastal areas

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) Coastal marine ecosystems are at risk worldwide as a result of human activities, according to scientists at UC Santa Barbara who have recently published a study in the Journal of Conservation Letters . The authors have performed the first integrated analysis of all coasta...

Springer to collaborate with the Human Genome Organization

Starting in October 2009, Springer will publish The HUGO Journal in cooperation with the Human Genome Organisation (HUGO). Formerly published at Springer as Genomic Medicine, The HUGO Journal has a new design, new features and a new editorial team. Members of HUGO will receive free access to...

Ben-Gurion U. researchers reveal connection between cancer and human evolution

BEER-SHEVA, ISRAEL, July 2, 2009 Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have discovered that gene mutations that once helped humans survive may increase the possibility for diseases, including cancer. The findings were recently the cover story in the journal Genome Research . ...

Research network wins approximately £5.7 million to target human and animal diseases in Africa

Deadly diseases including plague, Ebola and Rift Valley Fever are being targeted as part of a new multi-million pound international partnership involving African researchers and the London International Development Centre (LIDC). The Southern African Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance (SAC...

NIST issues human milk and blood serum SRMs for contaminant measurements

Responding to scientists' need to measure organic contaminants in human body fluids, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has recently made four new Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) available for purchase. Developed in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and ...

Chromosomal problems affect nearly all human embryos

Amsterdam, The Netherlands: For the first time, scientists have shown that chromosomal abnormalities are present in more than 90% of IVF embryos, even those produced by young, fertile couples. Ms Evelyne Vanneste, a PhD student in the Centre for Human Genetics and the University Fertility Center, ...

Female human embryos adjust the balance of X chromosomes before implantation

Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Dutch researchers have found the first evidence that a process of inactivating the X chromosome during embryo development and implantation, which was known to occur in mice but unknown in humans, does, in fact, take place in human female embryos prior to implantation in...

Scripps Research scientists observe human neurodegenerative disorder in fruit flies

La Jolla, CA, June 24, 2009 -- A team of scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, Katholeike Universiteit Leuven, and the University of Antwerp, Belgium, among other institutions, has created a genetically modified fruit fly that mimics key features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a common ...

Gene predicts how brain responds to fatigue, human study shows

New imaging research in the June 24 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience helps explain why sleep deprivation affects some people more than others. After staying awake all night, those who are genetically vulnerable to sleep loss showed reduced brain activity, while those who are genetically resi...

Mouse model provides clues to human language development

In the brains of the mice the researchers found alterations which may be closely linked to speech and language development. Their analyses comprise part of an international study led by the Leipzig Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. The findings have been published in the current ...

A Canada-wide technology platform for mapping the human interactome

Montral, June 23, 2009 On June 18, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) announced the award of $9.16 million for the creation of a national technology platform aimed at mapping the human interactome. This national platform, headed by Dr. Benoit Coulombe from the Institut de recherches clini...

NIH expands Human Microbiome Project; funds sequencing centers and disease projects

The Human Microbiome Project has awarded more than $42 million to expand its exploration of how the trillions of microscopic organisms that live in or on our bodies affect our health, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today. The human microbiome is all the microorganisms that...

Tumor suppressor gene in flies may provide insights for human brain tumors

SINGAPORE and DURHAM, N.C. In the fruit fly's developing brain, stem cells called neuroblasts normally divide to create one self-renewing neuroblast and one cell that has a different fate. But neuroblast growth can sometimes spin out of control and become a brain tumor. Researchers at Duke-NU...

Fate in fly sensory organ precursor cells could explain human immune disorder

HOUSTON (June 21, 2009) Notch signaling helps determine the fate of a number of different cell types in a variety of organisms, including humans. In an article that appears in the current issue of Nature Cell Biology , researchers at Baylor College of Medicine report that a new finding about th...

World Day to Combat Desertification focuses on human security

Human security is under threat from desertification, land degradation and drought. Combating this threat requires an integrated international response, which is why the theme for this year's World Day to Combat Desertification is 'Conserving land and water = Securing our common future'. Deserti...

'The Vision Revolution': Eyes are the source of human 'superpowers'

Troy, N.Y. For Mark Changizi, it's all in the eyes. About half of the human brain is used for vision, and sight is the best understood and most thoroughly investigated of the five senses. This is why Changizi, a neurobiology expert and assistant professor in the Department of Cognitive Science...

Powe Award supports research on how enzymes enable the pathogenicity of 2 human disease organisms

Blacksburg, Va. -- Pablo Sobrado, assistant professor of biochemistry ( http://www.biochem.vt.edu/faculty.php?lname=Sobrado&view=yes ) with the infectious disease research group at Virginia Tech, has received a Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award for his research on enzymes that are ess...

NIH funds $9.5 million for research on HIV and the human innate immune system

CLEVELAND Studying how the mouth wards off diseases will have implications for understanding overall how people stay healthy. The Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine will use a five-year, $9.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute for Dent...

Climate change could drive vast human migrations

By mid-century, people may be fleeing rising seas, droughts, floods and other effects of changing climate, in migrations that could vastly exceed the scope of anything before, says a major new report. The document, authored by researchers at Columbia University's Center for International Eart...

Scientists examine human behavior and the threat of disease

KNOXVILLE -- As swine flu spread from Mexico to Texas and then fanned out farther in the United States, Americans began to alter their behavior. Families kept children home from school, postponed trips to the mall, and stayed home instead of eating out. In so doing, the American population may hav...

Combined stem cell-gene therapy approach cures human genetic disease in vitro

LA JOLLA, CAA study led by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, has catapulted the field of regenerative medicine significantly forward, proving in principle that a human genetic disease can be cured using a combination of gene therapy and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell t...

The coming of biofuels: Study shows reducing gasoline emissions will benefit human health

President Barack Obama and Energy Secretary Steve Chu are consistent in their message that when it comes to transportation fuels, carbon-neutral biofuels as an alternative to gasoline are coming. While the focus of a shift from gasoline to biofuels has been on global warming, such a shift could al...

DNA-Prokids: Genetic identification against traffic in human beings

This release is available in Spanish . DNA-Prokids ( http://www.dna-prokids.org ), an international project on human trafficking prevention and fight using genetic identification of victims and their relatives, was officially presented today, at the University of Granada (UGR) headquar...

Researchers gain genome-wide insights into patterns of the world's human population structures

Through sophisticated statistical analyses and advanced computer simulations, researchers are learning more about the genomic patterns of human population structure around the world. Revealing such patterns provides insights into the history of human evolution, the predominant evolutionary forc...

WARF signs license agreement with Pfizer for human embryonic stem cells

MADISON Pfizer Inc., a major biopharmaceutical company, and the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), the private, nonprofit patenting and licensing organization for the University of Wisconsin-Madison, announced May 5 that they have signed a license for human embryonic stem (hES) cell pat...

Scientists shed light on inner workings of human embryonic stem cells

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) Scientists at UC Santa Barbara have made a significant discovery in understanding the way human embryonic stem cells function. They explain nature's way of controlling whether these cells will renew, or will transform to become part of an ear, a liver, or any other part...

Tiny differences in our genes help shed light on the big picture of human history

By examining very small differences in people's genes, scientists from Cornell University have developed a new tool for identifying big events in human history and pinpointing the origins of specific gene mutations. This research, published in the May issue of the journal GENETICS ( http://www.g...

UC Davis launches 'One Health' care for wild mountain gorillas and human neighbors

The University of California, Davis, today launched a new "One Health" program to conserve the world's remaining 740 mountain gorillas by caring for not only the gorillas but also the people and the other animals that share their home in the forests of central Africa. With $750,000 in funding f...

Learning how the pieces responsible for interpreting the human genome work

The human genome complete sequencing project in 2003 revealed the enormous instruction manual necessary to define a human being. However, there are still many unanswered questions. There are few indications on where the functional elements are found in this manual. To explain how we develop, scien...

Mouse model provides a new tool for investigators of human developmental disorder

April 21, 2009, Cambridge, UK Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome (WHS) is a human disease caused by spontaneous genetic deletions. Children born with WHS have a characteristic set of facial features, including a wide flat nose bridge, downturned mouth, high forehead, and highly arched eyebrows. Other sym...

New human study reinforces antioxidant benefits of tart cherries

April 19, 2009, NEW ORLEANS --- Eating just one and a half servings of tart cherries could significantly boost antioxidant activity in the body, according to new University of Michigan research reported at the 2009 Experimental Biology meeting in New Orleans. 1 In the study, healthy adults who at...

Newly discovered epidermal growth factor receptor active in human pancreatic cancers

Finally some promising news about pancreatic cancer, one of the most fatal cancers, due to the difficulties of early detection and the lack of effective therapies: Johns Hopkins University pathologist Akhilesh Pandey has identified an epidermal growth factor receptor aberrantly active in approxima...

Early family ties: No sponge in the human family tree

Since the days of Charles Darwin, researchers are interested in reconstructing the "Tree of Life", and in understanding the development of animal and plant species during their evolutionary history. In the case of vertebrates, this research has already come quite a long way. But there is still muc...
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