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Genome in Biological News

Springer to collaborate with the Human Genome Organization

Starting in October 2009, Springer will publish The HUGO Journal in cooperation with the Human Genome Organisation (HUGO). Formerly published at Springer as Genomic Medicine, The HUGO Journal has a new design, new features and a new editorial team. Members of HUGO will receive free access to...

New national genome center launched

A new UK national genome centre is being officially opened today (3 July) by Nobel Laureate and genome pioneer Prof Sir John Sulston and the Lord-Lieutenant of Norfolk. The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) will further the UK's capacity in genomics - the science of understanding the genetic makeup...

Scientists sequence genome of the N2-fixing, soil-living bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii

Blacksburg, Va. A collaboration of researchers, which includes scientists at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute (VBI) and Virginia Tech, have completed the genome sequence of Azotobacter vinelandii , uncovering important genetic information that will contribute to a more complete understandin...

A genome may reduce your carbon footprint

Madison, WI, May 11, 2009 -- With the costs of genome sequencing rapidly decreasing, and with the infrastructure now developed for almost anyone with access to a computer to cheaply store, access, and analyze sequence information, emphasis is increasingly being placed on ways to apply genome data ...

Stowers researchers develop whole genome sequencing approach for mutation discovery

The Stowers Institute's Hawley Lab and Molecular Biology Facility have developed a "whole-genome sequencing approach" to mapping mutations in fruit flies. The novel methodology promises to reduce the time and effort required to identify mutations of biological interest. The work was published in t...

Bovine genome provides clues to possible new developments

Scientists from Texas AgriLife Research and the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) are part of a consortium of researchers who have developed an annotated sequence of the cattle genome which could lead to better disease resistance and higher quality mea...

Learning how the pieces responsible for interpreting the human genome work

The human genome complete sequencing project in 2003 revealed the enormous instruction manual necessary to define a human being. However, there are still many unanswered questions. There are few indications on where the functional elements are found in this manual. To explain how we develop, scien...

Free online toolkit provides standard measures for genome and population studies

The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health, today announced the release of the first version of a free online toolkit aimed at standardizing measurements of research subjects' physical characteristics and environmental exposures. The tools will ...

New book, 'Untangling the Double Helix,' explores enzymes responsible for maintaining genome integrity

COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. If it were not for a group of enzymes called topoisomerases, DNA would become a knotted, coiled, dysfunctional mess inside of a cell as it gets twisted, rolled, unzipped, and pulled by the cellular machinery that reads and copies its sequence. Topoisomerases, which are r...

University of Michigan installs second Genomatix Genome Analyzer

Genomatix Software, a leading provider of complete solutions for the analysis of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) data, announced today that the CCDU Bioinformatics Core of the Center for Computational Medicine and Biology at the University of Michigan installed a Genomatix Genome Analyzer (GGA) a...

Elephant shark genome sequence leads to discovery of color perception in deep-sea fish

The elephant shark, a primitive deep-sea fish that belongs to the oldest living family of jawed vertebrates, can see color much like humans can. This discovery, published in the March 2009 issue of Genome Research , may enhance scientists' understanding of how color vision evolved in early ve...

JCVI program trains USDA scientists on eukaryotic genome analysis

As part of the ongoing mission to train and educate scientists on the latest tools, methods and advances in genomics, the J. Craig Venter Institute's (JCVI) Eukaryotic Genome Annotation and Analysis Team will travel to Lubbock, TX March 3rd-5th to train 40 United States Agriculture Department (USD...

Ancestral genome of present-day African great apes & humans had burst of DNA sequence duplication

The genome of the evolutionary ancestor of humans and present-day apes underwent a burst of activity in duplicating segments of DNA, according to a study to be published in Nature Feb 12, the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birthday. "The new study shows big differences in the genomes ...

Sequencing of sorghum genome completed

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. In a paper published in the journal Nature this week, Rutgers researchers Joachim Messing, Rmy Bruggmann, and a team of international collaborators have described the genome of sorghum, a drought-tolerant African grass. The findings could one day help researchers to pr...

Breast cancer genome shows evolution, instability of cancer

HOUSTON (Dec. 15, 2008) A newly published genome sequence of a breast cancer cell line reveals a heavily rearranged genetic blueprint involving breaks and fusions of genes and a broken DNA repair machinery, said researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears online in the jou...

DOE Joint Genome Institute completes soybean genome

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) has released a complete draft assembly of the soybean (Glycine max) genetic code, making it widely available to the research community to advance new breeding strategies for one of the world's most valuable plant c...

Washington University scientists first to sequence genome of cancer patient

For the first time, scientists have decoded the complete DNA of a cancer patient and traced her disease - acute myelogenous leukemia - to its genetic roots. A large research team at the Genome Sequencing Center and the Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis ...

Diatom genome helps explain success in trapping excess carbon in oceans

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. Diatoms, mighty microscopic algae, have profound influence on climate, producing 20 percent of the oxygen we breathe by capturing atmospheric carbon and in so doing, countering the greenhouse effect. Since their evolutionary origins these photosynthetic wonders have come to a...

Complete Genomics launches, becomes world's first large-scale human genome sequencing company

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. Oct. 6, 2008 Complete Genomics Inc., a third-generation human genome sequencing company, today announced its formal launch as the world's first provider of large-scale human genome sequencing services. The company, which was established in March 2006, has been operating...

Worm genome offers clues to evolution of parasitism

The genome of a humble worm that dines on the microbial organisms covering the carcasses of dead beetles may provide clues to the evolution of parasitic worms, including those that infect humans, say scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Max-Planck Institute f...

DOE JGI extends the capabilities of the Integrated Microbial Genome System

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) has extended the capabilities of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) data management system, updated the content of the IMG/M metagenome data management and analysis system, and has launched its educational comp...

Leader of Human Genome Project honored with the Inamori Ethics Prize

CLEVELAND Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., a physician-geneticist and leader of the Human Genome Project, has been awarded with the new Inamori Ethics Prize from the Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence at Case Western Reserve University. Modeled after the Nobel and Kyoto Pri...

ISU researchers help map first plant-parasitic nematode genome sequence

AMES, Iowa -- There are numerous plant-parasitic nematodes in the world, but only a handful are responsible for the largest part of an estimated $157 billion in agricultural damage globally every year. Nematodes are small worms that burrow into plant roots and feed off living cells. Now, Iowa S...

Trichoplax genome sequenced -- 'rosetta stone' for understanding evolution

New Haven, Conn. Yale molecular and evolutionary biologists in collaboration with Department of Energy scientists produced the full genome sequence of Trichoplax , one of nature's most primitive multicellular organisms, providing a new insight into the evolution of all higher animals. The find...

Cataloguing invisible life: Microbe genome emerges from lake sediment

When entrepreneurial geneticist Craig Venter sailed around the world on his yacht sequencing samples of seawater, it was an ambitious project to use genetics to understand invisible ecological communities. But his scientific legacy was disappointing a jumble of mystery DNA fragments belonging to ...

Significant impact factor boost for scientific journal Genome Research

COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. (July 7, 2008) Earlier this month, ThomsonReuters released the 2007 Journal Citation Reports , which includes impact factors for the world's most important scholarly journals. The scientific journal Genome Research , published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, wa...

Duckweed genome sequencing has global implications

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. Three plant biologists at Rutgers' Waksman Institute of Microbiology are obsessed with duckweed, a tiny aquatic plant with an unassuming name. Now they have convinced the federal government to focus its attention on duckweed's tremendous potential for cleaning up pollution, ...

US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute announces new genome sequencing projects

WALNUT CREEK, CAIn the continuing effort to tap the vast, unexplored reaches of the earth's microbial and plant domains for bioenergy and environmental applications, the DOE Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) has announced its latest portfolio of DNA sequencing projects that it will undertake in the...

Brucella abortus S19 genome sequenced; points toward virulence genes

Blacksburg, Va. Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech and the National Animal Disease Center in Ames, Iowa, and collaborators at 454 Life Sciences of Branford, Conn., have sequenced the genome of Brucella abortus strain S19. Strain S19 is a naturally occurring st...

A common aquatic animal's genome can capture foreign DNA

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Long viewed as straitlaced spinsters, sexless freshwater invertebrate animals known as bdelloid rotifers may actually be far more promiscuous than anyone had imagined: Scientists at Harvard University have found that the genomes of these common creatures are chock-full of DNA f...

Scientists decipher fruit tree genome for the first time

This release is available in Spanish . A scientific group of the Universities of Illinois (USA), Georgia (USA), Hawaii (USA) and Nakai (China), among others, have deciphered for the first time fruit genomic sequence, in this case papaya (Carica papaya), according to the cover of the last ...

First analysis of platypus genome may impact disease prevention

BATON ROUGE Theres no doubt about it ... the platypus is one odd duck-billed, egg-laying, lactating mammal. With adaptations like webbed feet to fit its aquatic lifestyle and the poison spurs that decorate males, the platypus represents for many a patchwork of evolutionary development. But LSUs ...

Duck-billed platypus genome sequence published

The first analysis of the genome sequence of the duck-billed platypus was published today by an international team of scientists, revealing clues about how genomes were organized during the early evolution of mammals. The research was supported in part by the National Human Genome Research Institu...

Platypus genome decoded

The curious discovery of the duck-billed, egg-laying, otter-footed, beaver-tailed, venomous platypus in Australia in 1798 convinced British scientists that it must be a hoax. Sketches of its appearance were thought to be impossible. But new research proves that the oddness of the platypus' look...

First draft of transgenic papaya genome yields many fruits

A broad collaboration of research institutions in the U.S. and China has produced a first draft of the papaya genome. This draft, which spells out more than 90 percent of the plants gene coding sequence, sheds new light on the evolution of flowering plants. And because it involves a genetically mo...

Tomato pathogen genome may offer clues about bacterial evolution

Blacksburg, Va.. The availability of new genome sequencing technology has prompted a Virginia Tech plant scientist to test an intriguing hypothesis about how agricultures early beginnings may have impacted the evolution of plant pathogens. Boris Vinatzer, assistant professor of plant pathology...

Software developed by Boston College lab delivers speed and accuracy to genome research

CHESTNUT HILL, MA It took a global corps of scientists approximately $500 million and 13 years to identify the more than 35,000 genes of the human genome. Five years later, Boston College Biologist Gabor Marth and his research team have developed software that can analyze half a million DNA seque...

The beetle's genome sequenced for the first time

75% of all animal species in the world are insects. The largest group within insects are beetles (400,000 species). Beetles can be very beautiful and colorful, but many beetle species are also serious agricultural pests that can destroy food plants like potatoes (the Colorado potato beetle) and th...

K-State contributions to red flour beetle genome sequencing featured in March 27 issue of Nature

MANHATTAN, KAN. -- Most of us hate to find the red flour beetle living happily in the flour sack in our pantries. But for several scientists at Kansas State University, and many others throughout the world, this pest of stored grain and grain products is the best organism for studying genetics. ...

Giant panda genome to be sequenced

BGI-Shenzhen is pleased to announce the launch of the International Giant Panda Genome Project. This announcement follows on the heels of the Panda Genome workshop held on January 2122, 2008, in Shenzhen, China. Dr. Hongmei Zhu, a scientist from BGI-Shenzhen, stated that, "The goal of this project...
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