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Airway cells use 'tasting' mechanism to detect and clear harmful substances

The same mechanism that helps you detect bad-tasting and potentially poisonous foods may also play a role in protecting your airway from harmful substances, according to a study by scientists at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. The findings could help explai...

Parascript Signature Verification Technology Used by Moscow Law Firm to Detect Signature Fraud in $160,000 Debt Collection Case

-- Results from Parascript SignatureXpert confirm that signatures on financial documents were fraudulent, and enabled the Arbitration Court of Moscow to initiate forensic examination and expert study -- BOULDER, Colo., June 22 /PRNewswire/ -- Parascript, LLC, the image analysis and pat...

New way to make sensors that detect toxic chemicals

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio State University researchers have developed a new method for making extremely pure, very small metal-oxide nanoparticles. They are using this simple, fast, and low-temperature process to make materials for gas sensors that detect toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and biol...

New test can detect both genetic and chromosomal abnormalities in embryos

Amsterdam, The Netherlands: One-step screening for both genetic and chromosomal abnormalities has come a stage closer as scientists announced that an embryo test they have been developing has successfully screened cells taken from spare embryos that were known to have cystic fibrosis. They tol...

Parascript Signature Verification Technology Used by Moscow Law Firm to Detect Signature Fraud in $160,000 Debt Collection Case

-- Results from Parascript SignatureXpert confirm that signatures on financial documents were fraudulent, and enabled the Arbitration Court of Moscow to initiate forensic examination and expert study -- BOULDER, Colo., June 22 /PRNewswire/ -- Parascript, LLC, the image analysis and pat...

K-State host to workshop on rapid methods to detect microorganisms in food

Kansas State University once again is host to a noted microbiology workshop that helps the scientists who test food and other samples for microorganisms. K-State's 29th annual Rapid Methods and Automation in Microbiology workshop will be June 19-26. The workshop, now in its 29th year, has serve...

Researcher: Lasers used to detect melamine in baby formula

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - With equipment readily available to health officials and businesses, a Purdue University researcher has found a way to detect trace amounts of melamine in infant formula. Using infrared lasers and light spectroscopy methods, Lisa Mauer, an associate professor of food scie...

Einstein researchers devise a fast and sensitive way to detect ricin

April 8, 2009 (BRONX, NY) Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have developed a simple, accurate, and highly sensitive test to detect and quantify ricin, an extremely potent toxin with potential use as a bioterrorism agent. The report appears as a featured arti...

Portable kit may 1 day detect plant disease before disastrous outbreak

COLLEGE STATION This science may literally be outside the box: A briefcase-sized kit is carried to a field where thousands of tons of food are growing. The search is for microorganisms that could infect and kill the plants, wreaking havoc on the food supply and market. If the equipment in the ...

Researchers create new class of fluorescent dyes to detect reactive oxygen species in vivo

Researchers have created a new family of fluorescent probes called hydrocyanines that can be used to detect and measure the presence of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are highly reactive metabolites of oxygen that have been implicated in a variety of inflammatory diseases, includ...

Bangladesh Voter Registration Project Now Using MegaMatcher Biometric Technology to Detect and Prevent Duplicate Registrations

VILNIUS, Lithuania, Dec. 2 /PRNewswire/ -- Neurotechnology ( http://www.neurotechnology.com ), a provider of biometric identification technologies, today announced that the Bangladesh Army selected MegaMatcher SDK multi-biometric technology to identify duplicate registrations in the nation's voter...

Johns Hopkins researchers detect sweet cacophony while listening to cellular cross-talk

Johns Hopkins scientists were dubious in the early 1980s when they stumbled on small sugar molecules lurking in the centers of cells; not only were they not supposed to be there, but they certainly weren't supposed to be repeatedly attaching to and detaching from proteins, effectively switching th...

Argonne scientists peer into heart of compound that may detect chemical, biological weapons

ARGONNE, Ill. (September 25, 2008) A light-transmitting compound that could one day be used in high-efficiency fiber optics and in sensors to detect biological and chemical weapons at long distance almost went undiscovered by scientists because its structure was too difficult to examine. Lucki...

Photonic crystal biosensors detect protein-DNA interactions

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Scientists at the University of Illinois have developed a new class of disposable, microplate-based optical biosensors capable of detecting protein-DNA interactions. Based on the properties of photonic crystals, the biosensors are suitable for the rapid identification of inhibitor...

Researchers develop new ultrasensitive assay to detect most poisonous substance known

DUARTE, Calif. -- Scientists at City of Hope and the California Department of Public Health have developed a new ultrasensitive assay to detect botulinum neurotoxin. The toxin is one of the most poisonous substances known that can cause life-threatening disease, and is considered a major potenti...

Technology uses live cells to detect food-borne pathogens, toxins

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Researchers have developed a new technology that can simultaneously screen thousands of samples of food or water for several dangerous food-borne pathogens in one to two hours. The technique, which has potential biosecurity and food safety applications, also can estimate ...

Scientists develop a fast system to detect metal concentrations in iron and steel industry workers

This release is available in Spanish . Researchers from the Department of Legal Medicine, Toxicology and Psychiatry of the University of Granada ( UGR ) developed a new method to detect metal concentrations in iron and steel industry workers. Continuous exposure to certain elements const...

MIT's 'electronic nose' could detect hazards

CAMBRIDGE, MAA tiny electronic nose that MIT researchers have engineered with a novel inkjet printing method could be used to detect hazards including carbon monoxide, harmful industrial solvents and explosives. Led by MIT professor Harry Tuller, the researchers have devised a way to print thin...

New system would use rotating magnetic field to detect pathogens

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Researchers at Purdue and Duke universities have developed a technique that uses a magnetic field to selectively separate tiny magnetic particles, representing a highly sensitive method for potentially diagnosing disease by testing samples from patients. Because different...

New magnetic separation technique might detect multiple pathogens at once

DURHAM, N.C. -- A magnetic separation technique developed by researchers at Duke University's Pratt School of Engineering and Purdue University makes it relatively simple to sort through beads hundreds of times smaller than the period at the end of this sentence. The method could lead to new t...

'Twinkle after-effect' can help retinal patients detect vision loss quickly and cheaply

Boston, MAScientists at Schepens Eye Research Institute, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, have discovered a simple and inexpensive way for patients with retinal and other eye disease to keep track of changes in their vision loss. In a study published in this weeks PLoS ONE (October 24, 2007...

Researchers detect hint of oxygen 50 to 100 million years earlier than first believed

RIVERSIDE, Calif. Two teams of scientists, including three researchers from UC Riverside, report that traces of oxygen appeared in Earths atmosphere roughly 100 million years before the Great Oxidation Event 2.4 billion years ago. The Great Oxidation Event is when most geoscientists think atmosph...

Using nanotubes to detect and repair cracks in aircraft wings, other structures

Troy, N.Y. Adding even a small amount of carbon nanotubes can go a long way toward enhancing the strength, integrity, and safety of plastic materials widely used in engineering applications, according to a new study. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a simple new t...

Alternative methods proposed to detect pesticides and antibiotics in water and natural food

Water or food of natural origins (from plants or animals) that we consume on a daily basis can contain unwanted supplies for our organism, such as pesticides or antibiotics. A doctoral thesis carried out by Jorge Juan Soto Chinchilla, from the Department of Analytical Chemistry Department of Anal...

Mice use specialized neurons to detect carbon dioxide in the air

For mice, carbon dioxide often means danger - too many animals breathing in too small a space or a hungry predator exhaling nearby. Mice have a way of detecting carbon dioxide, and new research from Rockefeller University shows that a special set of olfactory neurons is involved, a finding that ma...

Shape changes in aroma-producing molecules determine the fragrances we detect

NEW YORK, December 22, 2008 - Shakespeare wrote "a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." But would it if the molecules that generate its fragrance were to change their shape? That's what Dr. Kevin Ryan, Assistant Professor of Chemistry at The City College of New York (CCNY) and collabor...

Using dental X-rays to detect osteoporosis

Researchers in the Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam have created a unique way of identifying patients at risk of osteoporosis by using ordinary dental x-rays. Professor Paul F. van der Stelt and his team developed the largely automated approach to detecting the disease during a three-year, E...

Colour sensor breath test can detect lung cancer

A breath test can successfully pick up lung cancer with "moderate accuracy" even in the early stages, reveals research published ahead of print in Thorax. It could revolutionise the way cancer is detected and potentially save lives, say the authors. The test comprises a chemical colour senso...

Biodegradable napkin -- featuring sensitive nanofibers -- may quickly detect biohazards

Detecting bacteria, viruses and other dangerous substances in hospitals, airplanes and other commonly contaminated places could soon be as easy as wiping a napkin or paper towel across a surface, says a researcher from Cornell University. "It's very inexpensive, it wouldn't require that someone b...

Silver bullet: UGA researchers use laser, nanotechnology to rapidly detect viruses

Waiting a day or more to get lab results back from the doctor's office soon could become a thing of a past. Using nanotechnology, a team of University of Georgia researchers has developed a diagnostic test that can detect viruses as diverse as influenza, HIV and RSV in 60 seconds or less. In addi...

NYU algorithm enhances ability to detect cancer genes

Researchers at New York University's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences have developed a new algorithm that enhances the ability to detect a cancer gene, and have applied their algorithm to map the set of tumor-suppressor genes involved in lung cancer. The algorithm uses data from Affymetri...

Nanowire arrays can detect signals along individual neurons

Opening a whole new interface between nanotechnology and neuroscience, scientists at Harvard University have used slender silicon nanowires to detect, stimulate, and inhibit nerve signals along the axons and dendrites of live mammalian neurons. Harvard chemist Charles M. Lieber and colleagues re...

Purdue creates new low-cost system to detect bacteria

Researchers at Purdue University have developed a new low-cost system that analyzes scattered laser light to quickly identify bacteria for applications in medicine, food processing and homeland security at one-tenth the cost of conventional technologies. The technique - Bacteria Rapid Detection ...

Researchers win money to develop breath test to detect breast cancer

One of the biggest problems in fighting breast cancer is the lack of inexpensive, early detection diagnostic tools. Researchers at the University of Michigan hope to change that by developing a device to test breath for the presence of metabolites associated with breast cancer. The team won a Br...

Plants used to detect gas leaks, from outer space!

Gas leaks can be potentially life threatening in the home, but the presence of gas stresses out plants too. Professor Mike Steven and colleagues from the University of Nottingham have found that changes in the physical properties of plants can act as an early warning of leaks in natural gas pip...

Researchers use mass spectrometry to detect norovirus particles

Scientists have used mass spectrometry for decades to determine the chemical composition of samples but rarely has it been used to identify viruses, and never in complex environmental samples. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health recently demonstrated that proteomic...

New test to detect rare proteins in blood

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have developed a paradigm-shifting method for detecting small amounts of proteins in the blood. Applications of this method will make discerning low-abundance molecules associated with cancers (such as breast cancer), Alzheimer's dise...

Carbon nanotubes that detect disease-causing mutations developed by Pitt researcher

University of Pittsburgh researcher Alexander Star and colleagues at California-based company Nanomix, Inc., have developed devices made of carbon nanotubes that can find mutations in genes causing hereditary diseases, they report in the Jan. 16 issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Acad...

Carnegie Mellon develops non-invasive technique to detect transplant rejection at cellular level

Carnegie Mellon University scientist Chien Ho and his colleagues have developed a promising tool that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track immune cells as they infiltrate a transplanted heart in the early stages of organ rejection. This pre-clinical advance, described in an upcoming issue...

New nanosensor uses quantum dots to detect DNA

Using tiny semiconductor crystals, biological probes and a laser, Johns Hopkins University engineers have developed a new method of finding specific sequences of DNA by making them light up beneath a microscope. The researchers, who say the technique will have important uses in medical research,...
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