Navigation Links

Tag: "stanford" at biology news

Same mutation aided evolution in many fish species, Stanford study finds

After decades of laboratory work studying how animals evolve, researchers sometimes need to put on the hip waders, pull out the fishing net and go learn how their theory compares to the real world. According to a Stanford University School of Medicine study published in the March 25 issue of Science, Mother Nature is more predictable than lab experiments suggest. . In a diverse group of fish call...

First real-time view of developing neurons reveals surprises, say Stanford researchers

Scientists have believed that neurons need a long period of fine-tuning and training with other neurons before they take on their adult role. But after using new technology for the first time to watch these cells develop, a team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine found that neurons come into this world with a good idea about what they'll become as adults. . The work, whi...

Stem cells from brain transformed to produce insulin at Stanford

With careful coaxing, stem cells from the brain can form insulin-producing cells that mimic those missing in people with diabetes, according to a paper published in the April 26 issue of PLoS Medicine. . .. In past work, Kim and members of his lab enticed mo...

Stanford gut check shows diversity of intestinal ecosystem

The universe of microbes that lives in your stomach may be nearly as unique as your fingerprint, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine who have embarked on the early stages of exploring the intestinal ecosystem. . Using molecular techniques that detect all known types of microbes and borrowing statistical techniques from field ecology and population genetics, Paul...

Young Blood Revives Aging Muscles, Stanford Researchers Find

Any older person can attest that aging muscles don't heal like young ones. But it turns out that's not the muscle's fault. A study in the Feb. 17 issue of Nature shows that it's old blood that keeps the muscles down. .. The study, led by Thomas Rando, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine, built on previous work showing t...

Stanford doctors advance in bid to turn mice stem cells into blood vessels

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have taken a first step toward growing blood vessels from stem cells that could eventually be transplanted into living organisms. . Starting with embryonic stem cells derived from mice, surgical resident Oscar Abilez, MD, and colleagues have successfully differentiated the stem cells into myocytes, one of the building blocks of blood vesse...

Stem cell training program to make its Stanford debut

Nature is a seemingly endless storehouse of interesting ?and potentially life-saving ?biological molecules. But tracking down and harvesting those chemicals in their natural form can be time-consuming, expensive and unreliable. .. . Stéphane Richard, Joseph Noel and Tomohisa Kuzuyama isolated and examined a totally new enzyme that can mix and match biological chemicals to create a wide range of...

Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy fixes frail muscle cells in animal model, Stanford study finds

A new gene therapy technique that has shown promise in skin disease and hemophilia might one day be useful for treating muscular dystrophy, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine. . In the study, scheduled to be published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of Jan. 2, the researchers used gene therapy to introduce a hea...

Sooner is better with cochlear implants, Stanford scientist shows

Cochlear implants allow the deaf to hear. Their brains learn to understand the artificial electrical stimulation that the implants provide to the cochlea as sound. . .. In the Dec. 5 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Scie...

Learning to love bacteria: Stanford scientist highlights bugs' benefits

Bacteria are bad. Mothers and doctors, not to mention the cleaning product industry, repeatedly warn of their dangers. But a Stanford University School of Medicine microbiologist is raising the intriguing idea that persistent bacterial and viral infections have benefits. . Stanley Falkow, PhD, the Robert W. and Vivian K. Cahill Professor in Cancer Research, is publishing his thoughts on this topi...

For one Stanford doctor, the beat goes on during open-heart surgery

In a Stanford Hospital surgery room on a recent afternoon, heart surgeon Kai Ihnken demonstrated how he repositions the beating heart while it's still inside the chest of a 78-year-old man undergoing triple bypass surgery. The surgeon reached into the chest, lifted the beating heart out, then craned his neck to the side, just so, searching for the right spot on the back of the heart to attach the...

Stanford study of owls finds link in brain between sight and sound

Just imagine listening to someone talk and also hearing the buzz of the overhead lights, the hum of your computer and the muffled conversation down the hallway. To focus on the person speaking to you, your brain clearly can't give equal weight to all incoming sensory information. It has to attend to what is important and ignore the rest. . Two scientists at the Stanford University School of Medic...

Stanford/Packard scientist's data-mining technique strikes genetic gold

A new method to mine existing scientific data may provide a wealth of information about the interactions among genes, the environment and biological processes, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Like panning for gold, they used the powerful technique to sift through millions of bits of unrelated information...

Chocolate, wine, spicy foods may be OK for heartburn, Stanford study finds

Patients have been known to hug Lauren Gerson, MD, so overjoyed are they at hearing her words. What does she say to them? Go ahead and eat chocolate. Indulge your passion for spicy cuisine. Drink red wine. Enjoy coffee when you want it, have that orange juice with breakfast and, what the heck, eat a grapefruit, too. Gerson says that for most heartburn patients, there's insufficient evidence to su...

Stanford snake venom study shows that certain cells may eliminate poison

Death by snakebite is horrible. The immediate pain of the bite is followed by swelling, bruising and weakness, then sweating or chills, with numbness, nausea, blurred vision and possibly convulsions before it's all over. Such misery is produced by a veritable witches' brew of toxins in snake venom. . It's long been thought that the body's own immune system, rather than reducing the symptoms, may...

For Stanford scientists, RNAi gene therapy takes two steps forward, one step back

Three years ago Mark Kay, MD, PhD, published the first results showing that a hot new biological phenomenon called RNA interference was an effective gene-therapy technique in mice. That finding kicked off an RNAi gene therapy research flurry amongst both academic and industry research groups. . Now, with three human RNAi gene therapy trials under way, Kay's initial excitement is proving to be on...

Salk and Stanford teams join forces to reveal two paths of neurodegeneration

Wiring the developing brain is like creating a topiary garden. Shrubs don't automatically assume the shape of ornamental elephants, and neither do immature nerve cells immediately recognize the "right" target cell. Abundant foliage, either vegetal or neuronal, must first sprout and then be sculpted into an ordered structure. . Neurons extend fibers called axons to target cells in an exuberant man...

Stanford discovery may help predict when toxoplasma can be deadly

Toxoplasma is arguably the most successful animal parasite on earth: It infects hundreds of species of warm-blooded animals, most notably half of humanity. Its unusual ability to overcome the numerous challenges of infecting and reproducing inside such a wide range of creatures has long intrigued scientists, and now researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified t...

To slow AIDS in Russia, treat HIV-positive addicts, Stanford study says

The key to combating AIDS in Russia may be to treat HIV-infected drug users. A new model estimating the spread of HIV in Russia suggests that treating injection drug users with antiretroviral medication will slow transmission of the virus among the general population. . ..<p...

Drug treatment improves learning in mice with Down syndrome symptoms, Stanford/Packard study shows

A once-a-day, short-term treatment with a drug compound substantially improved learning and memory in mice with Down syndrome symptoms, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. What’s more, the gains lasted for months after the treatment was discontinued. The researchers are now considering a clinical trial to test whether the compound...

Stanford scientists make major breakthrough in regenerative medicine

Findings described in a new study by Stanford scientists may be the first step toward a major revolution in human regenerative medicine—a future where advanced organ damage can be repaired by the body itself. In the May 2007 issue of The FASEB Journal, researchers show that a human evolutionary ancestor, the sea squirt, can correct abnormalities over a series of generations, suggesting that a sim...

RNAi shows promise in gene therapy, Stanford researcher says

Three years ago Mark Kay, MD, PhD, published the first results showing that a biological phenomenon called RNA interference could be an effective gene therapy technique. Since then he has used RNAi gene therapy to effectively shut down the viruses that cause hepatitis and HIV in mice. . With three human RNAi gene therapy trials now under way - two in macular degeneration and one in RSV pneum...

Stem cell transplants explored at Stanford as a possible treatment for hearing loss

Stefan Heller's dream is to someday find a cure for deafness. . .. .. .. But even at the national leve...

Stanford-led study closes in on genes that may predispose some people to severe depression

Some people appear to be genetically predisposed to developing severe depression, but researchers have yet to pin down the genes responsible. Now, a specific region rife with promise has been located on one chromosome by a consortium of researchers working under Douglas Levinson, MD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. . "This fin...

Sleepless for science: Flies show link between sleep, immune system in Stanford study

Go a few nights without enough sleep and you're more likely to get sick, but scientists have no real explanation for how sleep is related to the immune system. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine are finding that fruit flies can point to the answers. . .. "When flies get sick, they stop sleeping," said David Schneider, PhD, assistant professor of microbiology and immuno...
Other Tags
(Date:7/21/2015)... Connecticut , July 21, 2015  NXT-ID, ... "Company"), a biometric authentication company focused on the ... Wocket® smart wallet, announces that it has filed ... System and Method. This invention ... not only authorizes an account, but also the ...
(Date:7/13/2015)... , Jul. 13, 2015 NXT-ID, Inc. ... a biometric authentication company focused on the growing ... filed provisional patent 62/188684 for BEHAVIORAL-DIRECTED ... another new convenient and secure method to make ... innovative payment methods, introduced with its groundbreaking voice-direct ...
(Date:7/9/2015)... , July 9, 2015  Synaptics ... developer of human interface solutions, today announced ... industry,s first fully hardware encapsulated fingerprint sensor ... authentication technology is literally off the grid, ... biometric matching within the fingerprint sensor to ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):NXT-ID Patents Personalized Tokenized Payments for Next Generation Secure Payment Technology 2NXT-ID Patents Personalized Tokenized Payments for Next Generation Secure Payment Technology 3NXT-ID Patents Personalized Tokenized Payments for Next Generation Secure Payment Technology 4NXT-ID Patents Behavior-Directed Payments 2NXT-ID Patents Behavior-Directed Payments 3NXT-ID Patents Behavior-Directed Payments 4Synaptics Announces World's First Match-in-Sensor Fingerprint Authentication Technology 2Synaptics Announces World's First Match-in-Sensor Fingerprint Authentication Technology 3
(Date:7/31/2015)... ... July 31, 2015 , ... Coco Libre announced today that their flagship ... at the 2015 Vans US Open of Surfing, July 25 through August 2 in ... added sugar” on the market, is a natural choice given the Open’s commitment to ...
(Date:7/31/2015)... ... 2015 , ... According to an article published July 2 on ... reach a consensus on the steps that need to be taken to successfully complete ... percent consensus on a series of steps that each surgeon must complete for each ...
(Date:7/31/2015)... ... July 31, 2015 , ... As part of their company mission, ... of animal welfare organizations is essential to the longevity of their business. It ... National Association of Professional Pet Sitters (NAPPS) annual Presents 4 Pets supply drive. ...
(Date:7/31/2015)... MA (PRWEB) , ... July 31, 2015 , ... ... this year’s “HARMONY 2015”, one of the industry’s premier thought leadership symposiums, ... November 5 and 6. The event attracts over 250 “C”-level executives, administrators, ...
(Date:7/31/2015)... ... July 31, 2015 , ... The 2015 ALS Ice Bucket Challenge will ... the Boston Red Sox honor Ice Bucket co-founders Pat Quinn and Pete Frates, the ... to further collaborative efforts among the ALS organizations to find treatments and cures for ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Coco Libre Brings Eco-conscious Hydration to Vans US Open of Surfing 2Health News:Article on Plastic Surgery Consensus Highlights the Duties of Veteran Plastic Surgeons, says Beverly Hills Physicians 2Health News:Article on Plastic Surgery Consensus Highlights the Duties of Veteran Plastic Surgeons, says Beverly Hills Physicians 3Health News:Dallas-based Park Cities Pet Sitter Selects Non-Profit Animal Welfare Organization “Angie’s Friends” as this Year’s Recipient of their Presents 4 Pets Supply Drive. 2Health News:Dallas-based Park Cities Pet Sitter Selects Non-Profit Animal Welfare Organization “Angie’s Friends” as this Year’s Recipient of their Presents 4 Pets Supply Drive. 3Health News:Dallas-based Park Cities Pet Sitter Selects Non-Profit Animal Welfare Organization “Angie’s Friends” as this Year’s Recipient of their Presents 4 Pets Supply Drive. 4Health News:Harmony Healthcare International Announces Speaker Line-up for “HARMONY 2015” 2Health News:Harmony Healthcare International Announces Speaker Line-up for “HARMONY 2015” 3Health News:Major League Baseball Joins MDA and Fourteen Other ALS Organizations to Launch ALS Ice Bucket Challenge 2015 2Health News:Major League Baseball Joins MDA and Fourteen Other ALS Organizations to Launch ALS Ice Bucket Challenge 2015 3Health News:Major League Baseball Joins MDA and Fourteen Other ALS Organizations to Launch ALS Ice Bucket Challenge 2015 4
Other Contents