Navigation Links

Tag: "miss" at biology news

Male circumcision reduces risk of HIV transmission from women to men

The first study to examine the probability of.HIV infection per act of heterosexual sex among a population with.multiple sexual partners has found that uncircumcised men have more.than twice the risk of acquiring HIV than do circumcised men..In the study, published in the Feb. 15 issue of The Journal of.Infectious Diseases, now available online, Jared Baeten and colleagues.from the United States...

Scientists find missing enzyme for tuberculosis iron scavenging pathway

Scientists have discovered that a protein that was originally believed to be involved in tuberculosis antibiotic resistance is actually a "missing enzyme" from the biosynthetic pathway for an agent used by the bacteria to scavenge iron. . .. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is responsible for more morbidity in humans than any other bacteria. The emergence of multi-...

Found: Missing sequence of the human Y chromosome

Scientists report today in the journal Genome.Research that they have successfully cloned and characterized a.previously intractable DNA sequence: a 554-kilobase-pair genomic.segment near the centromere of the human Y chromosome. This sequence.contains eight putatively active genes that could be implicated in.sex-associated height differences and gonadal tumor development. . This.pericentromeric...

Researchers find missing genes of ancient organism

Yale scientists report in the journal Nature that the "missing" genes for tRNA in an ancient parasite are made up by splicing together sequences in distant parts of the DNA genome. .. .. Surprisingly, Söll's...

New studies suggest airborne SARS transmission is possible

Two new studies present evidence that the virus causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) may spread through the air, not just through direct contact with contaminated water droplets as previous research had shown. . SARS coronavirus was detected in the air in a patient's room during the 2003 outbreak in Toronto, according to a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. Ano...

UCLA scientists transform HIV into cancer-seeking missile

Camouflaging an impotent AIDS virus in new clothes enables it to hunt down metastasized melanoma cells in living mice, reports a UCLA AIDS Institute study in the Feb. 13 online edition of Nature Medicine. The scientists added the protein that makes fireflies glow to the virus in order to track its journey from the bloodstream to new tumors in the animals' lungs. .. "For the past 20 years, gene th...

Breast-Cancer Risk Linked to Exposure to Traffic Emissions at Menarche, First Birth

Exposure to carcinogens in traffic emissions at particular lifetime points may increase the risk of developing breast cancer in women who are lifetime nonsmokers, a study by epidemiologists and geographers at the University at Buffalo has found. .. Their study was conducted among women who lived in Erie and Niagara counties of New York State between 1996 and 2001. They found that higher exposure...

Not-for-profit publishers call NIH public access rule a missed opportunity

.. The final National Institutes of Health (NIH) rule on Enhanced Public Access to NIH Research Information is wasteful of federal research dollars and a missed opportunity to take advantage of available technology and existing efforts, according to a group of the nation's leading not-for-profit medical and scientific publishers. The final rule ignores significant free access policies alread...

Reducing malarial transmission in Africa

There are 300 million cases of malaria each year worldwide, causing one million deaths. Around 90% of these deaths occur in Africa, mostly in young children. One of the greatest challenges facing Africa in the fight against malaria is drug resistance; resistance to chloroquine (CQ), the cheapest and most widely used antimalarial, is common throughout Africa, and resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimeth...

HIV-1 spread through six transmission lines in the UK

Contrary to the prevailing belief that the HIV epidemic in the UK can be traced back to one source, a new study suggests that HIV spread via at least six independent virus introductions and subsequent transmission chains. The findings, published in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also suggest that antiviral therapy has not had a significant impact on the g...

Aircraft Cabin Ventilation Influences The Transmission Of Diseases In-flight

Increasing ventilation within aircraft cabins can reduce the spread of infectious diseases in-flight, suggests a review published in this week's issue of THE LANCET. . Mark Gendreau (Lahey Clinic Medical Centre, MA, USA) and colleagues reviewed data from studies looking at the transmission of diseases during commercial air travel. They found that while commercial airlines are a suitable environme...

Antiretroviral Therapy May Prevent HIV Transmission From Breastfeeding Mothers To Infants

Two new studies support the hypothesis that combination antiretroviral drug therapy may reduce the risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission through breastfeeding, findings that could have significant implications in the developing world. . Researchers in the first study found mothers pass antiretroviral medications on to their breastfeeding infants in concentrations high enough to prevent infecti...

Blink, and the brain misses it

We would immediately notice if the outside world suddenly went dark every few seconds. But we rarely become aware of our blinks, even though they cause a similar reduction in the amount of light entering the eye. So why are we not aware of the frequent mini-blackouts caused by blinks? . In the 1980s, scientists discovered that visual sensitivity begins decreasing immediately before a blink, but t...

Missing Receptor Molecule Causes Tumor Growth

A missing receptor molecule contributes to the growth of tumors in human ovaries. This surprisingly evident connection has now been proven by a team at the Medical University of Vienna, who published their data in the science journal Molecular Cancer Research. The team, who is supported by funding from the Austrian Science Fund FWF, also discovered the possible genetic reason why the receptor mol...

'Sinkers' provide missing piece in deep-sea puzzle

One of the biggest questions in modern oceanography is how animals in the deep sea get enough to eat. Marine biologists at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) recently published a paper that helps answer this question, at least for animals that live on the deep seafloor off the coast of Central California. After analyzing hundreds of hours of deep-sea video, Bruce Robison and his...

Study uncovers dirty little secret: Soil emissions are much-bigger-than-expected component of air pollution

Nitrogen oxides produced by huge fires and fossil fuel combustion are a major component of air pollution. They are the primary ingredients in ground-level ozone, a pollutant harmful to human health and vegetation. . .. Nitrogen oxide emissions total more than 40 million metric tons worldwide each year, with 64 percent comin...

Stressed cells spark DNA repair missteps and speed evolution

When Dr. Susan Rosenberg, professor of molecular and human genetics at Baylor College of Medicine, first published her finding that the mutation rate increased in bacteria stressed by starvation, sometimes resulting in a rare change that benefited the bacteria, it was controversial. . .. It all begins with the way that the cell repairs breaks in the double strands of DNA that ar...

European Commission funds EBI to do new research on synergies between bioinformatics and medical informatics

In findings with implications for pandemic influenza, a new study reports for the first time that a less-virulent strain of avian influenza virus can spread from poultry to humans. The research appears in the October 1 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, now available online. . Crossing the species barrier is an important step in the development of a flu virus with pandemic potential. P...

Studies clarify risk factors for mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis C virus

Breastfeeding does not raise the risk of mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV), according to two new studies published in the December 1 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, now available online. . .. The larger of the two studies, conducted by the Europea...

Study uncovers placental microtransfusions lead to transmission of AIDS virus during childbirth

Transmission of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, from pregnant women to their infants sometime during childbirth is a huge international problem, studies have shown. Between 25 percent and 35 percent of babies born to untreated HIV-infected mothers become infected themselves. . .. "The question has always been how does the virus get from the mothers to the babies?" said principal investigator Dr....

Missing fossil link 'Dallasaurus' found

When amateur fossil finder Van Turner discovered a small vertebra at a construction site near Dallas 17 years ago, he knew the creature was unlike anything in the fossil record. Scientists now know the significance of Turner's fossil as the origin of an extinct line of lizards with an evolutionary twist: a land-dwelling species that became fully aquatic. . Turner took the remains to paleontologis...

Lateral thinking produces first map of gene transmission

A University of Queensland study mapping the evolution of genes has shed light on the role of gene transfer in bacterial diseases. . .. .. The study highlights lateral genetic transfer ?a process where genes are transferred between organisms that ar...

Hepatitis B accounts for 40 percent of 'missing' Asian women

In a groundbreaking, sure-to-be-controversial new study, Emily Oster (a graduate student in economics at Harvard University) argues that excess female mortality, such as infanticide, may not be the only cause of uncommonly high male to female ratios in many Asian countries. It has long been observed that the relative number of males is higher in certain Asian countries than in the West, where it...

Anti-HIV drug has potential to prevent transmission in women

A new study from infectious disease researchers at The Miriam Hospital and Brown Medical School finds that a drug already given orally to treat HIV is also safe when applied as a vaginal microbicide gel. Microbicides are designed to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases and may be formulated as vaginal gels, foams, creams, or suppositories. . "The results...

Avian flu transmission to humans may be higher than thought

A new study suggests that there is an association between direct contact with dead or sick poultry and flu-like illness in humans and that the transmission is probably more common than expected, according to a new study in the January 9 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. . Anna Thorson, M.D., Ph.D., from the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and col...

Ritalin packs punch by elevating norepinephrine, suppressing nerve signal transmissions

Methylphenidate (Ritalin) elevates norepinephrine levels in the brains of rats to help focus attention while suppressing nerve signal transmissions in the sensory pathways to make it easier to block out extraneous stimuli, a Philadelphia research team has found. . Their report in the Journal of Neurophysiology helps explain how a stimulant aids people with attention deficit and hyperactivity diso...

Cell phone emissions excite the brain cortex

Electromagnetic fields from cell phones excite the brain cortex adjacent to it, with potential implications for individuals with epilepsy, or other neurological conditions. This finding is published in Annals of Neurology, a journal by John Wiley & Sons. The article is also available online via Wiley Interscience (www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/ana). . More than 500 million people in the...

Tropical forest CO2 emissions tied to nutrient increases

Extra helpings of key nutrients given to tropical rain forest soils caused them to release substantially more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, a concern to scientists monitoring global change, says a new University of Colorado at Boulder study. . .. The s...

Cultural transmission in bats: When listening for dinner, bats learn from their neighbors

In an exciting study that provides new understanding of how animals learn--and learn from each other--researchers have demonstrated that bats that use frog acoustic cues to find quality prey can rapidly learn these cues by observing other bats. While numerous examples are known of instances where predators can use so-called "social learning" to learn new visual and olfactory cues associated with...

Defense peptide found in primates may block some human HIV transmissions

As primates evolved 7 million years ago, the more advanced species stopped making a protein that University of Central Florida researchers believe can effectively block the HIV-1 virus from entering and infecting blood cells. . .. I...

South Pacific plant may be missing link in evolution of flowering plants

Bottlenose dolphins that reside in designated Special Areas of Conservation throughout the UK, including Dorset, Anglesey and Cornwall, might be at risk from pile driving. The frequency range of pile driving noise could interfere with their ability to communicate, find food and avoid predators. This has the potential to affect their behaviour, health and their ability to breed successfully. Lacta...

Increase in carbon dioxide emissions accelerating

New research shows the rate of increase in carbon dioxide emissions more than doubled since the 1990s. . .. .. He says this indicates that recent ef...

Mars mission Risk 29: Scientists research ways to reduce radiation-induced brain damage

Among the gravest risks of a manned flight to Mars ranks the possibility that massive amounts of solar and cosmic radiation will decimate the brains of astronauts, leaving them in a vegetative state, if they survive at all. . .. Now, medical scientists have been tasked to determine the human brain's maximum safe cosmic radiation dose and to deciphe...

Autoimmune disease triggered if T cells miss a single protein early on

Scientists have discovered that autoimmunity can be triggered in the thymus, where the immune system's T cells develop, if T cells fail to recognize just one of the body's thousands of proteins as "self." The research confirms an emerging view that autoimmunity can start in this cradle of the immune system, and not only at the sites where autoimmune diseases emerge, such as the pancreas in the c...

Does missing gene point to nocturnal existence for early mammals?

A gene that makes cells in the eye receptive to light is missing in humans, researchers have discovered. . .. .. "The classical view of how the eye sees is t...

Transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria linked to previous intensive care unit room occupants

Staying in a room in the intensive care unit (ICU) previously occupied by a patient with treatment-resistant bacteria may increase the odds of acquiring such bacteria, according to a report in the October 9 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. . Two particular microorganisms cause significant illness and death in hospitals: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcu...

Household transmission of SARS: Lessons learned

In the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Toronto, Ontario, about 20% of cases resulted from household transmission (spread of the infection within a household). . .. SARS presented a u...

Opening windows may be the best way of preventing transmission of airborne infection

A study of eight hospitals in Peru has shown that opening windows and doors provided ventilation more than double that of mechanically ventilated negative-pressure rooms and 18 times that of rooms with windows and doors closed. . The researchers, led by Rod Escombe from Imperial College London, compared the airflow in 70 naturally ventilated clinical rooms such as respiratory isolation rooms, TB...

Army research mission focused on autism

"I had a perfectly normal baby. He hit all his developmental landmarks but after his first birthday he seemed to be sick all of the time, with infection after infection. He stopped eating and was no longer happy and playful. By 17 months he had stopped talking, interacting, or even looking at us anymore; he was in his own little world. At four years old, he had no language, was not potty trained,...

Lower carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fueled power plants possible with technology development

A more economical technology for a 90 percent reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fueled power plants is being developed by a chemical engineer and his colleagues at The University of Texas at Austin as part of the TXU Carbon Management Program. . .. “The work we’re d...
Other Tags
(Date:7/24/2014)... wildlife loss leads to conflict among people around the ... Society (WCS) Health & Ecosystems: Analysis of Linkages (HEAL) ... approach to tackle global biodiversity decline. , The harvest ... world,s people and provides protein for more than a ... no surprise that today,s unprecedented loss of wildlife, is ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Bushmeat, the use of native animal species for food ... be a significant factor in the decline of many ... new study indicates that more than half of the ... raptors and hornbills., "By surveying not only the meat ... being eaten inside the forest by hunters and brought ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Angeles, where electric cars ply silent freeways, solar panels ... beneath the earth, from howling winds and from the ... that it is technically and economically feasible to convert ... renewable energy. Published in Energy , the plan ... energy supply in California that could create tens of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):New study draws links between wildlife loss and social conflicts 2Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun 2Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun 3Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun 4
(Date:7/25/2014)... July 25, 2014 DON’T PAUSE is a ... uncomfortable bloating, hot flashes, mood swings, burning tongue menopause ... Dr. Shoreh Ershadi. The AntiAging Institute of California is now ... allows women to try this revolutionary product. For a limited ... get a third bottle at no charge. , ...
(Date:7/25/2014)... 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary changes can dramatically ... a daily basis, according to a new study. ... might help detect and ease flare-ups for people with ... colitis and Crohn,s disease), the researchers said. Trillions ... effect on human health isn,t well understood, the Massachusetts ...
(Date:7/25/2014)... San Francisco, Ca (PRWEB) July 25, 2014 ... in business with their Anniversary Futon Sale. The Futon Shop ... mom and pop shop, which has grown from a few ... States over 33 different kinds of futon mattresses. , ... mouth in the beginning and the desire to sleep on ...
(Date:7/25/2014)... (PRWEB) July 25, 2014 In an election ... it’s no surprise that Americans may not be sleeping well, ... according to a new poll conducted by US-Mattress . ... from across the country, “Which Political Party Do You Side ... that those registered as Independents tout a higher rate of ...
(Date:7/25/2014)... the U.S. are living with a brain tumor, and ... factors, scientists are still searching for answers. , "Right ... and we don,t know why people develop brain tumors," ... Brain Tumor Association. "It,s frustrating for the brain tumor ... funds research to pursue answers to these questions, and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:AntiAging Institute of California Now Offers DON'T PAUSE for Menopause with a Special Promotion 2Health News:Diet Changes Can Alter Gut Bacteria, Study Says 2Health News:Organic Mattress Manufacturer Celebrates 38 Years Of Being In Business 2Health News:Organic Mattress Manufacturer Celebrates 38 Years Of Being In Business 3Health News:New Study Shows the Growing Number of Independent Voters Have a Greater Propensity for Sleeping Well vs. Democrats or Republicans 2Health News:New Study Shows the Growing Number of Independent Voters Have a Greater Propensity for Sleeping Well vs. Democrats or Republicans 3Health News:Brain tumor causes and risk factors elude scientists 2
Other Contents