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DNA Molecules Used To Assemble Nanoparticles

University of Michigan researchers have developed a faster, more efficient way to produce a wide variety of nanoparticle drug delivery systems, using DNA molecules to bind the particles together. .. .. "With this approach, you can target a wide variety of molecules---drugs, contrast agents---to almost any cell," said Dr. James R. Baker Jr., the Ruth Dow Doan Professor of Nanotechnology...

The transparent organism: EMBLEM and Carl Zeiss give labs a unique look at life

A novel high-tech microscope will be brought to the marketplace, giving laboratories everywhere fascinating new insights into living organisms. EMBLEM Technology Transfer GmbH (EMBLEM), the commercial entity of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), announced today that it has signed a licensing deal with technological leader Carl Zeiss to commercialize a new technology called SPIM (Se...

Genetic Variation Visualization - From EMBL

"Because up to 75 percent of breast cancer.patients have an abnormality in a specific cell signaling pathway,.drugs that target different molecules along that pathway may be.especially effective for treating the disease, says a researcher from.The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.". . A clearer picture is now emerging.about the importance of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K...

Self-assembled nano-sized probes allow Penn researchers to see tumors through flesh and skin

Nano-sized particles embedded with bright, light-emitting molecules have enabled researchers to visualize a tumor more than one centimeter below the skin surface using only infrared light. A team of chemists, bioengineers and medical researchers based at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Minnesota has lodged fluorescent materials called porphyrins within the surface of a polyme...

Shutting down the HIV assembly line

After infecting a susceptible cell, the human immunodeficiency virus hijacks that cell's normal machinery to produce carbon copies of itself. New HIV particles roll off the cellular assembly lines, burst like bubbles out of the cell, and float off to invade other cellular factories. Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators have now identified an early step in HIV particle assembly. The...

High fidelity keeps human DNA assembly line humming

Scientists at Michigan State University have made a major discovery on the inner workings of genetic coding, mapping out mechanisms of one of life's most elemental functions: RNA synthesis. Their work has crucial implications for how a normal cell forms a tumor and how a virus runs amok. .. . .. "RNA synthesis is at...

Self-assembled DNA buckyballs for drug delivery

DNA isn't just for storing genetic codes any more. Since DNA can polymerize -- linking many molecules together into larger structures -- scientists have been using it as a nanoscale building material, constructing geometric shapes and even working mechanical devices. . .. The term "buckyballs" has been used up to now for tiny spherical assemblies of carbon atoms known as Buckminsterfullerenes or...

Bumblebees copy one another when contending with unfamiliar flowers

Researchers have reported findings that offer a surprising new twist to our understanding of how bumblebees, a vital floral pollinator, select the flowers from which they collect nectar. When faced with unfamiliar plants, foraging bees do not choose flowers entirely alone but instead copy the choices of other bees. The new findings suggest that bees adjust their behavior when dealing with flowers...

Unexpected lock and key mechanism found for the assembly of tumor blood vessels

A critical lock and key mechanism that allows the final step in the completion of new blood vessel formation has been identified by a University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine team in research that promises to lead to a new way to halt tumor growth by cutting off the tumor blood supply. . The research team led by Judith Varner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Medicine at UCSD an...

The structure of a virus infecting bacteria resembles a human virus

New research has revealed that the structure of a bacteriophage, a virus infecting bacteria, resembles that of certain dangerous viruses that infect people. Studying this bacteriophage reveals various characteristics about viruses and their life cycle without having to study actual human viruses. . Structural biologists Juha Huiskonen and Sarah Butcher from the Academy of Finland Virus Research...

Gambling monkeys give insight into neural machinery of risk

Duke University Medical Center neurobiologists have pinpointed circuitry in the brains of monkeys that assesses the level of risk in a given action. Their findings -- gained from experiments in which they gave the monkeys a chance to gamble to receive juice rewards -- could give insights into why humans compulsively engage in risky behaviors, including gambling, unsafe sex, drug use and overeatin...

MBL researchers probe how an ancient microbe thrives and evolves without sex

A January 2004 finding by biologists at the Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution added important evidence to the radical conclusion that a group of diminutive aquatic animals called bdelloid rotifers have evolved for tens of millions of years without sexual reproduction, in apparent violation of the rule that abandonment of sexual reproduction is a biological...

DNA self-assembly used to mass-produce patterned nanostructures

Duke University scientists have used the self-assembling properties of DNA to mass-produce nanometer-scale structures in the shape of a 4x4 grids, on which patterns of molecules can be specified. They said the achievement represents a step toward mass-producing electronic or optical circuits at a scale 10 times smaller than the smallest circuits now being manufactured. . Instead of using silicon...

MBL leads effort to update E. coli genome

E.coli is one of the most important model organisms for molecular science today and is arguably the single organism about which the most is known. The genes of higher-level plants and animals, even humans, are often understood by their similarity to E. coli genes. As such, the accuracy and completeness of E.coli genome information is of great importance to the scientific community. . In an att...

Bumble bees can estimate time intervals

In a finding that broadens our understanding of time perception in the animal kingdom, researchers have discovered that an insect pollinator, the bumble bee, can estimate the duration of time intervals. Although many insects show daily and annual rhythms of behavior, the more sophisticated ability to estimate the duration of shorter time intervals had previously been known only in humans and othe...

Brain's 'gambling circuitry' identified

From gamblers playing blackjack to investors picking stocks, humans make a wide range of decisions that require gauging risk versus reward. However, laboratory studies have not been able to unequivocally determine how the very basic information-processing "subcortical" regions of the brain function in processing risk and reward. . Now, Steven Quartz and colleagues at the California Institute of...

Dragonfly migration resembles that of birds, scientists say

Scientists have discovered that migrating dragonfliesand songbirds exhibit many of the same behaviors, suggesting the rulesthat govern such long-distance travel may be simpler and more ancientthan was once thought. . .. The team of researchers that made th...

Researchers find that bumblebees' flower choice matters

To predict where a bumblebee will carry its pollen next, you have to literally think like one. . .. Flanigan and her professor, Jeffrey Karron, are studying the behaviors of bees as they gather pollen ?which plant species the bees forage on, which flowers they probe and in what order, and how many blooms they visit before moving on to another...

Nanoparticle assembly enters the fast lane

The speed of nanoparticle assembly can be accelerated with the assistance of the molecule that carries life's genetic instructions, DNA, a team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory recently found. Nanoparticles, particles with dimensions on the order of billionths of a meter, could potentially be used for more efficient energy generation and data storag...

UCLA: How does your brain respond when you think about gambling or taking risks?

Should you leave your comfortable job for one that pays better but is less secure? Should you have a surgery that is likely to extend your life but poses some risk that you will not survive the operation? Should you invest in a risky startup company whose stock may soar even though you could lose your entire investment? In the Jan. 26 issue of the journal Science, UCLA psychologists present the f...

Bumblebee house warming -- it takes a village

All bumblebees always aren't as busy as, well, a bee. It all depends on what their job is. . .. By exposing bumblebee nests to a range of temperatures, the researchers found that th...

New synthetic self-assembling macromolecules mimic nature

We take "self-assembly" for granted when it is carried out by the biopolymers which are our hair, teeth, or skin. But when scientists devise new ways for molecules to self assemble into new materials, it is an important achievement. . ) at Virginia Tech report such a development in the online issue for the Journal of the American Chemical Society, in the article, "Aggregation of Rod-Coil Block Co...

Bacterial walls come tumbling down

The first detailed images of an elusive drug target on the outer wall of bacteria may provide scientists with enough new information to aid design of novel antibiotics. The drugs are much needed to treat deadly infections initiated by Staphylococcus aureus and other bacterial pathogens. . .. Penicillin and many newer antibiotics wor...

Horse genome assembled

The first draft of the horse genome sequence has been deposited in public databases and is freely available for use by biomedical and veterinary researchers around the globe, leaders of the international Horse Genome Sequencing Project announced today. . The $15 million effort to sequence the approximately 2.7 billion DNA base pairs in the genome of the horse (Equus caballus) was funded by the Na...
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(Date:4/18/2014)... world population predicted to reach 9 billion by ... that considers human-altered landscapes such as farmland, according ... habitat that supports it might be an increasingly ... three-quarters of the land surface is directly affected ... human-caused impacts such as climate change. But what ...
(Date:4/18/2014)... adds a twist to the story of how barnyard chickens ... 21 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy ... chickens that lived 200-2300 years ago in Europe, researchers report ... have looked far different from the chickens we know today. ... associate with modern domestic chickens -- such as their yellowish ...
(Date:4/18/2014)... comet impacts can cause widespread ecological havoc, killing off ... But new research from Brown University shows that impacts ... the time of an impact. , A research team ... of leaves and preserved organic compounds lodged inside glass ... material could provide a snapshot of environmental conditions at ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife 2Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife 3Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife 4Ancient DNA offers clues to how barnyard chickens came to be 2Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years 2Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years 3
(Date:4/17/2014)... The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate ... cancer, and this association was found even in ... to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, ... American Association for Cancer Research. , An analysis ... of the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... today in PLOS Pathogens , children who live ... can mount an immune response to infection with malaria ... of high fever and illness and partially control the ... may help researchers develop future interventions that prevent or ... Each year, approximately 200 million cases of malaria occur ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... MD, was recently invited to submit a review ... Microbiology , one of the world,s foremost scientific ... specialist, and chair of the Department of Pediatrics ... analyzed the epidemiology and microbiology of co-infections during ... as more recent 2009 novel H1N1 pandemic. ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson,s disease ... neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed ... way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, ... was published April 16, 2014, in Nature Communications ... idea in Parkinson,s disease; but if true, it could ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Calif.) An international team led by researchers at ... complex, which plays a key role in cell division, ... This is the first time the complex has been ... make cyclin B1/Cdk1 an excellent target to control cellular ... The research was published online today in the journal ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Chronic inflammation may be linked to aggressive prostate cancer 2Health News:Chronic inflammation may be linked to aggressive prostate cancer 3Health News:Study sheds light on how the immune system protects children from malaria 2Health News:Is Parkinson's an autoimmune disease? 2Health News:Dual role: Key cell division proteins also power up mitochondria 2
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