Navigation Links
Women Who Gain Excessive Weight During Pregnancy More Likely to Have Overweight Children

PHILADELPHIA, June 9 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Children of mothers who gain more than the recommended amount of weight during pregnancy are more likely to be overweight at age seven, say researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, in a study published today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Children of mothers who are obese prior to pregnancy and gain excessive weight are at the greatest risk for overweight.

"The earliest determinants of obesity may operate during intrauterine life, and gestational weight gain may influence the environment in the womb in ways that can have long-term consequences on the risk of obesity in children," said study leader Brian Wrotniak, P.T., Ph.D., of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania. "Adherence to pregnancy weight gain recommendations may be a new and effective way to prevent childhood obesity, since currently almost half of U.S. women exceed these recommendations."

The researchers reviewed data from a cohort of 10,226 participants enrolled between 1959 and 1965 in the multicenter National Collaborative Perinatal Project. It was initiated to investigate risk factors for cerebral palsy at 12 U.S. sites. This study looked at the children born at full-term gestation, and researchers evaluated socioeconomic and growth data during gestation, at birth and at age 7. Maternal data were collected at enrollment by using a questionnaire that included maternal pre-pregnancy weight, age and race. Maternal weight and height were measured at the time of delivery to determine gestational weight gain - the difference between the measured weight at delivery and the reported pre-pregnancy weight.

According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), which makes recommendations for weight gain during pregnancy, the amount of weight women should gain during pregnancy depends on the mother's weight status before pregnancy. Women at a healthy pre-pregnancy weight are encouraged to gain 25 to 35 pounds, while women who are overweight should stay between 15 to 25 pounds. Women who are underweight should gain more weight during pregnancy -- between 28 and 40 pounds.

Of the women studied by the researchers, 11 percent gained excessive weight, 24 percent gained adequate weight and 65 percent gained insufficient weight. Today, said the researchers, these proportions would be very different, with almost one in two women gaining more weight than recommended during pregnancy.

The authors say that encouraging pregnant women to adopt healthy eating practices and engage in aerobic physical activity could help them achieve appropriate weight gain and also help prevent obesity in their children. They add that benefits would likewise result from healthy eating and exercise before becoming pregnant, as well as reducing postpartum weight retention before a subsequent pregnancy.

Using the IOM guidelines, children whose mothers exceeded the recommended weight gain were 48 percent more likely to be overweight than children whose mothers stayed within the recommended weight gain. The risk of overweight was similar for children born of women who gained insufficient weight compared with mothers who gained appropriate weight during pregnancy.

The researchers add that more research is necessary to clarify whether the association between greater gestational weight gain and increased odds of overweight in offspring is causal, and whether it exists in today's environment of increasing obesity.

Dr. Wrotniak's coauthors were Justine Shults, Ph.D., of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (CCEB) at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; Samantha Butts, M.D., M.S.C.E., of the Division of Infertility and Reproductive Endocrinology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; and Nicolas Stettler, M.D., M.S.C.E., of Children's Hospital and the Penn CCEB.

About The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country, ranking third in National Institutes of Health funding. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 430-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit

SOURCE The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Copyright©2008 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine technology :

1. Reclast(R) Receives US FDA Approval as First and Only Once-Yearly Treatment for Women With Postmenopausal Osteoporosis
2. Progesterone Therapy and Preterm Birth: More Evidence Helps Identify Women Who Can Benefit
3. QuatRx Completes Patient Enrollment in Phase 3 Study of Ophena(TM) in Women with Postmenopausal Vaginal Syndrome
4. European Experts Recommend Pregnant and Nursing Women Take More DHA - Every Day
5. TAXUS WOMAN Study Reports Positive Clinical Outcomes for the TAXUS(R) Drug-eluting Stent in Women
6. FDA Approves Lillys Osteoporosis Drug EVISTA(R) (raloxifene HCl) to Reduce The Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer in Two Populations of Postmenopausal Women
7. Cell Therapeutics, Inc. (CTI) Sponsors Panel Discussion on Women and Lung Cancer on Capitol Hill
8. Cell Therapeutics, Inc. (CTI) Supports Panel Discussion on Women and Lung Cancer on Capitol Hill
9. Risedronate Reduced Risk of Fracture Among Osteoporotic Postmenopausal Women with History of Hip Fracture
10. New Study Shows Once-Monthly Boniva(R) is as Clinically Effective as Once-Weekly Fosamax(R) at Increasing Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women With Osteoporosis
11. Bay Area Women Sought for Egg Freezing Study
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/26/2015)... 26, 2015 ... of the  "2016 Future Horizons and ... Drug Monitoring (TDM) Market: Supplier Shares, ... Opportunities"  report to their offering.  ... the addition of the  "2016 Future ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... 26, 2015 Research and Markets ( ... "2016 Future Horizons and Growth Strategies in ... Shares, Country Segment Forecasts, Competitive Intelligence, Emerging Opportunities" ... --> --> This new ... Italian therapeutic drug monitoring market, including emerging tests, ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , Nov. 25, 2015 ... addition of the "Global Brain Monitoring ... offering. --> ) has ... Brain Monitoring Devices Market 2015-2019" report ... and Markets ( ) has announced ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
(Date:11/27/2015)... Viejo, CA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... for use in Final Cut Pro X. With ProSidebar: Fasion, video editors can ... or use ProSidebar as a minimalist title opener. Utilize presets featuring self-animating drop ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... , ... November 27, 2015 , ... A simply groundbreaking ... is an interesting show that delves into an array of issues that are presently ... could benefit from open dialogue, this show is changing the subjects consumers focus on, ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... the largest, most successful and prominent nonprofit healthcare organizations in the country. They ... involvement with various organizations, and helped advance the healthcare industry as a whole ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... Patients at Serenity Point Recovery, ... together on Thanksgiving Day to share the things that they are most grateful ... Point YouTube channel, patients displayed what they wrote on index cards, describing the ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... 2015 , ... The Catalent Applied Drug Delivery Institute today ... dose form selection in early phase drug development. The first of these is ... together the UK’s emerging life sciences companies, corporate partners, and investors, at Milton ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):