Navigation Links
'Snapshots' of Eyes Could Serve as Early Warning of Diabetes or Diabetic Eye Disease, U-M Researchers Report
Date:7/14/2008

FA imaging, invented at U-M, measures metabolic stress in retina

ANN ARBOR, Mich., July 14 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new vision screening device, already shown to give an early warning of eye disease, could give doctors and patients a head start on treating diabetes and its vision complications, a new study shows.

The instrument, invented by two scientists at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center, captures images of the eye to detect metabolic stress and tissue damage that occur before the first symptoms of disease are evident.

For people with diabetes -- diagnosed or not -- the new device could offer potentially significant advantages over blood glucose testing, the "gold standard" for diabetes detection.

The device takes a specialized photograph of the eye and is non-invasive, taking about five minutes to test both eyes.

In the July issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, Victor M. Elner, M.D., Ph.D., and Howard R. Petty, Ph.D., report on the potential of the new instrument to screen for diabetes and determine its severity. If further testing confirms the results to date, the new instrument may be useful for screening people who are at risk of diabetes but haven't been diagnosed.

"Our objective in performing this study was to determine whether we could detect abnormal metabolism in the retina of patients who might otherwise remain undiagnosed based on clinical examination alone," says Elner, professor, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at U-M Medical School.

Metabolic stress, and therefore disease, can be detected by measuring the intensity of cellular fluorescence in retinal tissue. In a previous study, Petty and Elner reported that high levels of flavoprotein autofluorescence (FA) act as a reliable indicator of eye disease.

In their new study, Elner and Petty measured the FA levels of 21 individuals who had diabetes and compared the results to age-matched healthy controls. The Kellogg scientists found that FA activity was significantly higher for those with diabetes, regardless of severity, compared to those who did not have the disease. The results were not affected by disease severity or duration and were elevated for diabetics in each age group: 30 to 39 years, 40 to 49 years, and 50 to 59 years.

Given the increasing prevalence of diabetes, the FA device holds the potential to help address a leading and growing public health concern.

Some 24 million Americans have diabetes and an additional 57 million individuals have abnormal blood sugar levels that qualify as pre-diabetes, according to the latest report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, 4.1 million people over the age of 40 suffer from diabetic retinopathy, an eye-related complication of diabetes that is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults.

Twelve individuals in the study were known to have diabetic retinopathy, a disease in which blood vessels in the eye are damaged. The individuals with diabetic retinopathy in at least one eye had significantly greater FA activity than people with diabetes who do not have any visible eye disease.

"The abnormal readings indicated that it may be possible to use this method to monitor the severity of the disease," says Elner.

Petty, a biophysicist and imaging expert, explains that hyperglycemia -- or high blood sugar -- is known to induce cell death in diabetic tissue soon after the onset of disease but before symptoms can be detected clinically.

"Increased FA activity is the earliest indicator that cell death has occurred and tissue is beginning to break down," says Petty, professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, and professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the U-M Medical School. "FA serves as a 'spectral-biomarker' for metabolism gone awry, and we can use the results to detect and monitor disease."

Petty also observes that unlike glucose monitoring, elevation of FA levels reflects ongoing tissue damage. That knowledge, he says, could motivate patients to intensify their efforts to manage the disease.

The Michigan researchers also note that elevated FA does not always mean that an individual has diabetes. "Because of the prevalence of diabetes in our population, individuals with abnormally high FA would be prompted to undergo glucose tolerance testing," says Elner. "If the findings were negative for diabetes, we would look for other causes of ocular tissue dysfunction."

Both Elner and Petty agree that the device has great potential as a tool for diabetes screening and management. "So much damage occurs before the disease can be detected by a doctor," says Elner. "Early diagnosis will allow us to reduce organ damage and prevent many complications that accompany this disease."

Elner and Petty have filed for patents and have formed a company, OcuSciences, Inc., to commercialize the metabolic imaging instrument.

Reference: "Rapid, Non-invasive Detection of Diabetes-induced Retinal Metabolic Stress," Archives of Ophthalmology, July 2008, Vol. 126, No. 7, pp. 934-938.


'/>"/>
SOURCE University of Michigan Health System
Copyright©2008 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine technology :

1. Hope for Progeria - Successfully Validated on Mice, a Treatment Could Soon be Tested on Children
2. Starting Flu Vaccination in August Could Help Protect Nearly 11 Million More Children During Scheduled Doctors Visits
3. Drug Combo Could Lower Diabetes Complications and Costs
4. Most Back Pain Could Be Cured Without Surgery or Drugs if Doctors Treated Muscles - Not the Spine - Says Leading Pain Specialist
5. Molecular Science Could Further Improve Leukemia Survival, Say St. Jude Researchers
6. Recent Data Study Suggests Cortisol Could Help Alleviate Suffering for Those With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia
7. Independent Physician Surveys Show if Approved, MF101 Could Become First-Line Treatment for Menopause Symptoms
8. St. Jude Finds Molecule That Could Improve Cancer Vaccine and Therapy for Other Diseases
9. Mayo Clinic Study Shows Drug Could Effectively Treat, Prevent the Spread of Breast Cancer
10. New Data Show That GlaxoSmithKlines Rotarix(R) Could Be Given With Other Routine Infant Vaccines in the U.S.
11. Feeling Anxious or Distracted? New Research Shows a Cup of Tea Could Help
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/12/2017)... 2017  Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY ... to resolve pending patent litigation in the U.S. District Court ... regarding the Cialis ® (tadalafil) unit dose patent. This ... As part of the agreement, Cialis exclusivity is now expected ... "The unit dose patent for Cialis is valid and ...
(Date:7/11/2017)... 11, 2017  Sysmex America, Inc., a leading ... equipment as well as middleware information systems technology, ... make quality assurance easier and more risk free ... known for the innovation that it delivers to ... quality assurance processes to a new level with ...
(Date:7/10/2017)... GAITHERSBURG, Md. , July 10, 2017 ... in non-animal test methods, is the recipient of a ... by the PETA International Science Consortium. The device, which ... be used to expose human lung cells to airborne ... lung. IIVS will use the VITROCELL® system for testing ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
(Date:7/24/2017)... ... July 24, 2017 , ... The Magic ... “Consumer’s Choice” Award, for favorite sex toy. Created in collaboration with website Kinkly.com, ... to be consumer voted. The Magic Wand Rechargeable won in stiff competition from ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... VA (PRWEB) , ... July 24, 2017 , ... ... Managers, **Presented by FDAnews and MSceppa Consulting **, Aug. 22-23, 2017 – Arlington, ... on Friday, July 28. , Increased FDA scrutiny and growing demands to track ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... ... July 24, 2017 , ... Advanced Dermatology, ... Bellmore, New York, (516) 784-5858. The office opened earlier this summer and is ... Friedman and Fruma Leah Wiederman. , Advanced Dermatology, P.C. founder and medical ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... ... ... “A Short Walk to the Mailbox”: a remarkable memoir of an unconventional courtship. ... Ed Clark is a church music director and choral conductor. He has ... worship leader for over fifty years. He has a master’s degree in church ...
(Date:7/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Three experts will be interviewed on Facebook ... & Exhibition, to be held in Denver, CO on July 30-August 3, 2017. ... visit the AAPM Facebook page to watch three speakers present their information and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):