Navigation Links
Protein Key to Control Growth of Blood Cells

--Findings May Aid in Bone Marrow Transplants, Blood Diseases--

PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- New research sheds light on the biological events by which stem cells in the bone marrow develop into the broad variety of cells that circulate in the blood. The findings may help improve the success of bone marrow transplants and develop better treatments for life-threatening blood diseases.

"As we better understand the biological pathways that regulate the growth of stem cells, we may identify new approaches for treating blood disorders," said study leader Wei Tong, Ph.D., a hematology researcher at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Her study appeared online July 10 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) develop into all types of blood cells: red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and immune cells. HSCs, like other stem cells, have the ability to self-renew: each can give rise to more mature, developed cells with more specific functions, as well as a new stem cell. (Everyone carries HSCs in their bone marrow, unlike embryonic stem cells, which exist only in embryos.)

In her study, conducted in mice, Tong focused on a protein called Lnk that helps control HSC expansion. When a growth factor in the blood called thrombopoietin (TPO) acts on its cell receptor, it triggers signals along a pathway that includes another protein, JAK2. JAK2, in turn, causes stem cells to increase their numbers.

Tong's group and others previously found that Lnk is a negative regulator for HSCs, acting as a brake on stem cell expansion. In the current study, they found that mice genetically engineered to lack the Lnk protein had 10 times the normal amount of HSCs in their bone marrow. Without Lnk to directly interact with JAK2 and inhibit its activity, TPO made stem cell production go into overdrive.

However, there was an unexpected potential benefit -- the expanded population of stem cells had a higher proportion of quiescent cells, those in a resting stage in the cell cycle. Quiescent stem cells, said Tong, are more likely to succeed in a recipient when they are used in bone marrow transplantation.

Although much research remains to be done, added Tong, other researchers might build on this knowledge to manipulate HSCs for more effective bone marrow transplants for cancer patients after high dose chemotherapy or radiotherapy and treatments for particular blood disorders. Aplastic anemia, severe combined immunodeficiency and hemoglobin disorders, for example, involve deficiencies of specific immune cells in the blood. Using a drug to inhibit Lnk could potentially produce larger numbers of HSCs for a successful bone marrow transplant.

Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), on the other hand, entail the opposite danger -- a sometimes-fatal overproduction of certain bone marrow cells. Clinicians might use Tong's research on Lnk and its associated signaling pathway to curtail stem cell production and control MPDs.

The National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, supported Tong's research, with additional grant funding from the McCabe Foundation and CHOP Institutional Development Fund. Tong's co-authors were Alexey Bersenev, Chao Wu, and Joanna Balcerek, all of the Division of Hematology at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

About The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country, ranking third in National Institutes of Health funding. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 430-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit

Contact: Ashley Moore

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Phone: (267) 426-6071

SOURCE The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Copyright©2008 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine technology :

1. Adlyfe Study on the Detection of Misfolded Proteins Published in the Journal Transfusion
2. CEL-SCI Presents Data for CEL-1000 as a Vaccine Adjuvant with Recombinant Hepatitis B Virus Protein
3. Study Published in Endocrinology Reports Potential of Modigene Technology to Extend Duration of Protein Drugs
4. Study Suggests Soy Protein May Reduce Prostate Cancer Risk
5. Vical Demonstrates Dose-sparing of Protein-based H5N1 Influenza Vaccine With Vaxfectin(TM) Adjuvant
6. Exelixis Reports Top-Line Results of the Phase 2 Trial of XL784 in Patients With Proteinuria Associated With Diabetic Nephropathy
7. First High-Res 3-D Structures of Mammalian HSP90 Protein Solved, Key to Better Targets for AIDS, Sepsis, Cancer Drugs
8. The New England Journal of Medicine Publishes First Clinical Results for MedImmunes Chitinase-like Protein YKL-40 in Patients With Asthma
9. VioQuest Pharmaceuticals Announces Dosing of First Patient in Phase IIa Solid Tumor Study for Lenocta(TM), a Novel Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitor
10. Neptune Industries Reports Favorable Phase II Trial Results on Ento- Protein(TM)
11. Fundamental Applied Biology, Inc. Is Awarded SBIR Phase IIB Grant for the Commercialization of Protein Therapeutics Using Cell Free Technology
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/29/2015)... 29, 2015  The GE Health Cloud 1 was ... of North America (RSNA) meeting in ... industry, the new cloud ecosystem and its applications will connect ... pathways and multidisciplinary teams – both inside and outside the ... CEO of GE. "As the digital industrial leader, we are ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... Une nouvelle approche consistant ... contre le cancer avancé.    --> ... au traitement photodynamique au Bremachlorin contre le cancer ... nouvelle approche consistant à combiner l,immunothérapie au traitement ...    Clinical Cancer Research . ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... -- Lannett Company, Inc. (NYSE: LCI ) today ... Kremers Urban Pharmaceuticals Inc. (KU), the U.S. specialty ... S.A. (Euronext: UCB). --> ... UCB for total consideration of approximately US$1.23 billion, ... capital adjustment, a deduction of certain reimbursable amounts ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
(Date:11/27/2015)... Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... new study carried out by the University of Toronto and the University of British ... number of hospitalizations for head injuries. The article explains that part of the reason ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... The ... in America. As people age, more care is needed, especially with Alzheimer’s, dementia ... medical professionals are being overworked. The forgotten part of this equation: 80 percent ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 27, 2015 , ... An inventor, from Hopkinsville, Ky., thought ... at home, so he invented the patent-pending ELECTRONIC M.D. , The ELECTRONIC M.D. ... doing so, it could help to prevent potential overdose situations. As a result, ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... Orange County, CA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... holiday season , The company is offering customers 10% off of their purchase of ... purchase any treatment at full price. According to a company spokesperson. “Finding lice is ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 27, 2015 , ... ProSidebar: Fashion is a set of 30 ... ProSidebar: Fasion, video editors can easily add an informative sidebar to any FCPX production. ... Utilize presets featuring self-animating drop zones, lines, bars, and text with the ease of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):