Navigation Links
New Study Reports That Physical Therapy Treatment Resolves Symptoms of Urinary Incontinence in Women
Date:3/19/2008

Silent Health Issue Affects Women of All Ages

ALEXANDRIA, Va., March 19 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine (March 18, 2008) reports that pelvic floor muscle training, in conjunction with bladder training, resolved the symptoms of urinary incontinence in women. According to the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), proper preventive measures and treatment by a physical therapist can help patients manage, if not alleviate, this often debilitating condition.

The study, which included 96 randomized controlled trials and 3 systematic reviews from 1990 through 2007, concluded that pelvic floor muscles training and bladder training resolved urinary incontinence in women, as compared to drug therapy, electrostimulation, medical devices, injectable bulking agents, and local estrogen therapy.

"This study is significant for many reasons, none more so than because it provides the highest levels of evidence to support the importance of intervention by a physical therapist who specializes in treating urinary incontinence," says Cynthia E Neville, PT, BCIA-PMDB, director of Women's Health Rehabilitation at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago.

Urinary incontinence, or involuntary loss of bladder control, isn't something that just happens to older patients. In fact, the condition affects men and women alike, young and old. More than 25 million* Americans have urinary incontinence, and the experience can leave them feeling ashamed, socially isolated, and depressed.

Patricia J Jenkyns, a physical therapist at the Department of Rehabilitation Services at Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital, says that physical therapists are crucial in treating urinary incontinence because of their role in both assessing and treating musculoskeletal conditions. "Patients often think that because of age or medical history, incontinence is something they have to learn to live with, but in reality that couldn't be further from the truth," she says. "Health care professionals need to be aware of the role that physical therapists play in treating incontinence so that their patients know about alternatives to diapers, medication, or surgery."

Jenkyns notes that physical therapists use a variety of methods to help patients correct pelvic floor dysfunction. The initial patient evaluation requires determining the type of incontinence (stress, urge, or both), the extent of incontinence, assessing the strength, motor control and endurance of pelvic floor muscles, and screening for any other musculoskeletal issues, then developing an individualized exercise treatment program, and making sure patients understand their role in the treatment program.

In a case study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (March 6, 2008) regarding urinary incontinence in women, it is noted that "first-line treatment for stress incontinence includes pelvic floor muscle training." Affirming the Annals of Internal Medicine results, this second study points out that women unable to identify their pelvic floor muscles "may benefit from seeing a physical therapist trained in pelvic floor therapy."

Kegel exercises, or pelvic floor muscle exercises that involve contracting, holding, and releasing pelvic floor muscles, are the most effective weapon in the fight against stress incontinence. "Once patients have correctly identified these muscles, a physical therapist will train how to enhance pelvic floor muscle function, coordinate with abdominal muscle exercises and bring these exercises and awareness into functional activities," says Jenkyns. She notes that these exercises need to be brought into daily activities, and can be done when sitting at your desk or on the toilet, while driving, or at the gym. For those with very weak muscles, she recommends starting the exercises while lying down.

Jenkyns always reminds her patients who experience stress incontinence to "squeeze as you sneeze," or to coordinate pelvic floor and abdominal muscles before doing the activity that causes leakage, (eg, sneezing, coughing, laughing, lifting, etc). Physical therapists can also offer tips on lifestyle changes that will help make the bladder less irritable: avoiding common bladder irritants, retraining the bladder, keeping a bladder diary and lifting, moving, and exercising correctly, particularly by avoiding improper sit-up techniques.

Since 2006, the APTA Section on Women's Health has offered members a Certificate of Achievement in Pelvic Physical Therapy. Known as CAPP, the program provides standardized training for this highly specialized field and currently has 400 members in the certification process.

APTA offers a free brochure to help consumers understand what incontinence is and the different kinds of treatment options physical therapists can provide to manage the condition, or in some cases, regain complete continence. It can be found on the APTA Web site at http://www.apta.org/consumer.

Physical therapists are health care professionals who diagnose and manage individuals of all ages who have musculoskeletal problems or other health-related conditions that limit their abilities to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives. Physical therapists examine each individual and develop a plan of care using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. Physical therapists also work with individuals to prevent the loss of mobility by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles.

The American Physical Therapy Association (http://www.apta.org) is a national organization representing physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and students nationwide. Its goal is to foster advancements in physical therapist education, practice, and research. Consumers can access "Find a PT" to find a physical therapist in their area, as well as physical therapy news and information at http://www.apta.org/consumer.

* National Association for Continence (NAFC)


'/>"/>
SOURCE American Physical Therapy Association
Copyright©2008 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine technology :

1. Dendreon Announces Publication of Phase 1 Study Highlighting Immunologic and Clinical Activity of Lapuleucel-T (Neuvenge(R)) in Advanced Breast Cancer Patients
2. EDAP Announces Launch of Clinical Study Combining HIFU and Chemotherapy for Localized Aggressive High Risk Prostate Cancer
3. Cephalon Announces Positive Results from a Pivotal Study of FENTORA in Opioid-tolerant Patients with Non-cancer Breakthrough Pain
4. Allos Therapeutics Initiates Study of PDX in Patients with Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma
5. Multiple Myeloma Research Consortium (MMRC) Partners with Novartis to Advance Phase II Study of Deacetylase Inhibitor
6. Potential Safety Issue Identified in Ongoing Phase 2 Clinical Study of HCV-796
7. Study Suggests High-Dose Fish Oil May Significantly Improve Behavior in Children with ADHD
8. MicroDose Announces Positive Results From the QDose Inhaled Insulin Glucose Clamp Study
9. Video: Landmark Study in The Lancet: Patients Treated With Betaseron(R) After First MS Attack Experienced Significant Delay in MS Progression
10. MacroGenics Begins Global Phase 2/3 Protege Study in Recent-onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
11. Sarasotas Roskamp Institute Releases Study Defining a Mechanism for Development of Obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome, Forerunners of Type 2 Diabetes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/7/2017)... 7, 2017  Novavax, Inc., (Nasdaq: NVAX ) ... 2 trials of its RSV F protein recombinant nanoparticle vaccine ... have been published in the journal Vaccine ... in prior scientific conferences). The Company previously announced top ... is developing the RSV F Vaccine with the goal of ...
(Date:6/2/2017)... , June 2, 2017  NxStage Medical, Inc. (Nasdaq:  NXTM), a ... today announced new findings demonstrating positive biochemical outcomes related ... System One™. The data will be presented at the ... Madrid, Spain . The ... Home Dialysis Network in Europe ...
(Date:5/29/2017)... -- Cellect Biotechnology Ltd. (NASDAQ: APOP ; TASE: APOP), ... selection of stem cells, today provided a corporate update ... March 31 st , 2017. "We ... quarter of 2017," said Dr. Shai Yarkoni, Chief Executive ... of the first blood cancer patient in the recently ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
(Date:6/25/2017)... ... ... Month and the focus is on prostate cancer. Second only to skin cancer, prostate ... common cause of cancer related death today; lung cancer remains in the number one spot. ... during his lifetime. Those at highest risk are men who have a family ...
(Date:6/24/2017)... ... ... Doorknobs are for convenience, deadbolts are for security. , There are many ... an alarm system installed. But unless there is a working deadbolt lock that is ... Premier Locksmith in Killeen, TX says: “In the majority of home burglaries, intruders use ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 24, 2017 , ... Studies show evidence that carotenoids and antioxidants derived ... loss in these patients. , But how often do ophthalmologists and optometrists in Sweden ... at risk of or with early symptoms of AMD? A study published recently ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... ... Goodcents Deli Fresh Subs today announced the opening of a new restaurant ... Topeka, Kan. 66604 (near 21st and Gage). It is owned and operated by long-time ... in the Topeka and Bonner Springs, Kan. area. , “Goodcents has such a ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... MD Now Urgent ... is MD Now’s 28th facility overall and marks the urgent care center's eighth location ... mile North of The Falls shopping mall. The new clinic offers a wide array ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):