Navigation Links
Who Gets Heart Failure? Race Takes Back Seat to Diabetes and High Blood Pressure

Diabetes and high blood pressure, two conditions rooted in genetics and environmental surroundings, play a much greater role than race alone in determining// who is mostly likely to develop heart failure, according to the latest study from cardiologists at Johns Hopkins. Each year, nearly 300,000 Americans die from heart failure.

Experts say that racial disparities have long been known to exist in who actually develops risk factors for the condition, with African Americans nearly twice as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes and more than a third as likely to have high blood pressure than Caucasian Americans. But researchers have only now determined the precise role played by race in comparison to other risk factors, including socio-economic factors, age, gender, smoking, family history, and other health problems, as well as diabetes and hypertension.

The Hopkins team will present its findings March 27 in New Orleans at the American College of Cardiology’s annual Scientific Sessions in New Orleans.

In the study, researchers monitored nearly 7,000 men and women, age 45 to 84, of different ethnic backgrounds and with no existing symptoms of heart disease. African Americans developed heart failure at significantly higher rates (4.6 cases per 1,000 per year) than all other races, including Hispanics and Caucasians. Their rate was almost five times that of Chinese Americans (1 case per 1,000 per year) and almost twice that of Caucasians (2.4 cases per 1,000 per year).

However, these apparent risk differences among races almost disappeared (dropping from twice as likely, a significant difference, to no more than one-and-a-half times as likely, an insignificant difference) when researchers used statistical techniques to exclude the two traditional risk factors for heart disease.

'When all major factors are taken into account, the differences between races for heart failure largely evaporate in the absence of diabetes and hypertension among African Americans,' says senior study investigator Jo?o Lima, M.D.

According to Lima, an associate professor of medicine and radiology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and its Heart Institute, these early results add to other interesting findings from the so-called Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

The study, started in 2001, is monitoring its ethnically diverse participants for six to eight years to see who develops heart failure and who does not. It is the first large-scale analysis of racial or ethnic differences in heart function. So far, 79 study participants have developed congestive heart failure.

Other results presented at the meeting showed differences among races in heart strain, or contraction, which may contribute to disparities in heart failure, albeit to a lesser extent. Indeed, African American hearts were found to contract less strongly than those of Hispanic, Caucasian or Chinese American backgrounds.

Lima cautions, however, that much remains to be understood about the root causes of racial disparities and how to fix them.

He points out that while African Americans are at much higher risk of heart failure, there is no similarly higher number for risk of suffering heart attack, which, like diabetes and hypertension, often leads to heart failure.

In MESA, researchers found a reverse relationship, with African Americans having the lowest rates of heart failure due to myocardial infarct (at 25 percent), while other races had a much higher proportion: Caucasians (40 percent), Hispanics (42 percent), and Chinese Americans (100 percent.)

Lima says the difference could be due to successful disease prevention efforts among all racial groups, except for African Americans, at controlling hypertension.

'A lot of public health attention has already been paid to getting high blood pressure under control, s o it may be just that this risk factor is under tighter control in some ethnic groups than in others,' he says. 'African Americans are clearly getting heart failure from causes other than heart attack.'

According to lead researcher Hossein Bahrami, M.D., M.P.H., the message to physicians is clear, 'warding off heart failure in African Americans requires aggressive treatment of diabetes and hypertension. Whether through increased screening or greater emphasis on drug therapies, these are two risk factors that must be brought under control.'

Bahrami, a senior cardiology research fellow at Hopkins, says removing barriers for African Americans to controlling their diabetes and hypertension could be critical to reducing new cases of heart failure. Across all ethnic groups, an estimated 550,000 Americans are diagnosed each year.

Bahrami says the team’s next steps are to determine why different rates exist for these risk factors and the role played by biological and environmental factors.


Related medicine news :

1. One in Three Heart Attack Patients Have No Chest Pains
2. Epileptic Seizures Can Be Due to Heart Problem
3. Bypass Heart Surgery Performed Without General Anesthesia
4. New CPR Guidelines issued by Heart Association
5. White Cells Count Can Predict Heart Attack Death Risk
6. Vitamins-The answer to Heart Disease?
7. Fight Heart disease and Pain with Meditation
8. Heart disease in the newborn is related to maternal malnutrition
9. New drug to treat Heart Attack and damaged tissue
10. Heart disease threat starts early in life for Diabetics
11. Mechanical Heart
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... Dehydration, defined as a loss of body water ... the hot sun, and heat stroke and death will quickly follow. A normal human ... Kleyne. Every cell, system and structure requires water to function properly. Kleyne, who believes ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... the only authorized OSHA Training Institute Education Center in Northern California, is calling ... holiday season’s major sales events. As the volume of sales and shoppers ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Add a fresh touch to this year’s holiday festivities with ... bring long-lasting style and cheer to any space. , Holiday plants are more than ... on giving all year long. , “Holiday plants make a room come alive,” says ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... Take the audience on a journey with TransFrame Cloud ... through a cloud of images without ever setting a single keyframe in Final Cut Pro ... Then use the controls to change the angle and depth of field to create a ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... The national nonprofit, United Breast ... scheduled for released during the Green Bay Packers vs the Chicago Bears Thanksgiving ... UBCF is honored to be a part of this event, increasing awareness of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... iRhythm Technologies, Inc. , a leading digital health care solutions ... participate in the 27th Annual Piper Jaffray Healthcare Conference at The ... . Kevin King , Chief Executive Officer of iRhythm, ... ET. --> --> About ... . --> iRhythm is a privately held digital ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015 Teledyne DALSA ... X-Ray image sensing technology, will introduce its CMOS X-Ray ... Exhibition , November 29 to December 3, at McCormick Place ... dynamic detectors for diagnostic and interventional imaging will be on ... Xineos family of advanced CMOS X-Ray detectors is the ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... The uptake of recently approved and pipeline premium products for Type 1 ... 2021, says GBI Research . --> ... Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM), will be a key driver of market growth to ... The uptake of recently approved and pipeline premium products for Type ... to 2021, says GBI Research . ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: