Navigation Links
Timing of Food Consumption Activates Genes in Specific Brain Area

Giving up your regular late-night snack may be hard, and not just because it’s a routine. The habit may genetically change an area of the brain to expect the food// at that time, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have discovered.

By training mice to eat at a time when they normally wouldn’t, the researchers found that food turns on body-clock genes in a particular area of the brain. Even when the food stopped coming, the genes continued to activate at the expected mealtime.

“This might be an entrance to the whole mysterious arena of how metabolic conditions in an animal can synchronize themselves with a body clock,” said Dr. Masashi Yanagisawa, professor of molecular genetics and senior author of the study.

The UT Southwestern researchers report their findings in the Aug. 8 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The daily ups-and-downs of waking, eating and other bodily processes are known as circadian rhythms, which are regulated by many internal and external forces. One class of genes involved in these cycles is known as Period or Per genes.

When food is freely available, the strongest controlling force is light, which sets a body’s sleep/wake cycle, among other functions. Light acts on an area in the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus, or SCN.

But because destroying the SCN doesn’t affect the body clock that paces feeding behavior, the circadian pacemaker for feeding must be somewhere else, Dr. Yanagisawa said.

To find the answer, his group did a simple but labor-intensive experiment. The scientists set the mice on a regular feeding schedule, then examined their brain tissue to find where Per genes were turned on in sync with feeding times.

The researchers put the mice on a 12-hour light/dark cycle, and provided food for four hours in the middle of the light portion.

Because mice normally feed at night, this pattern is similar to humans eating at inappropriate times. Dysfunctional eating patterns play a role in human obesity, particularly in the nocturnal eating often seen in obese people, the researchers note.

The mice soon fell into a pattern of searching for food two hours before each feeding time. They also flipped their normal day/night behavior, ignoring the natural cue that day is their usual time to sleep.

After several days, the researchers found that the daily activation cycle of Per genes in the SCN was not affected by the abnormal feeding pattern.

However, in a few different areas of the brain, particularly a center called the dorsomedial hypothamalic nucleus or DMH, the Per genes turned on strongly in sync with feeding time after seven days.

When the mice subsequently went two days without food, the genes continued to turn on in sync with the expected feeding time.

“They started to show the same pattern of anticipatory behaviors several hours before the previously scheduled time of feeding,” said Dr. Yanagisawa, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. “So somewhere in the body, they clearly remembered this time of day.”

Source Newswise

Related medicine news :

1. Optimum Timing for HIV/AIDS Prognosis
2. Timing Of Womens Labor May Determine Effectiveness Of Pain Medication
3. Drink till you drop dead in English Pubs- Restriction on Timings Lifted
4. Minimally Invasive Lung Cancer Surgery Minimize the Treatment Timings
5. Study on Timing of Spinal Surgery
6. Breast Cancer Risk Influenced by the Timing of Weight Gain
7. Timing of First Intercourse is Vital
8. Timing – Crucial for Asthma Drugs to Wor
9. Legume Consumption Can Cut Heart Disease Risk
10. Link Between Alcohol Consumption And Cardiovascular Disease
11. Alcohol Consumption During Pregnancy Not Safe
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Avid collector, Andrew Hawley ... Michigan boxing style concert posters. This is one of Joplin's most famous and beautiful ... at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The According to Hawley, "It is ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... Patients at ... Michigan, have come together on Thanksgiving Day to share the things that they ... on the Serenity Point YouTube channel, patients displayed what they wrote on index ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... eReferral system for diagnostic imaging in the Waterloo region. Using the Ocean Platform, ... Medicine tests directly from their electronic medical record (EMR) without the need for ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... The Catalent ... and the need to integrate dose form selection in early phase drug development. ... membership organization supporting and bringing together the UK’s emerging life sciences companies, corporate ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , ... November 26, 2015 , ... PRMA Plastic Surgery ... 19, 2015, our surgeons performed their 6,000th free flap breast reconstruction surgery! , “What ... up every day excited to rebuild lives and it’s an honor to have served ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... November 26, 2015 ... the "Radioimmunoassay Market by Type (Reagents ... Industry, Academics, Clinical Diagnostic Labs), Application (Research, ... to 2020" report to their offering. ... the addition of the "Radioimmunoassay Market ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... Nov. 25, 2015  Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN ) ... (BLA) with the United States ... a biosimilar candidate to Humira ® (adalimumab). Amgen ... submitted to the FDA and represents Amgen,s first BLA ... E. Harper , M.D., executive vice president of Research ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , Nov. 25, 2015 On Tuesday, ... federal bellwether trial against Wright Medical Technology, Inc. ... their Conserve metal-on-metal hip implant device, awarded $11 ... a two week trial and three days of ... hip device was defectively designed and unreasonably dangerous, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: