Navigation Links
Supporting children with stress key to improve stuttering

Researchers are studying ways to help children who stutter, cope with their stressors and emotions as this has a bearing on how the child improves with the speech difficulty //.

"Our findings indicate that young children who stutter are more apt to be emotionally aroused, less able to settle down once aroused and less able to control their attention and emotion during everyday stressful or challenging situations," Vanderbilt University psychologist Tedra Walden, a co-author of the research, said.

"Stuttering, as it continues, can impact a child's academic, emotional, social and vocational potential and development. Therefore, if we know more about how emotions influence stuttering and then use this information to more effectively treat early childhood stuttering, we should be in a better position to decrease the long-term negative effects of stuttering in children as they get older," she continued.

"We have long thought emotional development influenced childhood stuttering; however, until such findings as ours, we've lacked data to support such beliefs," Edward G. Conture, a co-author of the research and director of graduate studies in the Vanderbilt Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, said. "These new findings tell us that when parents tell clinicians, for example, that excitement increases their child's stuttering, clinicians should try to see how and when certain emotional states increase or maintain the child's stuttering. Clinicians need to pay more attention to what parents observe about what impacts their child's stuttering."

In addition to Walden and Conture, the research team included Vanderbilt researchers Jan Karrass, first author of the research, Corrin Graham, Hayley Arnold, Kia Hartfield and Krista Schwenk. The research is in press at the Journal of Communication Disorders and is available online now at

The researchers were interested in understanding the relationship between how children who stutter are affected by and handle emotional stimulation, as well as their ability to control their attention during everyday situations.

To examine this relationship, the researchers used a standardized test of emotions, surveying the parents of 65 3- to 5-year-old children who stutter and 56 children of the same age who do not. The parents filled out a 100-question survey designed to determine how the children react to emotional events and how well they are able to control these emotions. The children participated in two laboratory tests to gauge their language use and speech abilities to ensure that the only speech-language difference between children who do and do not stutter, at least for this study, was restricted to stuttering.

The researchers found three primary differences between young children who stutter and those who do not. The children who stutter were more emotionally aroused by everyday stressful or challenging situations than their non-stuttering peers. It took these children a longer time to settle back down once they had become aroused. And, the children who stuttered were less able to control their attention and were more likely to become fixated on a distraction than the children who do not stutter.

The authors also found that the degree to which children who stutter are able to regulate their emotions, combined with how strongly they react to upsetting or exciting situations, played a role in the frequency, duration and severity of instances of stuttering.

"We have here something of a 'chicken or egg' question, that is, is there a causal relationship between their emotional, behavioral and attention issues and stuttering, or are those two situations just happening at the same time?" Walden said. "Our findings seem to indicate that kids with behavioral and emotional issues are at greater risk of stuttering, that not all aspects of the ir emotional reactions can be blamed on stuttering, and some of these reactions may pre-date the onset of stuttering and actually contribute to its onset and development."

"Parents of children known or suspected to be stuttering should not read these findings to suggest that they raise their children in a hermetically sealed jar. Their children should be allowed the full range of emotions and experiences of any other typically developing child," Conture said. "However, if the child consistently and routinely reacts to things such as everyday changes in activities or routine to a greater degree and longer than expected – especially if such reactions seem more usual than unusual and appear related to changes in the child's stuttering – the parent should consider discussing this with a health professional, preferably someone with experience assessing and treating childhood stuttering."


Related medicine news :

1. Cancer Cells Trigger Supporting Cells to Turn Cancerous
2. Starvation in pregnant women can cause heart disease to their children
3. Fireworks can spell death for asthmatic children
4. Cut down TV and video games and you have less aggressive children.
5. Half of worlds children are passive smokers - damning disclosure from WHO
6. Antibiotic induces liver damage in children with E.COLI infections.
7. Analgesic abuse - cause for chronic headache in children
8. Cats to protect children from asthma
9. Maternal alcohol consumption linked to behavioral problems in children
10. Overweight children Dont Necessarily Become overweight adults
11. Higher Risk of Asthma in children with autoimmune disease
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Finnleo, a leader in the traditional ... models of traditional and far-infrared saunas. , For traditional saunas, Finnleo is ... traditional Finnish sauna wood, and Finnleo uses only European Grade A Nordic White Spruce ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 26, 2015 , ... Ministers, senior government and UN agencies, ... Centres of Excellence, and public R&D institutions, civil societies and other partners gathered ... 5th African Network for Drugs and Diagnostics Innovation, ANDI, Stakeholders Meeting. The three- ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Lakeview Health, a Jacksonville-based drug ... their sobriety and show through pictures what a positive difference it makes. The ... with the hashtag #FacesOfGratitude on their Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts. Short ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... The McHenry County law firm of ... decision obtained by Attorneys Francisco J. Botto and Alex C. Wimmer. Attorneys Botto and ... Comm’n, 2015 IL App (2d) 130884WC. , According to court documents, Adcock testified that ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... Beddit® has ... Beddit Classic sleep tracking systems. The new app features a more intuitive SleepScore™ that ... understand how well you slept. The SleepScore is created by a proprietary algorithm. Beddit ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... 25, 2015 Allergan plc (NYSE: ... Rugen Therapeutics, a start-up  biotechnology company focused on ... disorders and funded by the F-Prime Biomedical Research ... into an exclusive collaboration to support the discovery ... Disorders (ASD) and Obsessive Compulsive disorders (OCD). ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015 USP 800 applies to all ... pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, nurses, physicians, physician assistants, home ... also covers all entities which store, prepare, transport, ... healthcare institutions, patient treatment clinics, physicians, practice facilities, ... --> What is the purpose of ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015 Asia -based ... BioLight and the New Investors will make a direct ... a private placement. The financing will help IOPtima to ... used in the treatment of glaucoma, as well as ... IOPtimate™ system with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: