Navigation Links
Study to Explore Using Magnets to Correct 'sunken Chest'

Researchers at UCSF Children's Hospital in San Francisco have launched a groundbreaking study to determine whether a new procedure// using magnets can correct sunken chest, the most common congenital chest deformity, in the same way that orthodontic braces gradually realign teeth.

Sunken chest, which is known medically as pectus excavatum, is a deformity of the cartilage that connects the ribs to the breastbone. The deformed cartilage pulls the breastbone inward, making the chest look caved in or sunken. The condition occurs in about one in 800 children born in the United States each year and is three times more common in boys than girls.

A UCSF team developed the new procedure, in which a magnet attached to the child's breastbone is coupled with a second one outside the chest that creates a steady, controlled, outward pull on the internal magnet to reshape the bone, cartilage and chest wall.

The procedure marks one of the first times magnets have been embedded inside the body to treat a health condition, according to Michael Harrison, MD, professor of surgery and pediatrics emeritus at UCSF and lead investigator of the study.

"We needed to apply a force to gradually remodel the chest wall without piercing the skin," Harrison said. "Magnets do it."

The research team named the new technique the "Magnetic Mini-Mover Procedure," known as 3MP. The 3MP uses a device that includes two parts: a titanium-encased magnet about the size of a quarter that is surgically attached to the child's breastbone and a second magnet embedded in a lightweight plastic brace that the child wears under clothing. The attraction between the two magnets holds the brace in place.

Because the internal magnet is placed just under the skin during an outpatient visit, the child can go home on the day of the procedure with relatively little discomfort. The child wears the brace for three to 12 months, depending on the severity of the deformity. It can be adjusted to increase or decrease the pull on the breastbone in the same way that orthodontic braces are loosened or tightened.

If successful, the 3MP could revolutionize treatment of pectus excavatum, according to Harrison. Current approaches to correcting sunken chest involve major surgery to open and rebuild the chest and the insertion of metal struts to hold the chest in place while it heals. Complications can occur because the struts are under significant pressure, and the painful recovery can take months.

"The problem with present techniques is that they attempt to reshape the chest wall in one big operation," Harrison said. "A better idea is to apply a little force over a longer time, like the orthodontist moves your teeth."

The use of the magnets has been deemed safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which has reviewed and approved the 3MP device. The internal magnet is laser-welded in a titanium case, assuring its safety. The magnets have been found to have no effect on the heart or other body parts, and studies have demonstrated that long-term exposure to magnetic fields is not harmful.

Sunken chest had long been considered a cosmetic defect. But recent studies have determined that while not life-threatening, in severe cases the deformity can cause heart and breathing difficulties, because the abnormal breast bone can reduce blood flow to the heart and prevent the lungs from expanding completely, restricting the ability to exercise, according to Harrison. Some patients also suffer serious emotional difficulties and low self-esteem, especially since sunken chest often worsens during adolescence when children are self-conscious about their appearance and seek peer acceptance.

"This is not a trivial problem for these kids," Harrison said. "Most are willing to undergo a big, painful and expensive surgery to fix it. Why not a simple little outpatient procedure to fix it?"

Researchers are seeking potential study participants who have sunken chest and are between 8 and 14 years of age, otherwise healthy and willing to participate in the 12-month-long study of the new procedure.

Source-Bio-Bio Technology
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Tomato Sauce reduces Cancer Risk- Study
2. Study on obesity and heart failure
3. National Lung Study in the process
4. Study casts doubt on keyboard ills
5. Study reveals how stress can make you sick
6. Study reveals how stress can make you sick
7. Study supports vegetable diet
8. Study to look at early surgery to treat epilepsy
9. Its Never Too Late to Stop Smoking,Study Finds
10. New Technique to Study Infants Brain.
11. Groundbreaking Study Gives Hope For Patients With Kidney Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... A new analysis of ... the healthiest seniors are located in the Midwest. With the average cost of healthcare ... people are concerned with both the quality and affordability of where they live. An ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... ... copper, antimicrobial, mesh back 24/7 task chair specifically designed for clinical areas. Genie ... are thrilled to partner with Cupron® to provide customers with a game changing ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... , ... May 26, 2017 , ... After raising nearly ... Top gadget will continue to be available at a discounted crowdfunding price on ... stress wherever they are, I also wanted to bring a fidget toy to the ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... 26, 2017 , ... Silver Birch of Hammond, a new assisted lifestyle community, ... four acres of land at 5620 Sohl Avenue in Hammond, serves older adults who ... 125 studio and one-bedroom apartments. Each of the private apartments at Silver Birch features ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... Dr. Alex Rabinovich, a highly-skilled oral surgeon specializing ... blog post on insurance options. If a Bay Area patient has to search for ... and money. Visiting an in-network provider for a second opinion can ensure a patient ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/4/2017)... May 4, 2017  A new tight-tolerance microextrusion ... other highly-engineered materials, is being launched by Natvar, ... been developed in recent years to service a ... surgical applications. More expensive materials such as glass ... tubing due to their ability to consistently hold ...
(Date:5/3/2017)... 3, 2017 A Catheterization Laboratory is ... healthcare facility. Commonly referred to as cath lab, ... diagnostic imaging technology to give physicians visual access ... these spaces, a team of physicians perform life-saving ... coronary intervention, congenital heart defect closure, stenotic heart ...
(Date:5/3/2017)... , May 3, 2017  Getinge, a leading ... to quality enhancement and cost efficiency within healthcare ... study of contemporary practice demonstrating that intra-aortic balloon ... for critically ill patients. The single-center, retrospective, observational ... large volume MEGA ® 50cc intra-aortic balloon ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: