Navigation Links
Study Provides Evidence That Obesity Leads To A More Aggressive Ovarian Cancer

A new study states that the outcome of a woman diagnosed with ovarian cancer might be affected on whether or not she is obese// .

A new study that is to be published in the October 1, 2006 issue of CANCER (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/cancer-newsroom), a journal of the American Cancer Society, states to have found evidence claiming that obesity leads to more aggressive types of ovarian cancer. The researchers have stated that they have found significant differences in the histological types of epithelial ovarian cancer depending on body mass index (BMI). They also explained that in women with advanced disease, a higher BMI might be associated with a reduced survival rates.

Increasing evidence points to the importance of being obese (BMI greater than 30) and overweight (BMI between 25 and 30) in the development and prognosis of several cancers, including breast, uterine and colorectal. Their relationship to ovarian cancer is less well understood.

Almost one in 60 women will develop ovarian cancer during their lifetimes. Most will be diagnosed with advanced disease and 70 percent will die in five years, making it one of the most lethal cancers. There are several types of ovarian cancer, but tumours that begin from surface cells of the ovary (epithelial cells) are the most common type. A few recent studies have shown that obese patients have a worse outcome. Scientists hypothesize that higher mortality associated with obesity may be caused by more aggressive tumours rather than delays in diagnosis.

Andrew J. Li, M.D. of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre and Women's Cancer Research Institute at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and colleagues reviewed data from 216 women with ovarian cancer to identify relationships between obesity, ovarian cancer, tumour biology, and outcome.

Comparison of obese (35 of 216) and ideal weight (108 of 216) women showed 29 percent of obese women and 10 percent of ideal weight women had localized disease. However, obesity was significantly associated with both different cellular characteristics of the tumour and outcome in women with advanced disease.

Obese women were more likely to have mucinous types of tumours and tended to have non-serous types as well.

Though increasing BMI was not associated with differences in treatment for women with advanced disease, a BMI greater than 25 was associated with shorter disease-free survival. In addition, increasing BMI was associated almost linearly increasing risk of mortality.

“This study supports the hypothesis that obesity impacts ovarian cancer mortality by influencing tumour biology, conclude the authors. Additionally, the researchers observed “significant differences in the risk of cancer progression and cancer-related mortality associated with increasing BMI in a fairly 'dose-dependent' fashion.”

Source: EurekAlet.
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Tomato Sauce reduces Cancer Risk- Study
2. Study on obesity and heart failure
3. National Lung Study in the process
4. Study casts doubt on keyboard ills
5. Study reveals how stress can make you sick
6. Study reveals how stress can make you sick
7. Study supports vegetable diet
8. Study to look at early surgery to treat epilepsy
9. Its Never Too Late to Stop Smoking,Study Finds
10. New Technique to Study Infants Brain.
11. Groundbreaking Study Gives Hope For Patients With Kidney Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/5/2016)... , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... devoted exclusively to funding innovative lymphoma research and serving the lymphoma community through ... poised to once again host, Swirl, A Wine Tasting Event at the La ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... PROSHRED franchises from across the country gathered at the La Valencia Hotel in ... performers. PROSHRED Chicago was named the year’s most outstanding franchise, walking away ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Regular gym users know the routine: each ... longer to access the treadmills. It’s a predictable trend. After the excesses of November ... get in shape by joining gyms, starting new walking or running routines, or signing ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... ... Boar’s Head Brand®, one of the nation’s leading providers of premium delicatessen ... stress out of your party preparation – follow these easy, yet delicious recipes with ... game. , “The key to hosting a successful game-day party is creating a flavorful ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... , ... At its annual meeting held last week, the American Parkinson Disease ... of Directors. Mr. McDermott succeeds former APDA Chairman, Fred Greene. , "We are pleased ... APDA President and CEO. “Pat has tirelessly served APDA since 2001 when he was ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... Feb. 4, 2016   Bernstein Liebhard LLP today ... the United States District Court for the District of ... "Class") consisting of all persons or entities who purchased common ... INSY ) from March 3, 2015 through January 25, ... of its officers with violations of the Securities Exchange Act ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... Feb. 4, 2016 Summary Breast cancer, ... and the most common cancer in women worldwide, accounting ... exceedingly prevalent. The number of women diagnosed with breast ... the number of deaths has declined due to earlier ... has been revolutionized in the past four decades, especially ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... Feb. 4, 2016 Mettler-Toledo International Inc. (NYSE: ... 2015.  Provided below are the highlights: , ... compared with the prior year.  Reported sales decreased 3% ... quarter. , Net earnings per diluted share as ... prior- year period.  Adjusted EPS was $4.65, an increase ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: