Navigation Links
Social Factors Not Genetics Drive Racial Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Survival

Correcting social, economic and healthcare inequalities may have the most significant impact in reducing survival differences in colorectal cancer (CRC) between African// Americans and Caucasians, according to a new study. Published in the June 1, 2007 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, a meta-analysis of data from published studies demonstrated that when socioeconomic factors and treatment utilization were controlled for or equalized, racial disparities were reduced substantially.

Lower socioeconomic status (SES) is well known to be associated with poorer health outcomes, including higher death rates. It is linked to impediments to healthcare access and receiving suboptimal care; higher risk of exposure to occupational and environmental hazards; and riskier behavior and less healthy lifestyles.

Survival differences in CRC between African Americans and whites have been well documented in the epidemiology literature. At the beginning of the 21st century, African Americans were dying from CRC at significant higher rates than white Americans. At five years after diagnosis, almost half of African Americans would be dead from CRC compared to just one third (35 percent) of white Americans. Research indicates that factors such as lower utilization of screening tests, lower rates of surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy, more aggressive tumors, and poor post-treatment surveillance contribute to lower survival rates. However, the fundamental causes of these associations, including the importance of biologic versus socioeconomic factors, remain poorly characterized.

For their new study, Dr. Xianglin Du, Tamra Meyer, and Dr. Luisa Franzini of the University Of Texas School Of Public Health at Houston reviewed the literature and aggregated the data from ten studies that investigated the association between CRC survival and race/ethnicity after controlling for SES and treatment. The meta-analysis approach aims to systematically review the existing literature, to allow a more objective appraisal of the evidence, to examine the heterogeneity between the studies, and if appropriate, to enhance the precision of the effect estimates.

The authors found that the overall risk of CRC-related death was only slightly elevated after adjusting for SES and treatment. African Americans had only marginally higher CRC mortality (hazard ratio: 1.13, 95 percent confidence interval: 1.01-1.28) and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio: 1.14, 95 percent confidence interval: 1.00-1.29).

"These findings," conclude the authors, "demonstrated that there is no strong evidence of racial disparities in survival between African-Americans and Caucasians with colon cancer after accounting for racial differences in socioeconomic status." Therefore, conclude the authors, "efforts to eliminate racial disparities in health care and to minimize disparities in socioeconomic status have the potential to reduce racial inequalities in colon cancer survival."

Source-IANS/V
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Social anxiety has hope from a new drug
2. Socializing is good for your heart
3. Socialization A Serious Trouble For Childhood Cancer Survivors
4. Going Down The Social Ladder Increases The Chances Of Male Depression.
5. Shy Bladder Syndrome: A Social Phobia Or Functional Disorder Of Micturition?
6. Need For Social Churning Emphasized In CMC Meet On ‘Leadership In Healthcare
7. Viewing Loss Of Virginity As A Social Phenomenon
8. Chennai AIDS Campaign Highlights The Social Neglect Faced By Victims
9. Social Bonds And Good Sleep Help The Elderly
10. Internet Helps Strengthen Social Ties
11. Social work by clerics in checking the spread of AIDS
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... Technique, technique, technique – ... when either lifting weights for strength training and exercise or simply lifting heavy objects, ... , “Body position is everything,” Dr. Chang says. “Improper technique in lifting anything heavy ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... MDLand International (MDLand), a ... today that its iClinic V12.2 solution has achieved approval from National Center for ... PCMH 2017 standards which emphasize team-based care with a significant focus on the ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... May 23, 2017 , ... Allegheny ... to open The Alexis Joy D’Achille Center for Women’s Behavioral Health at West ... available in western Pennsylvania for women suffering from pregnancy-related depression. Construction of the ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... ... Carolina have remained steady since 2009, according to a Workers Compensation Research Institute ... study Monitoring the North Carolina System: CompScope™ Benchmarks, 17th Edition looks ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... Rosa, California (PRWEB) , ... May 23, 2017 ... ... health management (PHM) technology and a 2017 Best in KLAS category winner, has ... advantageous market position to extend and enhance its technology platform and product offerings,” ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/6/2017)... CHICAGO , May 5, 2017  May is ... of one of the most important methods to prevent ... to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, undetected ... stroke. 1 Omron, the global leader in personal ... on the elimination of heart attack and stroke and ...
(Date:5/4/2017)... , May 4, 2017  Fortuna Fix Inc. (" ... to be the first to eliminate the need for embryonic ... cells to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Fortuna ... with Professor Michael Fehlings , MD, PhD; Father ... , MD, MPH; and Professor James Giordano , PhD. ...
(Date:5/4/2017)... Clarius Mobile Health, a digital healthcare ... this week at the American Congress of Obstetricians ... San Diego, CA from May ... perfect tool for clinicians to easily confirm pregnancy, ... pregnancy-related complications like ectopic pregnancy and placenta previa," ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: