Navigation Links
Single Protein Plays A Major Role In Prion Diseases

A single protein plays a major role in deadly prion diseases by smashing up clusters of these infectious proteins,// creating the "seeds" that allow fatal brain illnesses to quickly spread, new Brown University research shows.

The findings are exciting, researchers say, because they might reveal a way to control the spread of prions through drug intervention. If a drug could be made that inhibits this fragmentation process, it could substantially slow the spread of prions, which cause mad cow disease and scrapie in animals and, in rare cases, Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease and kuru in humans.

Because similar protein replication occurs in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, such a drug could also slow progression of these diseases as well.

"The protein fragmentation we studied has a big impact on how fast prion diseases spread and may also play a role in the accumulation of toxic proteins in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's," said Tricia Serio, an assistant professor in Brown's Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry and lead researcher on the project.

The findings from Serio and her team, which appear online in PLoS Biology, build on their groundbreaking work published in Nature in 2005. That research showed that prions - strange, self-replicating proteins that cause fatal brain diseases - convert healthy protein into abnormal protein through an ultrafast process.

This good-gone-bad conversion is one way that prions multiply and spread disease. But scientists believe that there is another crucial step in this propagation process - fragmentation of existing prion complexes. Once converted, the thinking goes, clusters of "bad" or infectious protein are smashed into smaller bits, a process that creates "seeds" so that prions multiply more quickly in the body. Hsp104, a molecule known to be required for prion replication, could function as this protein "crusher," Serio thought.

To test these ideas, Serio and members of her lab studied Sup35, a yeast protein similar to the human prion protein PrP. They put Sup35 together with Hsp104, then activated and deactivated Hsp104. They found that the protein does, indeed, chop up Sup35 complexes - the first direct evidence that this process occurs in a living cell and that Hsp104 is the culprit.

"To understand how fragmentation speeds the spread of prions, think of a dandelion," Serio said. "A dandelion head is a cluster of flowers that each carries a seed. When the flower dries up and the wind blows, the seeds disperse. Prion protein works the same way. Hsp104 acts like the wind, blowing apart the flower and spreading the seeds." Serio said that prions still multiply without fragmentation. However, she said, they do so at a much slower rate. So a drug that blocked the activity of Hsp104 could seriously slow progression of prion-related diseases.



Source-Bio-Bio Technology
SRI
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Single gene analysis for diagnosis of a range of blood disorders
2. Single drug for bipolar disorder
3. Treating Testicular Cancer With A Single Dose Of Chemotherapy
4. Decreasing Multiple Births By Single Embryo Transfers
5. Single gene skin cancer cause
6. Drug Firms To Produce Single Pill AIDS Treatment
7. Malaria May Gain Resistance To Single Drug Prescriptions
8. Single Women with Baby Cravings Can Actually Cradle their Own, Courtesy NHS
9. Thai Doctors Removed 421 Kidney Stones From A Single Person
10. Single Dose Of Azithromycin Could Cure Trichiasis
11. Effects Of Certain Food Related To Single Pain Receptors
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... “America On The Brink”: the ... “America On The Brink” is the creation of published author, William Nowers. Captain ... As a WWII veteran, he spent thirty years in the Navy. Following his ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The company has developed a suite of ... authorities worldwide. From Children’s to Adults 50+, every formula has been developed by ... , These products are also: Gluten Free, Non-GMO, Vegan, Soy Free, Non-Dairy*, Preservative ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Information about ... intend to develop to enable prevention of a major side effect of chemotherapy ... especially in pediatric patients. For cisplatin, hearing loss is FDA listed on-label as ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... On Saturday, October 21, the Health & Wellness ... Moonlight to raise money for the American Heart Association Heart Walk. Teams of up ... work together to keep their treadmills moving for 5 hours. Treadmills will start at ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... wound care advancements to physician colleagues, skilled nursing facility medical directors and other ... Treacherous Waters of Wound Care." , "At many of these conferences we get ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/23/2017)... , Sept. 22, 2017 Janssen Biotech, ... complete response letter from the U.S. Food and Drug ... approval of sirukumab for the treatment of moderately to ... indicates additional clinical data are needed to further evaluate ... to severely active RA. ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... 2017   ZirMed Inc ., a recognized leader in ... it has been ranked #1 by its users for the ... 2017 User Survey. ZirMed was recognized as the top-ranked end-to-end ... medical centers over 200 beds and holds one of the ... survey history. ...
(Date:9/12/2017)... 12, 2017   EcoVadis , the leading platform for environmental, social ... annual edition of its Global CSR Risk and Performance Index. The report ... based on Scorecard Ratings that analyzed nearly 800,000 data points across the ... ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: