Navigation Links
Scientists Report New Take on Sexual Signaling

In dangerous environments, females looking for a mate run great risks. Scientists from Seoul National University, in Korea, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama present a new take on sexual signaling in the May issue of the Public Library of Science. The researchers report that females prefer a male sexual signal that helps them avoid their predators as they sequentially visit and assess potential mates.

The traditional explanation for the evolution of outrageous sexual signals like the male peacocks plumage is that showy males attract females and give them better offspring. Showy males escape from predators despite their highly conspicuous ornaments and behaviorsproof of their superiority.

"In our study of fiddler crabs, the strength of female preference for a male signal that increases her own survival increases with her perceived risk of predation. That a females choice of a mate is based on sexual signals that benefit her directly is a fundamentally new and perhaps widely applicable idea," said Tae Won Kim, who did this work as a student at Seoul National University and is now a post-doctoral fellow at Ewha Womens University in Korea.

As the tide recedes, revealing great expanses of Pacific beach, fiddler crabs (Uca terpsichores) segue in and out of their burrows, dodging predatory shorebirds. Male crabs build hood-like sand castles next to the entrance of their burrows, attracting the attention of females by waving their one, super-sized claw.

Females prefer males that have built hoods to males that have not. When they run across the beach to check out or mate with a male, they orient visually to both the waving male and to his hood. In this way they reach the males burrow quickly and directly and avoid their predators.

"When we bait predatory birds into the areaartificially increasing the risk of predation, females show an even greater preference for males who have built hoods," sa id STRI staff scientist John Christy, who has studied sexual selection in this group for nearly 35 years. This study illustrates how the ecology of choosing a mate can shape sexual communication. "Conspicuous male sexual signals need not advertise the quality of the signaler as a mate," Christy suggests. "Some may simply allow choosy females to stay safe."


Related medicine news :

1. Scientists plan human cloning clinic in the United States
2. Scientists found ancient Human Germ Killer
3. Scientists locate key hormone involved in appetite control
4. Scientists open the book of life
5. Scientists review SARS
6. Scientists crack dengue fever puzzle
7. Scientists push to lower hidden sodium in food
8. Indian Scientists Make Wide-Ranging Analysis And Annotation Of X Chromosome
9. Scientists have found effective brain regions for deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s
10. Scientists reveal the secrets of sarcasm
11. Scientists Unveil Mechanism Behind Resistance to Severe Malaria
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Until now, the St. Louis ... the MOMS (Management of Myelomeningocele Study) trial. One of these exclusion criteria was a ... BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal, 25 - 29.9 is overweight and ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... . The directory is specialized and only includes chiropractic clinics in the US. ... competent and trustworthy alternative health practitioner when back pain sets in. When people ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... Creek, Michigan (PRWEB) , ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... MI, the American Cancer Society held an annual fundraising event, a 5K walk known ... a holistic treatment center for substance abuse which is also located in Battle Creek, ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... a University of Delaware Accounting and Management of Information Systems course. Based in ... mid-market businesses. Sommer will speak at before student in the Enterprise Resource Planning ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) , ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... has teamed up with Public Television’s Travel With Kids to promote ... follows the Simmons family as they explore international destinations and educate families about the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... TOKYO , 1 décembre 2015 ... plus grande exposition et conférence d,Asie ... médicaux et sur l,industrie manufacturière, se ... du 20 au 22 avril ... - Photo - ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... Die MEDTEC Japan 2016, ... Entwicklung und Herstellung medizinischer Geräte, findet ... in Tokyo ... Foto: ... --> ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... 30, 2015 MEDTEC Japan 2016, Asia,s largest ... to be held in Tokyo from 20 th  - 22 nd April 2016. ... -->   --> --> ... the United States . With the aging population and the government back ... steadily. --> the United States . With the aging ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: