Navigation Links
Scientists Identify New Possible 'biomarker' for Pancreatic Cancer

University of Cincinnati researchers have identified a specific cell receptor, which they say is a potential biological target for pancreatic cancer.

Led by Dr. Andrew Lowy and Dr. Susan Waltz, the study found that the RON receptor tyrosine kinase was "over-expressed" in pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting that the receptor may also contribute to the disease's development.

The researchers say that their findings, published in the journal Cancer Research, may help scientists better understand and treat the disease that kills more than 33,000 people each year.

Published in the journal Cancer Research, this is the first study to establish the link between the RON receptor and pancreatic cancer. The report also tells that receptor tyrosine kinases are proteins on the cell surface used to activate specific body functions like cell growth and migration.

"A normal pancreas has very low levels of RON, but our study showed that as tumours progress, so does the level of RON expression in the pancreas cells -- and those over expressed levels were maintained in 'metastases,' the areas that the tumours spread to," explains Waltz, Associate Professor and Director of the Oncology Research Program, Surgery Department, Cincinnati University.

During the study, the researchers noted that the RON receptor was active in 93 per cent of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, an early form of pancreatic duct cancer. They also observed that the receptor was present in 79 per cent of primary pancreatic cancers, and 83 per cent of metastatic cancers.

Waltz believes that the RON receptor's signalling pathways may be a key factor contributing to pancreatic cancer progression, and that it may give drug developers a new target for RON directed therapies that are more effective in treating the deadly disease.

"When cells became invasive, we saw higher levels of RON expression that correlated with the aggressive nature of this disease and cancer metastasis. Clearly, this signaling pathway is associated with pancreatic cancer and merits further investigation," Waltz said.

During the study, the researchers used the protein HGFL to activate the RON receptor.

They observed that though stimulating the RON receptor had no effect on pancreatic cell growth, blocking it with targeted antibodies killed more cancer cells than did the standard treatment drug gemcitabine alone.

"Our findings suggest that combining antibodies that block the RON receptor and the standard chemotherapy drugs might stop progression of pancreatic cancer more effectively. RON could be a promising molecular target for future cancer drug development," says Waltz.

However, the researchers, who had reported in December last year the association between the RON receptor and breast cancer, say that further studies is needed before blockers for the RON receptors may be used for human testing.


'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Scientists plan human cloning clinic in the United States
2. Scientists found ancient Human Germ Killer
3. Scientists locate key hormone involved in appetite control
4. Scientists open the book of life
5. Scientists review SARS
6. Scientists crack dengue fever puzzle
7. Scientists push to lower hidden sodium in food
8. Indian Scientists Make Wide-Ranging Analysis And Annotation Of X Chromosome
9. Scientists have found effective brain regions for deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s
10. Scientists reveal the secrets of sarcasm
11. Scientists Unveil Mechanism Behind Resistance to Severe Malaria
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 2016 , ... To succeed under value-based payments, healthcare providers ... how to move forward, given the need to sustain current operations. PYA has ... an organization’s specific needs. , PYA Principal Martie Ross states, “Healthcare providers want ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Brooklyn, New York (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... medical marijuana patients optimize the ingestion of their medication by matching users with high ... allows users to compare pieces with no commitment. , Inhale was founded by two ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Dr. Seema Daulat, a native Texan and University of Texas at Austin ... July 13, 2016. , Dr. Daulat earned her Doctorate of Medicine (MD) at The ... the Agape Clinic serving Dallas’ underprivileged community. , Following medical school, Dr. Daulat completed ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... being conducted that may expose a possible link between head and neck cancer in ... individuals participating in the study were evaluated based on whether they had gum disease, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... ... The Mechille Wilson Agency, a Texas-based insurance company that provides coverage to hundreds ... a charity drive to assist a student to be chosen from the local area. ... be presented to the chosen student to help with the growing costs of tuition, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Bracket , a leading clinical ... generation clinical outcomes platform, Bracket eCOA (SM) 6.0, at ... 26 – 30, 2016 in Philadelphia , ... Outcome Assessment product of its kind to fully integrate with ... Bracket eCOA 6.0 is a flexible platform for electronic clinical ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... and INDIANAPOLIS , June ... receiving a Lilly Diabetes Tomorrow,s Leaders Scholarship is any ... scholarship winners, announced today online at www.diabetesscholars.org ... type 1 diabetes stand in the way of academic ... supported the Foundation,s scholarship program since 2012, and continues ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Revolutionary technology includes multi-speaker ... , industry leaders in advanced audiology and hearing aid ... Opn ™, the world,s first internet connected hearing aid ... devices.      (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160622/382240 ) ... of ,world firsts,: , TwinLink™ - the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: