Navigation Links
Radiation Therapy Made More Compatible

According to the research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and colleagues at Stony Brook University // , the IRCCS Neuromed Medical Center in Italy, and Georgetown University it was found that improvements in the existing radiation therapy led to more effective treatment. This then could be widely used in the hospital scenario.

These improved techniques were initially tested on rats and the results of the study are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The technique, microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), previously used a high-intensity synchrotron x-ray source such as a superconducting wiggler at Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) to produce parallel arrays of very thin (25 to 90 micrometers) planar x-ray beams (picture the parallel panels of window blinds in the open position) instead of the unsegmented (solid), broad beams used in conventional radiation treatment. Previous studies conducted at Brookhaven and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France demonstrated MRT's ability to control malignant tumors in animals with high radiation doses while subjecting adjacent normal tissue to little collateral damage.

But the technique has limitations. For one thing, only certain synchrotrons can generate its very thin beams at adequate intensity, and such facilities are available at only a few research centers around the world. ‘The new development seeks a way out of this situation,’ explained Brookhaven scientist Avraham Dilmanian, lead author of the new study. In this paper, the scientists report results that demonstrate the potential efficacy of significantly thicker microbeams, as well as a way to ‘interlace’ the beams within a well-defined ‘target’ inside the subject to increase their killing potential there, while retaining the technique's hallmark feature of sparing healthy tissue outside that target. First, they exposed the spin al cords and brains of healthy rats to thicker (0.27 to 0.68 millimeter) microbeams at high doses of radiation and monitored the animals for signs of tissue damage.

After seven months, animals exposed to beams as thick as 0.68 millimeter showed no or little damage to the nervous system. ‘This demonstrates that the healthy-tissue-sparing nature of the technique stays strong at a beam thickness that is within a range that could be produced by specialized x-ray tubes of extremely high voltage and current,’ Dilmanian said. Such x-ray sources may become available sometime in the future and may allow the implementation of the method in hospitals. Next, the scientists demonstrated the ability to "interlace" two parallel arrays of the thicker microbeams at a 90-degree angle to form a solid beam at a small target volume in the rats' brains, and measured the effects of varying doses of radiation on the targeted tissue volume and the surrounding tissue using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.

For interlacing, the gaps between the beams in each array were chosen to be the same as the thickness of each beam, so the beams from one array would fill the gaps in the other to produce the equivalent of an unsegmented beam in the target volume only. ‘In this way we are effectively delivering an unsegmented broad beam type of dose to just the target region -- which could be a tumor, or a non-tumerous target we want to ablate -- while exposing the surrounding tissue to segmented radiation from which it can recover,’ Dilmanian said. The MRI scans showed that at a particular dose of radiation, the new configuration could produce major damage to the target volume but virtually no damage beyond the target range.

‘The dose of radiation delivered to the target volume would have been enough to ablate a malignant tumor,’ Dilmanian said. ‘These results show that thick microbeams generated by special x-ray tubes in hospitals could eventually be used to destroy s elective targets while sparing healthy tissue,’ Dilmanian said. Said collaborator Eliot Rosen, a radiation oncologist at Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, ‘This form of microbeam radiation therapy could improve the treatment of many forms of cancer now treated with radiation, because it can deliver a more lethal dose to the tumor while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. It may also extend the use of radiation to cases where it is now used only judiciously, such as brain cancer in patients under three years of age, because of the high sensitivity of young brain tissue to radiation.’ And according to collaborators David Anschel, a neurologist at Stony Brook University and Brookhaven Lab, and Pantaleo Romanelli, a neurosurgeon from NEUROMED Medical Center, the technique may also have applications in treating a wide range of benign and malignant brain tumors and other functional brain disorders such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease.

Soure: Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Radiation before surgery cuts cancer recurrence
2. UV Radiation induces Melanoma
3. Radiation reduces cancer recurrence
4. Radiation before surgery cuts cancer reappearance
5. Radiation Not Needed for Childhood Cancers
6. Does Radiation Cause Lung Cancer?
7. Radiation for Bone Pain
8. Radiation for Bone Pain
9. Radiation after Breast Reconstruction
10. Radiation Exposure Found To Affect Intellect Later In Life
11. Radiation Therapy An Effective Solution For Recurrent Prostate Cancer
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 2015 , ... The recently published 32nd Annual Report of ... that in 2014, someone called a poison center about every 11 seconds. America’s ... human exposure cases. , The American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) maintains ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... The Foundation for Breast ... and prevention—is joining forces with the award-winning creator and writer of Downton Abbey ... 7, 2015 at the Union League of Philadelphia. , The benefit, titled ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... , ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... magazine, quoted Michael Hansen, Ph.D., a senior scientist at Consumer Reports as supporting ... so for a child’s exposure limits. , The original Nov 2015 CR story ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... An inventor from Charlottesville, Va., is concerned about ... baby had high blood pressure due to loud noises," she said, "so I decided ... noise pollution as well as radio waves and microwaves." , The baby BABY MUFF ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... CHICAGO (PRWEB) , ... November ... ... introduced two new additions to its industry-leading suite of automated breast density ... of North America (RSNA) meeting, November 29-December 4, 2015 (South Hall booth ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... VIEW, Calif. , Nov. 30, 2015 ... been the norm in U.S. medical imaging ... The increasingly popular accountable care payer-provider contracts ... models and, in their wake, alter provider-vendor ... quality-based payments will push forward new purchasing ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... and SAN DIEGO , ... Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ARNA ) today announced that ... for filing the New Drug Application (NDA) for an ... release formulation will offer patients a chronic weight management ... ® ) is currently approved as an adjunct to ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... and ST. LOUIS , Nov. 30, ... ESRX ) today announced an early renewal of ... began in 1999, will now extend through at least ... After evaluating pharmacy benefit manager capabilities during a ... Scripts continues to offer the best health plan integration ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: