Navigation Links
New Carrier Developed To Deliver Drugs to Gliomas

A new vehicle for delivering radioactive iodine dose to cure deadly brain tumors such as gliomas is under investigation.//

Synthetic scorpion venom is used as carriers for radioactive iodine. The first phase of the clinical trials is successfully complete and was conducted by under Adam N. Mamelak, M.D., a neurosurgeon at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute. About 18 patients participated in the trial and it was found to very safe. Now a larger phase two trial is underway to assess the effectiveness of multiple doses. The main advantage of this novel technique is that it does not affect the neighboring tissues or body organs. The study results are published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The key ingredient is TM-601, a synthetic version of a peptide, or protein particle, which naturally occurs in the venom of the Giant Yellow Israeli scorpion.

TM-601 binds to glioma cells and has an unusual ability to pass through the blood-brain barrier that blocks most substances from reaching brain tissue from the bloodstream. ‘We're using the TM-601 primarily as a carrier to transport radioactive iodine to glioma cells, although there are data to suggest that it may also slow down the growth of tumor cells. If studies continue to confirm this, we may be able to use it in conjunction with other treatments, such as chemotherapy, because there may be a synergistic effect. In other words, TM-601's ability to impede cancer growth could allow us to reduce the dose of chemotherapy to achieve a therapeutic effect,’ said Mamelak, who serves as co-director of the Pituitary Center at Cedars-Sinai.

About 17,000 Americans are diagnosed with gliomas each year. The tumors are extremely aggressive and deadly, with only eight percent of patients surviving two years and three percent surviving five years from time of diagnosis. Even when surgery is performed to remove a glioma, some cancer cells invariably remain behind and pro liferate. ‘Despite advances in surgical technology, radiation therapy and cancer-killing drugs, length of survival has remained virtually unchanged for patients with gliomas,’ said Keith L. Black, M.D., director of the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute and interim chair of Cedars-Sinai's Department of Neurosurgery. ‘Only in the recent past have we begun to discover some of the molecular, genetic and immunologic mechanisms that enable these deadly cancer cells to evade or defy our treatments, and we are developing innovative approaches, such as this one, that capitalize on these revelations.’

Patients who consented to participate in the Phase I study first underwent tumor-removal surgery. Fourteen to 28 days later, a single, low dose of radioactive iodine (131I) attached to TM-601 was injected through a small tube into the cavity from which the tumor had been removed. Although TM-601 had been tested in earlier laboratory and animal experiments, it had never been given to humans. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to document that 131I-TM-601 could be administered to humans safely. In addition, the researchers sought to begin to assess the drug's anti-tumor effect and dosing standards. Six patients agreed to receive additional doses at one of three different levels (.25 mg. of TM-601, .5 mg. of TM-601, and 1 mg. of TM-601, each carrying the same amount of iodine).

‘In this first human trial, treatment of patients with recurrent high-grade glioma with a single intracavitary dose of 131I-TM-601 was well tolerated to the maximum dose …. Very few adverse side effects occurred during the initial 22-day observation period, suggesting the dosing level of peptide used in this study is safe and well-tolerated in humans,’ the article states. While median length of survival for all patients was 27 weeks, two patients, women in their early 40s, had a ‘complete radiographic response,’ meaning there was no evidence of residual tumor accordi ng to magnetic resonance imaging scans. The patients were still alive beyond 33 and 35 months after surgery, despite the low dose of TM-601 and radiation levels that were below expected therapeutic levels. Analyses also showed that most of the radioactivity delivered by the drug left the region within 24 hours of administration.

That which lingered was ‘tightly localized to the tumor cavity and surrounding regions, suggesting discrete binding to the tumor.’ The drug was eliminated primarily through the urine, with radiation doses to the thyroid and other vital organs remaining extremely low and harmless. Mamelak said TM-601 binds to tumors other than gliomas, and this therapy will be studied in a variety of tumor types. He conducted this study with colleagues from City of Hope Cancer Center in Duarte, the University of Alabama at Birmingham, St. Louis University in Missouri, and TransMolecular, Inc., of Birmingham. TransMolecular also provided funding for the study.

Source:Eurekalert
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Alzheimer Gene Carriers Found To Have Memory Problems
2. Fruit Bats Act As Carriers of Ebola Virus
3. Financial Allowances Being Offered To Poor Vietnamese HIV Carriers
4. Coffee Reduces Risk of Breast Cancer in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers
5. A Carrier Protein Associates With Human Insulin Resistance
6. Genital Herpes - No Symptoms But A Potent Carrier
7. HIV Carriers Join Hands to Fight for their Rights
8. HIV Carriers Form an Association to Fight Social Stigma in Jharkhand
9. Carriers With Alzheimers High Risk Gene Type Age Normally Until the Disease Strikes
10. No Carrier Necessary: This Drug Delivers Itself
11. Scientists Developed Map For Brain Molecular Communities
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/24/2017)... ... 2017 , ... “End Time GPS”: a dauntless and enlightened study of ... GPS” is the creation of published author, Wesley Gerboth, a World War II veteran, ... space-vehicle projects. Now, at age ninety-one, he shares the Wisdom God bestowed upon him ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... ... March 24, 2017 , ... “The Adventures of Joey, The Dog Who ... who lives his life to the fullest, as God intended. “The Adventures of Joey, ... a mother and grandmother pursuing her passion for writing, especially about truth and human ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... The physicians of KSF Orthopaedic ... greater Houston Area. The new location is located at 2255 E. Mossy Oaks Rd., ... Village. This newest location will provide patients living in the north Houston area (The ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Montclair, NJ (PRWEB) , ... March 23, 2017 ... ... the Renaissance Oklahoma City Convention Center at 10 North Broadway Avenue, will be ... 6.0 hours of relevant, practical instruction in the management of chronic pain. , ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... , ... March 23, 2017 , ... 82% of adults are unaware of the dangers ... not brush their teeth the minimum two times a day that dentists recommend. The ramifications ... 51 million hours of school and adults missing 164 million hours of work each year ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... , March 23, 2017 The key ... population, increasing diabetic population, accelerating economic growth and increasing healthcare ... industry are higher life expectancy of ESRD patients, rising demand ... markets. However, the expansion of the market is hindered by ... ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... , March 23, 2017  Transportation Insight, a ... an end-to-end supply chain management firm with expertise serving ... Product Solutions Rick Zaffarano was named a ... the Supply Chain by the only publication exclusively dedicated ... food supply chain. "Rick has brought to ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... INDIANAPOLIS , March 23, 2017  Eli ... the William Sansum Diabetes Center have established a research ... by diabetes through enhanced research, education and care. ... disease bears a disproportionate weight on Latino families in ... David Kerr , M.D., FRCPE, director of Innovation and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: