Navigation Links
NSAIDs In First trimester Linked To Congenital Anomalies In Babies

The use of NSAID by women in their first trimester could be associated with cardiac abnormalities in babies. //

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs, Cardiac septal defects, Journal Birth Defects Research Part B, Trimester, Pregnancy, Case control, Congenital abnormality, Diabetes

Women who take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) early in their pregnancies may be more likely to give birth to babies with congenital defects.

The findings of a new case controlled study has been published in the August issue of the journal Birth Defects Research Part B, which is published by John Wiley & Sons, states that congenital birth defects especially cardiac septal defects, could be associated with the use of NSAID by women in their first trimester. It was reported that article is also available online via Wiley Interscience www.interscience.wiley.com/
journal/bdrb.

Many pregnant women get prescriptions for NSAIDs during their first trimester, and even more--up to 15 percent--take over-the-counter versions of these drugs. Previous studies have shown that taking NSAIDs toward the end of a pregnancy can cause certain circulatory problems--premature closure of the ductus arteriosus and patent ductus arteriosus, but the risks related to early-pregnancy ingestion are less well defined.

To better understand the relationship between first trimester use of NSAIDs and congenital birth defects, researchers led by Anick Berard, Ph.D. of St. Justine Hospital in Montreal, conducted a population-based case-control study. They gathered information from three administrative databases in Quebec and included 36,387 pregnant women in their study. They determined which women had filled prescriptions for NSAIDs during their first trimester and which had babies diagnosed with a congenital abnormality in the first year of life. Based on information from previous studies, the primary outcome of interest was cardiac septa l closure and related abnormalities.

For each infant diagnosed with a congenital abnormality, the researchers matched up to ten controls by date of conception and maternal age, region of residence, and diabetes status. They performed statistical analyses to uncover any associations between the congenital abnormalities and the mother's use of NSAIDs during the first trimester.

Among the 1056 women who filled a prescription for NSAIDs early in their pregnancy, 8.8 percent had babies with congenital anomalies. Of the 35,331 women who did not fill prescriptions for NSAIDs, 7 percent had congenital anomalies. The difference was more pronounced for cardiac septal abnormalities. Furthermore, the proportion of infants with multiple congenital anomalies among mothers who filled an NSAID prescription in the first trimester and those who did not was 16.1 percent vs. 14.2 percent respectively.

"Our analysis of data from the Medication and Pregnancy registry suggests that women who fill prescriptions for NSAIDs in the first trimester of pregnancy may be at greater risk of having children with congenital anomalies, particularly those related to cardiac septal closure," the authors conclude. "This is in accordance with previous findings, but needs to be replicated in other study populations."

(Source: EurekAlert)
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. The Effectiveness Of NSAIDs Evaluated
2. Study Explains How NSAIDs Halt Cancer Growth
3. Aspirin Or NSAIDs Will not Prevent Colorectal Cancer
4. First Vaccine Designed for Africa Cleared for Testing in Humans
5. Ajanta Launches Worlds First Once-A-Day Nimesulide Oral Formulation
6. First human clone is near
7. First Artificial Heart patient has Major setback
8. First head-to-head trials of once weekly Fosamax and Actonel therapies
9. WHO Declares Vietnam First Country to Control SARS
10. Russia Reports First SARS Case
11. Hope for First New Melanoma Treatment in Decades
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/8/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Stephanie Hebert Insurance Agency, serving families of ... charity campaign. As part of their ongoing community involvement program, funds are now ... children deserve a voice, and in the spirit of neighbors helping neighbors in ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Brenton Engineering , powered by Pro ... wrapped products at WestPack 2015, February 9-11, in Anaheim, California. This new solution ... or fully-automatic case packing with a small footprint, rugged, highly flexible, and cost-effective ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Hilton Head Island, SC (PRWEB) , ... February 08, 2016 , ... ... Head and surrounding areas with a vital new community enrichment program, has teamed up ... to local women and children suffering from intimate abuse. To support all those victimized ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... , ... Delta Dental of California and its affiliated companies announced today that ... who recently retired as president and CEO of Delta Dental of California and its ... Year , helped lead the effort to raise funds for studies to strengthen pancreatic ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... Eating disorders ... significant number of women and men with eating disorders report a history of ... predicts the development of an eating disorder. , At the 2016 iaedp ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... 8, 2016 /PRNewswire/--  Cell Applications, Inc. and ... services are now available in North ... (3D) bioprinting approach called the "Kenzan Method." Utilizing ... a state-of-the-art robotic system that fabricates 3D tissue ... pay-for-service bio-printing model that makes scaffold-free tissue available ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Feb. 8, 2016 ... of the "Label-Free Detection Market by ... 2020" report to their offering. ... addition of the "Label-Free Detection Market ... to 2020" report to their offering. ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , Feb. 8, 2016  Astellas Pharma Inc. President and ... promotion of James Robinson as president, Americas Operations, ... in North and South America , effective ... US, representing the commercial organization in the United ... Masao Yoshida , who is retiring in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: