Navigation Links
Mouse Model Demonstrates Immune System Reaction In Chlamydia Infection

Harvard Medical School (HMS) researchers have mapped out the way immune system in mouse models responds to germs in the genital tract //during the initial stage of Chlamydia trachomatis infection. The study is published in the July 24 early edition online of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and could prove important in the development of vaccine against the disease.

"Right now Chlamydia is sensitive to treatment with antibiotics, but the problem is that many people have 'silent' infections that remain untreated," said researcher Michael Starnbach, PhD, HMS associate professor of microbiology and molecular genetics. "These undiagnosed infections over time lead to complications like tubal pregnancy and infertility. The goal would be to vaccinate young people to keep them from suffering from undiagnosed infection and the bad outcomes associated with it."

Most pathogens (disease-causing bacteria or viruses) enter a host by penetrating mucosal surfaces such as the lung, intestine, or genito-urinary tract. The prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases has prompted studies to understand how infection is established in the genital tract and how pathogens are cleared from this site. Before Starnbach's study, however, it had not been possible to monitor invader-specific T cell (fighter cell) responses to initial infection in reproductive tissue, despite the recognized importance of T cells in controlling a number of genital pathogens

"Humans and mice have an enormous variety of T cells that are prepared to respond to pathogens – even pathogens to which they have never been exposed," Starnbach said. "Yet prior to infection, the number of T cells specific for any single pathogen is extremely low. The number is so low that it is impossible to track and monitor the activity of these T cells during their first encounter with the microbe."

To circumvent the problem, Starnbach and colleagues in the HMS Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics identified one of the Chlamydia proteins recognized by T cells during infection and engineered mice where all the T cells in the mice exclusively respond to this Chlamydia protein. These mice are known as T cell receptor transgenic (TCRtg) mice and have none of the T cell diversity found in a normal mouse. Starnbach and his team harvested T cells from the Chlamydia-specific TCRtg mice, labeled them with a dye, and injected them into normal mice. By boosting the number of Chlamydia-specific T cells in the recipient mice, they were able to identify and monitor them as they responded to infection.

"We found that when the recipient mice were infected with Chlamydia, the labeled T cells became activated specifically in the lymph nodes near the reproductive tract, expanded in number in those lymph nodes, and migrated into the mucosa lining the genital tract," Starnbach said. "We also found that the T cells recruited to the genital mucosa secrete gamma interferon as they respond to Chlamydia infection. Gamma interferon secretion has been described as the key molecule T cells use to rid the body of Chlamydia."

The findings show how T cell responses can be studied in reproductive tissues, which is likely to reveal avenues to the development of vaccines against Chlamydia, and possibly other STDs.

"In this report, we identify one candidate protein, Cta1, and show that T cells specific for Cta1 can reduce Chlamydia infection," Starnbach said. "In designing a vaccine, we would want to make sure the vaccine stimulates T cells with characteristics that cause them to home to the genital tract - the site of infection. We also would want them to respond with the same arsenal of protective factors – such as the secretion of gamma interferon that we show occurs using our TCRtg tools."

The goal of vaccines is to stimulate a response that mimics exposure to a pathogen, without the risks of actual infecti on. When a vaccine successfully accomplishes this, protection against future infection results.

Contact: Judith Montminy

public_affairs@hms.harvard.edu

617-432-0442

Harvard Medical School

Source: Eurekalert
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Mouse Allergen Found In Homes Could Trigger Asthma In Kids
2. Researchers Develop Mouse Model Of Brain Tumor
3. German Scientists Create Stem Cells From Mouse Testes
4. Mouse Models To Determine The Cause Of Aggressive Leukemia
5. Mouse Model Beneficial to Study of Head and Neck Cancer
6. Scientists Discover New RNAs in Mouse Testicles
7. Scientists Isolate Leukemia Stem Cells in Mouse Model
8. Mouse Gene With Gene Stutter Will Help Leukemia Research
9. Rett Syndrome Reversed in Genetic Mouse Model
10. Treatment Extends Survival in Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy
11. Mouse Study Suggests Anxiety Disorders Take Root in Infancy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/26/2016)... ... ... a legally blind and certified personal trainer is helping to develop a weight loss fitness ... to fix the two major problems leading the fitness industry today:, , ... They don’t eliminate all the reasons people quit their exercise program ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... California (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... "With ... fit their specific project," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. ... customizable and all within Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ProHand ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether it’s a matter of ... too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, those who set the ... Research from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency to set low expectations ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Pulmonary Hypertension Association ... it will receive two significant new grants to support its work to advance ... 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists for their work in ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the U.S. are sharpening their pencils ... an essay contest in which patients and their families pay tribute to a genetic ... 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education Conference (AEC) this September. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Research and Markets has ... Market Analysis 2016 - Forecast to 2022" report to ... report contains up to date financial data derived from varied ... major trends with potential impact on the market during the ... segmentation which comprises of sub markets, regional and country level ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016 Research and Markets has ... 52" report to their offering. ... creates a favourable commercial environment for MedImmune to enter. The ... that will serve to drive considerable growth for effective anti-influenza ... to cap sales considerably, but development is still in its ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 , , , WHEN: ... 2016 , , , , LOCATION: , , , Online, ... , , EXPERT PANELISTS:  , , , Frost & Sullivan,s Global ... Bird; Senior Industry Analyst, Divyaa Ravishankar and Unmesh Lal, Program Manager ... pharmaceutical industry is witnessing an exceptional era. Several new demand spaces, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: