Navigation Links
Minorities Prefer Counseling and Prayer to Drugs for Treating Depression

Some ethnic minorities could be twice as likely as white and Native American people to prefer counseling and prayer to medication for treating depression , according to a national Internet survey.

African-Americans, Hispanics and Asians who took the survey were skeptical about the biological basis of depression and wary of becoming addicted to antidepressants, according to Jane Givens, M.D., of Boston University Medical Center and colleagues.

The survey results appear in the latest issue of the journal General Hospital Psychiatry.

This study documents that, overall, ethnic minorities hold attitudes toward depression and depression treatment that are distinct from those of white participants, Givens said.

The findings are important because studies show that while minority and white populations suffer from similar rates of depression, diagnosis and treatment are less likely for members of minority populations.

Junling Wang, Ph.D., a researcher at the University of Tennessee, College of Pharmacy, recently published a study showing that African-American and Hispanic patients use SSRI antidepressants, which include commonly prescribed medications such as Prozac and Zoloft, less often than white patients do.

Although Wang and her fellow researchers thought SSRI use might signal improved access to health care, we did not study whether the lower use of SSRIs is indicative of fewer health care visits or a lower change of being diagnosed with depression among minorities, she said.

For their study, Givens and colleagues surveyed people with the help of an anonymous Internet depression-screening test offered free on the health information Web site InteliHealth, owned by Aetna US Healthcare. The researchers collected information from 78,753 people who had taken the test between January 1999 and April 2002.

To our knowledge, there are no prior studies examining ethnic variations in treatment preferences for depression or other illnesses among Internet users, said the studys senior author, Lisa Cooper, M.D., of Johns Hopkins University.

Nearly 65 percent of those surveyed said they would be most worried about their employers finding out about their depression diagnoses, although many said they would be concerned about the reaction of friends and family as well.

The survey also uncovered other surprising treatment preferences among the groups. For instance, African-American and Hispanic participants were more likely to prefer a doctor of the same sex to treat their depression than white participants. African-Americans surveyed had a strong preference for a doctor of the same ethnicity, while Asians, Hispanics and Native Americans were less likely than white participants to want a doctor from their own ethnic background.


'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Minorities, Uninsured Less Likely to Receive Care at High-Volume Hospitals
2. Minorities More Likely to Receive Alcohol Counseling
3. Minorities Likely to Keep Fighting Death to the End
4. Washington Post Examines Increase in Minorities Seeking Cosmetic Surgery
5. Angioplasty The Much Preferred Treatment Of Choice For Heart Attacks
6. Understanding Food Preferences in Kids
7. Birth Weight of Babies Important Predictor for Salt Preference
8. Elderly People Prefer The Company Of Pet Dogs
9. Do Women Die In Childbirth Because It Is More Preferable?
10. Men More Likely Prefer Marriage Than Women – Survey Report
11. Men Show More Sexual Preference Than Women
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:10/13/2017)... ... , ... Talented host, actor Rob Lowe, is introducing a ... episode of "Success Files," which is an award-winning educational program broadcasted on PBS ... in-depth with passion and integrity. , Sciatica occurs when the sciatic nerve in ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... Del. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... and advisory services for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range of ... National Association for Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held October ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... IsoComforter, Inc. ( https://isocomforter.com ), ... of an innovative new design of the shoulder pad. The shoulder pad provides ... while controlling your pain while using cold therapy. By utilizing ice and water that ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Dr. ... recently contributed a medical article to the newly revamped Cosmetic Town journal ... spotlights the hair transplant procedure known as Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Women-owned and Grand Rapids-based ... and Brightest in Wellness® by Best and Brightest. OnSite Wellness will be honored ... 20 from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Henry Autograph Collection Hotel, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... -- Caris Life Sciences ® , a leading innovator in ... medicine, today announced that St. Jude Medical Center,s Crosson ... as its 17 th member. Through participation with ... Institute will help develop standards of care and best ... cancer treatment more precise and effective. ...
(Date:10/10/2017)...   West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc. (NYSE: WST), ... administration, today shared the results of a study highlighting ... intradermal administration of polio vaccines. The study results were ... 2017 by Dr. Ondrej Mach , Clinical Trials ... (WHO), and recently published in the journal Vaccine. ...
(Date:10/4/2017)...  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), ... Urgent Care is helping communities across Massachusetts , ... offering no-cost* flu shots through the end of the month. ... regulations. ... a flu shot is by the end of October, according to the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: