Navigation Links
Manual vs. Automated Chest Compression After Cardiac Arrest

CHICAGO - Two studies comparing the use of manual chest compression vs. an automated chest compression device during resuscitation for out-of-hospital// cardiac arrest produce contrasting findings, according to the studies in the June 14 issue of JAMA.

Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest claims hundreds of thousands of lives annually in North America. Successful resuscitation depends on a coordinated set of actions including early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), according to background information in the article. Observations of rescue personnel during CPR indicate that maintaining consistent chest compressions is a difficult task. The desire to provide optimal chest compressions led to the development of automated mechanical chest compression devices. The load-distributing band (LDB) is a circumferential chest compression device with an electrically activated constricting band on a short backboard and has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in attempted resuscitation of cardiac arrest. Compared with manual chest compression, an automated LDB chest compression device produces greater blood flow to vital organs and may improve outcomes.

Al Hallstrom, Ph.D., of the University of Washington, Seattle, and colleagues conducted a study to compare LDB-CPR with manual CPR during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The multicenter, randomized trial included 1,071 patients who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the United States and Canada. Patients received either standard emergency medical services (EMS) care for cardiac arrest with a LDB-CPR device (n = 554) or manual CPR (n = 517). The primary outcome measure included survival to 4 hours after the 911 call, with secondary measures being survival to hospital discharge and neurological status among survivors.

There was no significant difference in survival at 4 hours after the 911 call between the manual CPR group and the automated LDB-CPR group overall (29.5 perce nt vs. 28.5 percent) or among the primary study population (24.7 percent vs. 26.4 percent). Survival to hospital discharge was lower in the LDB-CPR group among primary episodes (5.8 percent vs. 9.9 percent), as was survival with intact neurological status.

"As implemented in this study, the use of an automated LDB-CPR device for resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest appeared to result in lower survival and worse neurological outcomes than traditional manual CPR. Device design and implementation strategies may need further preclinical evaluation. The results of this study underscore the complexity of resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Further work is required to understand the interaction of manual or assisted chest compressions with other aspects of resuscitation such as the phase of the arrest, drug choice and dose, timing of defibrillation, and treatments such as hypothermia and coronary reperfusion," the authors conclude.


'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. ‘Manual on Healthy Lifestyle Choices’ Releasd
2. Automated Hepatitis B Test Approved By FDA
3. Automated Technique Accurately Measures Platelet Counts in "Platelet Gel" Products
4. One in Three Heart Attack Patients Have No Chest Pains
5. The Best Way To Relieve Chest Pain
6. The Options For Relieving Chest Pain In the Elderly Questioned
7. The Link Between Migraines And Chest Pain
8. Chest Pain Can Be Identified By New Tracer Chemical 30 Hours After Pain Relief
9. Arjun Singh In Hospital After Chest Pains
10. Freedom Fighter And Orissa Congress Leader Dies Of Chest Pain
11. Non-Cardiac Chest Pain Can Be Treated By Hypnotherapy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/29/2016)... Sterling, VA (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 ... ... Americans with student loans more flexibility in repaying their loans, more information about ... at a time when total outstanding student loan debt, including federal and private ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... A ... born with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia have better survival rates if surgery is ... hernia (CDH)—a condition where the diaphragm fails to form completely, letting abdominal organs ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... ... Mobility Designed is redefining mobility with their patent pending crutch design. ... distributes body weight from the elbow to the forearm. In consumer tests, users ... other crutches. , Co-founders Max and Liliana Younger were inspired to design the crutches ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... Melanoma is the deadliest type of skin ... blame for the majority of skin cancer deaths. More than 10,000 people are expected to ... at diagnosis is 62, it is the one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... Hills, CA (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... of devices and products for the head and neck/ear, nose and throat specialty, has ... Device , The KOTLER NASAL AIRWAY™ is a newly patented safety device ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)... YORK , April 28, 2016  While ... notably complement the company,s valve repair and stent ... move also places Abbott more firmly into patient ... of the fastest growing device areas, with double-digit ... its recent report,  Advanced Remote Patient Monitoring ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... YORK , April 28, 2016  The blood ... 275 million dollars, according to Kalorama Information and The ... typing, immunoassays and nucleic acid testing.  The healthcare research ... made progress in developing blood collection stations and in ... made in Kalorama Information,s report, Blood Testing ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... , April 28, 2016 Oramed ... a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development of oral ... in the upcoming PIONEERS 2016 conference, presented by Joseph ... 2016 in New York . Nadav ... at the conference. Presentation Details:   ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: