Navigation Links
Lancing tumours into the body

A team of micromachine experts report this week that they have developed tiny spinning screws that could swim along veins, ferrying drugs to infected tissues, or even burrow into tumours to kill them off with a hot lance.Kazushi Ishiyama at Tohoku University in Japan has designed swimming micromachines based on cylindrical magnets.//

Measuring 8 milllimetres long and less than a millimetre in diameter, each magnet is made of a neodymium-iron-boron alloy.Ishiyama made two prototypes to test his idea. The first was designed to move in liquids and had a short section of ceramic pipe attached to each end of the magnet. A wire wound around the pipe’s surface gave it a screw-like thread.

To Test the device, Ishiyama immersed it in a container of silicone oil, which was fixed between two vertical coils of wire. By pumping alternating current through the coils, Ishiyama produced a rotating magnetic field around the container, which set the screw spinning.Because of its threaded surface the screw slowly began to cut through the oil. Its speed increased as the frequency of the rotating magnetic field was ramped up.

Ishiyama’s second prototype, designed to swim and burrow into tissue, used a similar magnet but instead has a pointed, threaded brass tip at one end.This time, Ishiyama tested the device in liquids thicker than oil. He found that it could move at nearly 2 centimetres per second in a thick agar gel. Again, the device moved faster the quicker the magnetic field was rotated, up to a maximum of 20 hertz. Above this frequency, the magnet stopped spinning and ground to a halt.

After the gel tests, Ishiyama decided through real tissue. He found it could screw itself through a 2-centimetre thick chunk of beef steak in 20 seconds. Because the devices are so small, Ishiyama says they could be injected into the body using standard hypodermic needles. Once inside a vein, they could be steered around the body magnetically.Inside the b ody, Ishiyama says the devices could carry drugs to the sites of infection. His latest prototype is even armed with a tiny metal spike that heats up when you apply a second magnetic field vibrating at 100 kHz.

The hot spike could be useful for destroying cancerous tissue, Ishiyama believes. The high frequency field used to heat the metal tip doesn’t interfere with steering the device, he adds.Says Edwin Jager at Linkoping University in Sweden, who is designing tiny robots to manipulate single cells in the body that “surgeons are understandably cautious about the idea of microbots floating free in the body.

If one blocked a blood vessel,” for example, it could be disastrous.He also says that Ishiyama’s prototypes might be too long to safely navigate some of the tighter turns in blood vessels.While Ishiyama concedes that his swimming machines won’t replace standard tools such as catheters for medical operations any time soon, he thinks that nanobots even smaller than this could have a distinct advantage.


Related medicine news :

1. Multi billion-dollar suit filed against cell phone firm for causing brain tumours
2. Low-radiation treatment for brain tumours
3. Avastin under trial to test efficacy for pancreatic tumours!
4. Awake Surgery to treat Brain tumours
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 2015 , ... TyloHelo Inc , North America’s largest ... accessories help improve the bather experience in the sauna, and the accessories selected ... purist looking for simplicity in design to accessories that encourage a greater expression ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , ... November 25, 2015 , ... For the first ... “ Two Organizations, One Beat ” campaign. The partnership between the two groups began ... aid in MAP International’s cause. , MAP International was founded in 1954 and is ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... On November 25, 2015, ... for the Narconon network, announced the release of a new cutting edge recovery program ... organization has been working with drug- and alcohol-addicted individuals with the purpose to free ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , ... November 25, 2015 , ... Smiles by ... TMJ Disorder, Bruxism, and moderate facial wrinkling. While many patients are aware of the ... the great success Botox® delivers to those suffering with discomfort, soreness, and pain as ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... ... In an ongoing Clinical Study conducted by an independent physician, Andrew Gostine, ... evaluating the efficacy of its product and its disinfection protocol. This study is taking ... 2014 through October 2015 at a 360-bed, acute-care, academic medical center located in Chicago, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... , Nov. 25, 2015 USP ... hazardous drug preparations (e.g. pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, nurses, ... veterinary technicians). The chapter also covers all entities ... (e.g., pharmacies, hospitals, other healthcare institutions, patient treatment ... --> --> What ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 25, 2015 Asia ... which BioLight and the New Investors will make a ... via a private placement. The financing will help IOPtima ... system used in the treatment of glaucoma, as well ... the IOPtimate™ system with the U.S. Food and Drug ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... LONDON , November 25, 2015 Developmental, ... key role in boosting the profitability of pharmaceutical products, ... Developmental, commercial, and regulatory/legal strategies all play ... says GBI Research . --> ... all play a key role in boosting the profitability of pharmaceutical ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: