Navigation Links
It may be possible to switch off acute pain

New York: Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center have uncovered a protein in nerve cells that behaves like a switch for severe pain. They hope to manufacture drugs that are capable of blocking chronic pain, by simply switching off. //

Most prior attempts at alleviating chronic pain have focused on the "second order" neurons in the spinal cord that relay pain messages to the brain. It's difficult to inhibit the activity of these neurons with drugs, though, because the drugs need to overcome the blood-brain barrier. Instead, the CUMC researchers have focused on the more accessible "first order" neurons in the periphery of our body that send messages to the spinal cord.

Pain becomes chronic when the activity of first and second order neurons persists after damaged neuron heals or the tissue inflammation subsides. It's been known for years that for chronic pain to persist, a master switch must be turned on inside the peripheral neurons, though until now the identity of this switch remained a mystery. Richard Ambron, Ph.D., professor of cell biology, and Ying-Ju Sung, Ph.D., assistant professor, both in the department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, have now discovered that the switch is an enzyme called protein kinase G (PKG).

"We're very optimistic that this discovery and our continued research will ultimately lead to a novel approach to pain relief for the millions suffering from chronic pain," said Dr. Ambron.

The researchers found that upon injury or inflammation, the PKG is turned on and activated. Once activated, these molecules set off other processes that generate the pain messages. As long as the PKG remains on, the pain persists. Conversely, turning the PKG off relieves the pain, making PKG an excellent target for therapy.

Dr. Ambron and Dr. Sung have applied for a patent for the pathway that turns on the PKG, as well as several molecules that inhibit it.

Based on the 2004 Ame ricans Living with Pain Survey, 72 percent of people with chronic pain have lived with it for more than three years, including a third who have lived with pain for more than a decade. Yet nearly half of people with pain do not consult a physician for several months or longer, despite the impact the pain has on their lives.

The worldwide painkiller market was worth $50 billion in 2005 and is expected to increase to $75 billion by 2010 and $105 billion by 2015. But none of the existing drugs on the market are adequate to deal with chronic pain. Cox-2 inhibitors carry severe risk of side effects, opioids are highly addictive, Tylenol is ineffective for chronic pain, and other pain drugs cause significant drowsiness.

The discovery is published on the website of the journal Neuroscience, and will appear in the publication's August issue.

Source: Eureka Alert


'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Borderline blood pressure- possible health risk
2. Depression a possible danger in elderly
3. Use of zinc supplements tied to possible increase in risk of prostate cancer
4. Return of SARS possible this fall
5. New treatment possible for drug addiction
6. Early identification of autism possible
7. Early diagnosis for autism from blood tests may be possible
8. Cloning of human embryos for stem cells made possible
9. Injury to knee may result in arthritis, but it is possible to prevent it
10. Treatment for chemobrain may be possible
11. Early detection of bed sores possible
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/17/2017)... ... ... Today, FloSports , a global leader in live digital sports and ... a long-term extension of their media partnership. The partnership, which began in 2013, will ... premier events exclusively on FloWrestling.com as well as usage of the FloArena meet management ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... Costa Mesa, California (PRWEB) , ... January 16, 2017 , ... ... Since 2014, Dr. Beazley has served on CalSouthern’s Board of Trustees and as a ... Sciences. In addition, he has been a professor of psychology at Pepperdine University, where ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... January 16, 2017 , ... Anybody who may be looking for ... new video released by Serenity Recovery, a holistic treatment center for addiction located in ... features footage and testimonials from patients and staff that visited the 2016 Recovery Palooza ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... January 16, 2017 , ... ... the newly updated International Audit Protocol Consortium (IAPC) EHS audit protocol for ... understand the scope of their EHS regulatory obligations and rapidly collect, share, archive, ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... January 16, 2017 , ... Board-certified oculoplastic ... Journal , the official journal of The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ... The procedure is designed to correct drooping, retracted lower eyelids, which usually result ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/16/2017)... synthetic Fentanyl arrived on the streets in 2015, dealers were ... samples, inviting would-be customers to test a newly-created batch. They ... The rapidly-growing demand for the powerful ... has racked up a staggering death toll across ... fentanyl sales reveals that they have sold nearly 400 grams ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... and PUNE, India , January ... by Allied Market Research, titled, "Vital Signs Monitoring Devices Market ... Forecast, 2014-2022", projects that the global vital signs monitoring devices ... expected to reach $5,491 million by 2022, growing at a ... America was the leading regional market in global ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... 2017 The report "Cellulose ... (Methyl, Ethyl, Hydroxyethyl, Hydroxypropyl, Carboxymethyl Cellulose), Application ... Coatings & Paints), Region - Global Forecast ... was valued at USD 4.51 Billion in ... 6.41 Billion by 2021, at a CAGR ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: