Navigation Links
Important parameters of life: Longevity and quality: both improved by exercise

“The grapes are sour!” is a very famous saying which refers to an attitude when we know something is good but are unable to achieve it and so feign that we are not concerned about it//.

The same can be said about exercise! Everybody knows it's good; yet many people still avoid it, forgoing its potential health benefits.

Contrary to the above statement researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who studied the effects of exercise on aging point to new findings that may inspire people to get up, get out and get moving on a regular basis. The research team, led by kinesiology professor Edward McAuley, found that previously sedentary seniors who incorporated exercise into their lifestyles not only improved physical function, but experienced psychological benefits as well.

The UI research indicated positive psychosocial and cognitive outcomes -- in effect, significant quality-of-life gains -- among participants who remained physically active long after they began an initial randomized, six-month exercise trial consisting of walking and stretching/toning exercises. Results were gleaned from a battery of surveys and assessments administered at one- and five-year intervals following the initial exercise regimen. McCauley said the study -- which assessed physical activity levels, quality of life, physical self-esteem, self-efficacy and affect in a large sample (174) of adults over age 65 -- is believed to be the only one to date to examine the relationship between physical activity and quality of life over such a long time. "Self-efficacy," McAuley noted, can be defined as "the belief, or self-confidence, in one's capacity to successfully carry out a task"; while "affect" refers to reported levels of happiness or contentment.

The researchers found that participants who continued to be physically active a year after baseline responses were recorded -- through engagement in leisure, occupational or home activities, su ch as house-cleaning or gardening -- were "fitter, had higher levels of self-efficacy and physical self-esteem, expressed more positive affect and reported, in turn, a better quality of life."

"Our findings are important on several fronts," McAuley said. "First, we demonstrated that physical activity has long-term effects on important aspects of psychosocial functioning through its influences on self-efficacy, quality of life and self-esteem."

"Second, there is a growing interest in the relationship between physical activity and quality of life, especially in older adults. However, much of this work suggests a direct relationship between the two. Our work takes the approach, and the data support it, that physical activity influences more global aspects of quality of life through its influence on more proximal physical and psychological factors such as affect, self-efficacy and health status." A related, two-year study conducted in McAuley's lab looked at the roles played by physical activity, health status and self-efficacy in determining "global quality of life," or satisfaction with life among older adults. The research focused on a different sample of 249 older black and white women. Results of that study will be published in an article titled "Physical Activity and Quality of Life in Older Adults: Influence of Health Status and Self-Efficacy" in a forthcoming edition of the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

In that study, the researchers tested three potentially competing models of the physical activity/quality-of-life relationship and ultimately concluded that their findings "offer a strong theoretical foundation for understanding physical activity and quality-of-life relationships in older adults."

McAuley said the study's results confirm earlier findings by other researchers suggesting "changes in levels of functioning in older adults with chronic conditions were not predicted simply by health status or disease state, bu t also by physical activity and self-efficacy."

"These reductions, in turn, provide fewer opportunities to experience successful, efficacy-enhancing behaviors leading to further reductions in efficacy," McAuley said. "Our data would suggest that such declines are likely to lead to subsequent reductions in health status and, ultimately, quality of life."

Source: Annals of Behavioral Medicine.
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Important substance in curry conciliate Inflamed Colon
2. Important cause of Arthritis
3. Continuation Of Medication After Heart Surgery Very Important
4. Weather Found To Play An Important Role In Cholesterol Levels
5. Genes More Important Than Exercise for Bad Cholesterol
6. Shortness Of Breath An Important Indicator Of Heart Attack
7. Birth Weight of Babies Important Predictor for Salt Preference
8. Happiness Plays An Important Role In Success
9. Dance An Important Factor In Choosing Mate.
10. Brain Plays Important Role In Diabetes Cure
11. Novel Protein, Staufen2 Important In Maintenance Of Nerve Synapses
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... Pixel Film Studios Released ... , "Film editors can give their videos a whole new perspective by using the ... CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProSlice Levels contains over 30 Different presets ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... , ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... once they have been diagnosed with endometriosis. These women need a treatment plan ... require a comprehensive approach that can help for preservation of fertility and ultimately ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to a possible lice ... overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from a human host, ... a necessary one in the event that lice have simply gotten out of control. , ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. ... his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in ... to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether it’s a ... the bar too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, those who ... , Research from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency to set ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Research and Markets has ... by Type (Organic Chemical (Sugar, Petrochemical, Glycerin), Inorganic Chemical), ... Parenteral) - Global Forecast to 2021" report to ... The global pharmaceutical excipients market is projected to reach ... 6.1% in the forecast period 2016 to 2021. ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 ... CAPR ), a biotechnology company focused on ... today announced that patient enrollment in its ongoing ... Duchenne) has exceeded 50% of its 24-patient target. ... in the third quarter of 2016, and to ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... INDIANAPOLIS , June 23, 2016 ... Tomorrow,s Leaders Scholarship is any indication, the future is ... online at www.diabetesscholars.org by the Diabetes Scholars ... in the way of academic and community service excellence. ... program since 2012, and continues to advocate for people ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: