Navigation Links
Human Rights Activists Sleepless In Seattle

Its a battle between the lesser of two evils or the better of two goods, in the case of Ashley. Ashley, known to the world by just one name , is a severely disabled nine -year old- girl. In addition to extreme physical disability, mental disability as well renders her mind akin to a three-month-old baby.

Ashleys parents who have remained anonymous till now have outlined their treatment and care of their daughter, whom they refer to as the pillow angel, on an online website.

Yet ever since they published accounts of an operation; a hysterectomy, performed on Ashley, which they granted approval to believing it to be in the best interests of their daughter, they as well as the hospital that performed the operation have been under fire.

The suit against Children's Hospital & Regional Medical Center, Seattle, was filed by the patient-rights group, the Washington Protection and Advocacy System (WPAS). According to them, performing the operation on a minor like Ashley without prior permission from a court was a violation of Ashley's constitutional and common-law rights.

Incidentally, the operation has halted the physical and sexual development of Ashley, as well as her ability to become pregnant.

In response, the hospital admitting a communication breakdown, agreed that it was acting outside the law when its doctors performed the controversial hysterectomy even when her parents and doctors had concluded the operation was in Ashleys best interests. Hospital officials now acknowledge they should first have sought court approval for the 2004 surgery on the girl.

Ashleys parents have explained why they took the extreme step of stunting their childs growth- by series of interventions like the hysterectomy, high doses of hormones to stop her bones from growing and surgery to stop her breasts from developing.

They say that it was in the best interests of their daughter, as the operations would make Ashle y more comfortable and less susceptible to health problems associated with being bedridden. Her body would be "more appropriate and provide her more dignity and integrity than a fully grown female body."

They reasoned that a smaller child would be easier to include in family life and to decrease the chances of medical problems if she became too large for them to move.

They say the hysterectomy was performed to prevent bleeding during her treatment and eliminate the risk of uterine cancers and menstrual discomfort. Her breast buds were removed to prevent her breasts from growing to protect her from possible sexual abuse and to eliminate the risk of a breast disease, of which her family has a history.

Ashley was diagnosed with static encephalopathy, or severe brain damage, after she had feeding problems and developmental delays shortly after birth. The now 9-year-old girl's hysterectomy was part of a series of treatments sought when she was referred in 2004 to Dr. Daniel Gunther at Children's when she showed signs of early puberty.

Assistant state Attorney General Edward Dee who reviewed the case after an unidentified person complained about the treatment, said that though Washington has no specific law forbidding the procedures performed on Ashley, state courts have ruled that sterilization of a developmentally disabled person for birth-control purposes requires court approval.


Related medicine news :

1. Human Genome Project Achieves Technological Triumph
2. First Vaccine Designed for Africa Cleared for Testing in Humans
3. Human gene number increases
4. Scientists found ancient Human Germ Killer
5. New standards for Human Research Safety
6. Human wasting disease linked to a gene
7. The Human Mad Cow Case
8. Human Growth Hormone Found To be Dangerous For Human Use
9. Human Antibody That Can Block SARS
10. Human immunity system can battle HIV.
11. Two New Human Papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines to prevent cervical cancer
Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/25/2015)... , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... has focused on providing comprehensive solutions involving adult stem cell therapies to patients ... officially deemed the “Regenestem” name as a Registered Trademark (RTM). , Organizations are ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 25, 2015 , ... Bunion Bootie , the newest ... of the early holiday shopping season. Starting Wednesday November 25th, Bunion Booties are ... Friday promotional pricing is in addition to any automatic discounts applied when buying ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... Eric C. Seidel, ... many benefits of the revolutionary BIOLASE WaterLase iPlus 2.0™ system. This advanced laser ... used by a dentist in Gettysburg, PA . From routine visits to ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... , ... New patients who wish to seek treatment for missing teeth can ... her Mississauga, ON practice. Dr. Williams has been providing dental service for over 34 ... Missing teeth can lead to a variety of complications if they are not replaced ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... Charitable giving is at its peak during the holidays. In fact, ... the year totalling over $358 billion in 2014. With more than 1.5 million ... individuals who want to “give back” during the holidays. , “With so many charities ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015 Research and Markets ( ) ... - Global Forecast to 2020" report to their ... for 37.21% of the total market share in 2014. ... region is projected to growth at the highest CAGR ... primarily to the fast growing water, industrial gas treatment, ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... 25, 2015 WuXi PharmaTech (Cayman) Inc. ("WuXi" ... open-access R&D capability and technology platform company serving the ... China and the ... extraordinary general meeting of shareholders held today, the Company,s ... and approve the previously announced agreement and plan of ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... N.C. , Nov. 24, 2015  In the ... projects in an effort to quickly uncover new insights, ... --> --> However, ... a market research project and ensure that all rules ... and industry standards. Another major barrier to efficiently launching ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: